You limited your search to:

  Partner: Arlington Public Library
 Collection: Arlington Police Department Collection
[Arlington Police Museum. Newspaper picture of Russian police officer Oleg Orjekhouski touring the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping with a photograph taken by Carolyn Bauman from the Fort Worth Star Telegram April 23, 1992 of Moscow police officer Oleg Orjekhouski. The caption beneath the picture says "Moscow police officer Oleg Orjekhouski looks at one of the displays at the Arlington Police Museum." The display is of a mannequin wearing a motorcycle police uniform. A United States Flag is in the background. Officer Orjekhouski is wearing his uniform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176436/
[Newspaper article about the street dedications for fallen Arlington police officers, part 1]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article written by Jessamy Brown. The article is about the street naming dedications for Arlington police officers James Johnson, Gary Harl, Jerry Crocker, and Terry Lewis who died in the line of duty. It includes brief statements from family members of the slain officers. There are three pictures in the article. The largest is of Luther Johnson with a photo of his brother Officer James Johnson who died in 1930. Two other smaller pictures are photos of Officer Jerry Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176434/
[Newspaper article about the street dedications for fallen Arlington police officers, part 2]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article written by Jessamy Brown. The article is about the street naming dedications for Arlington police officers James Johnson, Gary Harl, Jerry Crocker, and Terry Lewis who died in the line of duty. It includes brief statements from family members of the slain officers. It shows a map of the street locations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176435/
[Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building Open House cartoon, newspaper clipping,1989]
Photograph of a cartoon drawn by Susan Gaylord Buxton for the Ft. Worth Star Telegram encouraging people to come to the Open House of the new Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building. Police Chief Kunkle and Fire Chief Strickland are holding a banner stating the date and time of the event. Balloons with captions tell of various activities and attractions. The name of the cartoon is "The Front Line." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176362/
[Arlington Police Officer Terry Lewis's casket carried by the Honor Guard during his funeral, newspaper clipping, 1992]
Photograph of Arlington Police Honor Guard carrying Officer Terry Lewis's casket during his funeral. Officer Lewis was killed in the line of duty by vehicular assault on October 9, 1992. It was taken by Gregg Ellman October 13, 1992 for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176368/
[Arlington Police Officer Dick Hill leads the motorcycle division's training at Arlington Stadium, newspaper clipping]
Photograph of Police Officer Dick Hill leading a group from the motorcycle division along the walkways of outfield seats at the Arlington Stadium. They used the stadium and surrounding area for training exercises. It was taken by Jerry W. Hoefer from the Fort Worth Star Telegram. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176367/
[Arlington Police Officer Dick Hill newspaper article from the Arlington Daily News, 1975]
Photograph of an article written by Beth Ann Loomis from the Arlington Daily News Monday Profile about Officer Dick Hill. The title of the article is "Former Chicago Bear now patrols streets for APD." It shows a picture of Officer Dick Hill wearing his police motorcycle helmet and firing speed radar at motorists. The article gives a brief profile of the officer's background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176492/
[Arlington Police Museum. Newspaper picture of Russian police officer Col. Galija Mavljutov touring the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping with a photograph taken by Brad Loper from the Arlington Morning News of Russian police officer Col. Galija Mavljutov touring the Arlington police museum after she attended the International Association of Women Police conference in Dallas. The caption at the top of the picture says "Policewomen join forces." The picture also shows various artifacts on display at the museum including three mannequins wearing uniforms and a United States Flag. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176496/
[Arlington Canine Officer David Kruckemeyer training with Timo, newspaper clipping, 1987]
Photograph of Canine (K-9) Officer David Kruckemeyer training with police dog, Timo. Canine (K-9) Units were established in 1985. The Arlington Citizen Journal newspaper photo was taken by Bruce Maxwell and hand dated November 1987. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176363/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott comforting Ernestine Henderson, newspaper clipping, 1991]
