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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[The W.O.W.  (Woodmen on the World) Drill Team]

[The W.O.W. (Woodmen on the World) Drill Team]

Date: June 1947
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the Woodmen of the World Drill Team, taken on June 19, 1947. A caption on the back of the photograph reads: WOW DRILL TEAM 6-19-47---- Herman Tolbert, Capt.--LEFT TO RIGHT: Front row: Walter Carter, Gene Lee, Jimmy Brandenburg, Charlie Davis, Bill Teichman, Idys Cox, Jr., Boyce Harvey, Billy Brooks. Back Row: Melton Brewton, Walter Moore, Hayden Hughes, Bazil Brewton, Unknown [heavily underlined, with small lacuna, also underlined, following] Roy Alderson, Roy Brewton and Eldred Fryer. A further caption, rotated 90 degrees to the first reads: "Picture taken in Convention Hall." On the front of the photograph is handwritten: "phillips [sic] photog-aphic [sic] Service Abilene, Texas" in white ink. The photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[W. W. Howard's Hardware Store]

[W. W. Howard's Hardware Store]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Howard Hardware store was once located at 101 E. Hubbard St. The dimness of the store makes discerning the items on sale difficult. A double row of "air-tight" stoves ranks down the center, flanked at the foreground by a display of guns. Persons identified in picture are: Helin Howard, Flora Howard, A. L. Howard and one unidentified person.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Wagley Bath House]

[The Wagley Bath House]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Wagley Mineral Baths, formerly known as the Bimini Bath House, was located at 114 NW 4th Street, the N.E. corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 4th Street. It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy and Croft. It was still standing in 1974, when A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" was first published. An early picture of the building appears on page 129 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells." It was demolished in the late 1980's or early 1990's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Wagley Bath House and Annex

The Wagley Bath House and Annex

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Wagley Bath House and Annex (originally called "The Bimini") was located at 114 NW 4th Street. Dr. Wagley also owned and operated a pharmacy in Mineral Wells. He died in 1953, at the age of 68, from a stroke of apoplexy.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Walker's Grocery and Market]

[Walker's Grocery and Market]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is the J.J. Walker Grocery & Market, once located at 614 Southeast 6th Avenue. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 176. The identities of the three people pictured is not known. Note, however, the hand-operated gasoline pumps, the oil pumps in the background, and a sign that advertises Texaco gasoline at 18 cents per gallon!
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Water Tower]

[The Water Tower]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1920?/1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]

[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]

Date: 1990?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, and Northwestern (WMW&NW) Railroad began operations October 1,1891. The Texas & Pacific Railway bought out the WMW&NW in 1902, and shortly thereafter built this depot to replace a former wooden structure that had been destroyed by fire. The rail line had a colorful history, operating through World War II and into the 1990's. Construction of an extension of the line to the city of Oran was completed in 1907, and on to Graford the following January. In 1912 two McKeen motor coaches (called "Doodlebugs" by the locals)were added. These were self-contained, 200 Horsepower, 70-foot long, gasoline-powered, 80-passenger coaches which provided service between Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Fort Worth and Dallas. A round trip took less than six hours, and two "Doodlebugs" provided service in each direction every three hours. In 1913, the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad, building south from Seymour, Texas, began operations over the WMW&NW line from Salesville to Mineral Wells, thus connecting the cities of Seymour, Olney, Jacksboro, Graford, Oran, Salesville, Mineral Wells, and Weatherford with daily round-trip service to Dallas. In 1928, passenger traffic had declined to a point that passenger service was discontinued, and did not resume until the nation began mobilizing ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
weaver_9

weaver_9

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Welcome Sign]

[The Welcome Sign]

Date: 1972
Creator: unknown
Description: The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was built in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor,in his San Antonio iron works following the State Rotary Club's Convention in Mineral Wells. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library