Photograph of Police Chaplain Harold Elliott comforting Ernestine Henderson, the mother of a drowning victim at Lake Arlington, when he told her that her son's body had been found. It was taken by Allen Rose from the Fort Worth Star Telegram, July 12, 1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176365/
[Image of a newspaper article about the kidney donation of Arlington Police Officer P.J. Brock to co-worker Vern Griffin]
Photograph of a newspaper article written by Susan Schrock telling about Arlington Police Officer P. J. Brock donating a kidney to fellow employee, Vern Griffin. Vern Griffin worked as a property and evidence technician for the APD. The title of the article is "Kidney donor and co-worker are doing fine after surgery." The article includes color photographs of Officer Brock and Mr. Griffin. The surgery occured on September 9th, 2009. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176297/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott's film "Suicide is not painless" newspaper article from the Arlington Daily News, 1986]
Photograph of an article written by Nancy Visser from the Arlington Daily News about the 22-minute docudrama promoted by Chaplain Harold Elliott on teenage suicide. The title of the article is "Special film to show pain of suicide." It shows a picture of Chaplain Elliott watching a film crew prepare for a scene near Lake Arlington. The title of Chaplain Elliott's film is "Suicide is not painless." The film has been shown in schools, foriegn countries, and the military. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176493/
[APD Communication Center, newspaper clipping 1989]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper clipping by Brent Winn. It shows a woman sitting at the communication center with another woman standing behind her. The caption beneath the picture reads: "Workers in 911 like Ann Whitley and Donna Hughes handle both minor mishaps and life-threatening situations." This photo was taken at the Police Substation, 4000 Little Road, Arlington. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176454/
[AMBER Alert : President George W. Bush signs the AMBER Alert into law]
Photograph of President George W. Bush signing into law the AMBER Alert package, which would create a system to help find kidnapped children and impose tougher penalties on child abusers, kidnappers and pornographers. In January 1996, Amber Haggerman was abducted and killed in Arlington, Texas. Amber's mother, Donna Whitson, with her hand on Amber's brother, Ricky, observe the signing. This photo was taken at the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C. Also in the photo is Elizabeth Smart standing behind Amber's brother, Ricky, with her parents. Fourteen year old Elizabeth Smart was kidnapped from her Salt Lake City, Utah, bedroom June 5, 2002. Smart was found alive nine months later in Sandy, Utah, about 18 miles from her home. The AMBER Plan is known as America's Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176327/
[APD badges and decorations]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of an Arlington police badge centered and surrounded by decorations. The caption reads "Clockwise from top in order of precedence: Medal of Honor; Medal of Valor; Wounded in Action; Distinguished Service; Police Officer's Award; Medal of Merit; Supervisor of the Year; Officer of the Year; Service to Youth; Community Service; Life Saving; Rookie of the Year; Reserve Office of the Year; Service Award; Safe Driving." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176446/
[APD badges, current versions, view 1]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of the current versions of the Arlington police badges. Showing are: Chief, Sergeant, Deputy Chief, Officer, Lieutenant, Chaplain, and Captain. Use of these badges started in the late 1970s, early 1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176441/
[APD badges, current versions, view 2]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of the current versions of the Arlington police badges. Showing are: Chief, Sergeant, Deputy Chief, Officer, Lieutenant, Chaplain, and Captain. Use of these badges started in the late 1970s, early 1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176498/
[APD badges, earlier versions, 1st close view]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book 1994 of the first Arlington police badges. Five badges are shown, including Captain, Chaplain and Sergeant badges. The badge in the center is pre-1950. The other badges were used up until the late 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176440/
[APD badges, earlier versions, 2nd view]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book 1994 of the first Arlington police badges. Five badges are shown, including Captain, Chaplain and Sergeant badges. The badge in the center is pre-1950. The other badges were used up until the late 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176497/
[APD Chaplain Elliott, his wife, and Chief Bowman at the grand reopening of the museum at the Arlington Training Center]
Photograph of Chaplain Harold Elliott (center) standing between his wife Norma and Chief Theron Bowman at the grand reopening of the Arlington Police Museum at the Arlington Police Training Center located at 6000 W. Pioneer Parkway. Various artifacts of police memorabilia are on display behind them. The museum was founded in 1982 by Arlington Police Chaplain Harold K. Elliott when he began to collect items and store them in the attic of his Arlington home. By 1989, the items were moved to the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center. It was moved again to a more spacious room at the Police Training Center in March of 2007. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176489/
[APD Color Guard, ca. 1992]
Photograph of five members of the Color Guard (in uniform) taken about 1992 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). The Color Guard section of the Honor Guard carry the National, State, and City flags during events. L to R are Billy Russell, Steve Hall, Lonny Wright, Bob Gonzales and Henry Hernandez. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176414/
[APD Color Guard marching in the Arlington Fourth of July Parade, late 1980s]
Photograph of the Color Guard section of the Honor Guard carrying the National, State, and City flags during the Arlington Fourth of July Parade. They are marching down Abrams Street near the West Street intersection. Parade spectators are along the edge of the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176391/
[APD Community Service Award recipients]
Photograph of Tommy Ingram, Lee Eastman, Gary Krohn, Del Fisher, and Britt Snipes receiving a community service award (Texas Crime Prevention Association, Inc., Outstanding Crime Prevention Agency Award, Honorable Mention, Arlington Police Department). All the officers are in tan uniform. Lee Eastman and Gary Krohn are holding the award plaque. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176322/
[APD community service van]
Photograph of an Arlington police department community service van as three photographs framed together in one 3-hole vertical frame. The top and bottom photographs are black & white and show the Ford van in bad condition. The middle photograph is color and shows the van to be painted blue with an Arlington Police decal on the back side pannel and the words "Sport Wagon" printed on the side doors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176323/
[APD detectives, 1960s]
Photograph of six Arlington police detectives in an office. All are dressed in suits. One man is sitting at a desk with a typewriter. A large sign on the wall says "Think." Standing L-R: J.D. McGee, LeRoy Carmichael, Bob Parsons (leaning on the filing cabinet) and ?. Sitting L-R: Jack Green (with typewriter) and Tom Lee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176359/
[APD Honor Guard, ca. 1992]
Photograph of the Honor Guard (17 officers) in uniform about 1992 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). All are standing in three rows with five officers on the front row holding rifles. The National, State and City flags are centered behind them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176413/
[APD Honor Guard, ca. 1995]
Photograph of the Honor Guard (15 officers) in uniform about 1995 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). All are standing in two rows with five officers on the back row holding rifles. Portions of the name of the building show behind the legs of the officers on the front row. The Honor Guard contains three separate sections: Color Guard, Shooting (or Firing) Party, and an Honors Party. The Honor Guard participates in parades, dedication ceremonies, and other official events and represents the city as goodwill ambassadors across the state. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176328/
[APD Honor Guard "Color Guard" in front of Tarrant County Courthouse]
Photograph of the five member Honor Guard "Color Guard" team marching in a Tarrant County Memorial Service for Fallen Officers in front of the Tarrant County Courthouse in Fort Worth, Texas. They are carrying the United States Flag, the Texas State Flag, and the City of Arlington Flag. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176468/
[APD Honor Guard members making speech, 1986]
Photograph of three members of the Honor Guard from 1986 (that can be seen). The Honor guard was created in April 1986. One of the officers is making a speech with the other officers standing nearby. All officers are dressed in Honor Guard uniforms. Named officers are Jim Lowery, James Laman, and Charlie Wallace. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176317/
[APD Honor Guard officer, Gary Krohn, standing at attention]
Photograph of an outdoor shot of Officer Gary Krohn in full Honor Guard uniform standing at attention. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176467/
[APD Honor Guard Rifle team at a memorial service]
Photograph of the seven member Honor Guard Rifle team (Shooting Party) standing at attention with their rifles at their side, barrel touching the ground. They form a line standing in the cemetery at Moore Memorial Gardens. Two other officers are standing nearby and two police cars are in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176469/
[APD. "Lock and unload!" campaign picture]
Photograph of Texas Ranger baseball player Will Clark holding a shot gun and police officer Austin Barrett holding a hand gun for the Firearms Injury Prevention campaign. The slogan "Lock and unload!" is added to the picture. National Fire Protection Association logo Risk Watch is in the bottom left corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176339/
[APD Millennium badge and Mobile Command Post "MC-1" bus]
Photograph of the APD Millennium badge and a photograph of the "MC-1" Mobile Command Post bus. The gold Millennium badge is imprinted with the words "Arlington," "Police," "1884-2000," "Texas" (printed inside a white baseball), a bronze colored front view of the Texas Rangers Stadium, and the word "Officer." The badge was worn from November 1999 until January 1, 2000. The MC-1 Mobile Command Post is a white bus with wavy red, black, and blue stripes on the side bottom. It serves as a temporary station. Across the side top of the bus is the Arlington Police patch emblem and the words "Arlington Police Department." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176453/
[APD "Missing" flyer for Amber Haggerman, 1996]
Photograph of the police flyer posted for the abduction of Amber Haggerman of Arlington in January of 1996. Her story led to the AMBER Alert system. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176326/
[APD Mobile Crime Lab newspaper article from the Arlington Good Times Magazine, 1974]
Photograph of an article from the November 1974 City of Arlington Good Times Magazine about the new Arlington Police Department Mobile Crime Lab. The title of the article is "Police Crime Lab hits the streets." It shows a picture of Officer James Bethany, who was in charge of the designing of the inside of the lab, standing beside the mobile crime lab vehicle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176491/
[APD Motorcycle Division, 1976]
Photograph of eight police motorcylces lined up at an angle. Each motorcycle carries a fully uniformed police officer. This photograph was included in the 1984 Arlington Police Commemorative Book with the caption "1976 Motorcycle Squad." Included in the photograph are Rudy Salazar, Doug Coldwell, Lynn Dodson, Jim Cagle, Charles Waybourn, John Faltynski, Homer DeWolfe, and Larry Jones. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176449/
[APD Motorcycle Division, 1980s]
Photograph of six police officers in tan uniforms, motorcycle boots, and helmets standing next to their police motorcycles in front of a residence. They are L-R: James Henicke, Rudi Panke, Dick Hill, Don Burke, Tommy Dingman, and Billy Russell. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176381/
[APD Motorcycle Division in a Fourth of July parade, late 1980s]
Photograph of a late 1980's Arlington Fourth of July Parade where members of the Motorcycle Division are riding in front of the Honor Guard carrying the flags. A fire truck and an ambulance follows the group as they move along Abrams Street. Many parade spectators are along the side of the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176401/
[APD Motorcycle Patrol Unit, 1922, left view]
Partial photograph of the Motorcycle Patrol Unit of 1922. The photograph was taken on a street with a brick wall in the background. Some of the men are standing on the sidewalk and some of the men are sitting on their motorcycles. Included in the photograph are Jim Coke, Constable Robert Young, Mike Thompson, Police Commissioner Hugh Moore, Guy Newman, Mr. Baker and Harvey Oldman. The motorcycles are possibly Indian Twins. The picture shows details on the left side of the group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176313/
[APD Motorcycle Patrol Unit, 1922, right view]
Partial photograph of the Motorcycle Patrol Unit of 1922. The photograph was taken on a street with a brick wall in the background. Some of the men are standing on the sidewalk and some of the men are sitting on their motorcycles. Included in the photograph are Jim Coke, Constable Robert Young, Mike Thompson, Police Commissioner Hugh Moore, Guy Newman, Mr. Baker and Harvey Oldman. The motorcycles are possibly Indian Twins. The picture shows details on the right side of the group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176312/
[APD Mounted Patrol police with motorcycle policeman, ca. 1986]
Photograph of two police officers in tan uniform on horseback and a police officer in tan uniform on his Harley Davidson police motorcycle. The caption under the print says "Members of the Police department's mounted patrol unit prepare their horses for duty." Officer Dan Armstrong and Officer Chuck Johnson are mounted on their horses and Officer Don Burke is sitting on his motorcycle "Old Silver". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176422/
[APD. New 1993 Arlington police cruiser]
Photograph of a new 1993 Chevrolet Arlington police cruiser parked in front of the Ott Cribbs Station at 620 West Division Street. The driver side door shows the Arlington City emblem with "Arlington Police" beside it. The small rear window has "806" underneath it. "Call 9-1-1 Emergency" is inside a circle which is placed next to the rear tail light and bumper. The roof has the red, white, and blue flashing lights attached. A push bumper is mounted on the front. 'Law and Order Magazine 1993' gave this cruiser third place in its Design Contest for its "very simple, clean design which looks good both day and night." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176437/
[APD officer running speed radar]
Photograph of an Arlington police officer in tan uniform standing in front of his patrol car checking for speeders on Division Street (near the Eastern Star Home). The speed radar monitor sits on the hood of his vehicle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176382/
[APD officers following tactical response, 1984]
Photograph of Arlington Police officers following tactical response. They are Dwayne Darter, Greg Waldron, and Jim McRobbie. This picture is taken from a doorway. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176321/
[APD ORBIS history in Arlington]
Photograph of a page from the 1984 Arlington Police Commemorative Book that explains the history of ORBIS, Arlington's first speed detection device. Along with the information, the page shows a picture taken by ORBIS of a moving vehicle, a picture of the signage that was posted on SPUR 303, and a picture of the ORBIS device that was placed along the edge of the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176445/
[APD ORBIS photo of a moving vehicle]
Photograph of an automobile in motion on the road, using ORBIS, Arlington's first speed detection device. A vehicle travelling faster than a preset speed triggers ORBIS to take a picture of the vehicle, including the front license area and the driver. The date, time, and vehicle speed is included on the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176325/
[APD patch. Current officer's patch, 2010-present]
Photograph of the current APD patch which was commissioned in 2009. The patch is outlined in first in black, then white and finally blue on a black background. "Police" is written in white at the top and is blocked in by a slightly arched blue line. The Arlington logo (the left leg of the "A" in blue, the right leg in red, and crossed by a white star) is in the center of the patch. Beneath the logo, "Arlington" is written in white. At the bottom of the patch, Texas is depicted in red and overwritten with "Texas" in white. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176346/
[APD patch. First supervisor patch with gold lettering and red trim]
Photograph of the first APD patch with gold for a supervisor. The patch is outlined in red with a dark blue background. "Arlington" is written in gold at the top and "Police" is in gold at the bottom. In the center of the patch is Texas in red with a star indicating Arlington and a circle indicating the metroplex. There are radio signals branching from the star. The first patch was used until 1986. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176342/
[APD patch. Non-supervisor patch with red lettering and red trim]
Photograph of the all red non-supervisor APD patch. The patch is outlined in red with a dark blue background. "Arlington" is written in red at the top and "Police" is in red at the bottom. In the center of the patch Texas is in red with a gold star indicating Arlington and a red circle indicating the metroplex. There are radio signals in red branching from the star. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176343/
[APD patch. Official officers patch, 1986-2010]
Photograph of the official APD patch, 1986-2010. The patch is outlined in black on a black background with an inner outline of gold. "Police" is written in gold at the top and "Arlington" is in gold at the bottom. In the center of the patch Texas is in red with a large gold star overlaying two green laurel branches that cross at the bottom and form an incomplete open circle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176345/
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST