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 Collection: Arlington Police Department Collection
[Arlington Police Officer Gary W. Shipp. Tactical and Special Operation Division Units]
Photograph of Officer Gary Shipp in a dress suit. Starting in 1972, Special Enforcement Officer Gary Shipp led in the development and operation of the APD's Tactical (SWAT) teams and later, in the mid 1980's, as a Lieutenant, the development and operation of the Special Operation Units. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176351/
[Arlington Police Officer Gary W. Shipp. Tactical and Special Operation Division Units, gray background]
Photograph of Officer Gary Shipp in a dress suit. Starting in 1972, Special Enforcement Officer Gary Shipp led in the development and operation of the APD's Tactical (SWAT) teams and later, in the mid 1980's, as a Lieutenant, the development and operation of the Special Operation Units. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176510/
[Arlington Police Officer Homer DeWolfe on motorcycle]
Photograph of Police Officer Homer DeWolfe sitting on his police motorcycle, a Harley Davidson. He is wearing a leather jacket over his dark uniform, police hat, sun glasses, and gloves. He appears to be holding his radio microphone. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176384/
[Arlington Police Officer Homer DeWolfe's motorcycle parked in Safety Town]
Photograph of Police Officer Homer DeWolfe's police motorcycle parked at the Six Flags Mall Safety Town. The motocycle is a Harley Davidson Electra Glide and was nicknamed "Honey Harley." Established in about 1978, Safety Town was a model town on the parking lot of Six Flags Mall where parents could take their children to learn road safety on their bicycles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176369/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, portrait]
Photograph of Officer James Evans Johnson dressed in a suit. Officer Johnson was killed in the line of duty by gunfire on November 23, 1930 while attempting to arrest a man for disturbing the peace. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176332/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, street renaming ceremony]
Photograph of a group gathered outside of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center for the dedication of a street that has been renamed in memory of Officer James Johnson. Three people, a police officer and two women, are holding a new street sign: "James Johnson St 200" (block). The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176431/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, street sign]
Photograph of a group of people looking at a renamed street sign, "James Johnson St 200" (block) which has been installed on the sign post with "W Division" street sign. The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176433/
[Arlington Police Officer James Long, APD's most tenured public servant]
Photograph of Police Officer Lt. James Long pictured twice; on the left in 1954 and on the right in 2002. A caption at the bottom says "James Long APD's Most Tenured Public Servant 50+ years Beginning in 1954 ID 0004." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176340/
[Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker, portrait]
Photograph of Reserve Officer Jerry J. Crocker in uniform. Officer Crocker was killed in the line of duty by vehicular assault on October 9, 1992. He and Officer Terry Lewis were killed when their patrol car was struck by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176334/
[Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's name being "rubbed" from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.]
Photograph of a person making a rubbing of Officer Jerry Crocker's name that is engraved on the wall of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington D.C. The memorial honors federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the safety and protection of the nation and its people. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176495/
[Arlington Police Officer Joseph T. Cushman, portrait]
Photograph of Corporal Joseph Thomas Cushman in dark blue uniform. Officer Cushman was killed in the line of duty by accidental gunfire on June 7, 2001 while performing training for a school shooting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176330/
[Arlington Police Officer Joseph T. Cushman, rememberence]
Photograph of a collection of items placed on a table as a rememberence of Officer Joseph "Joey" T. Cushman. Officer Cushman was killed in the line of duty by accidental gunfire on April 7, 2001 while performing a school shooting training exercise at Ousley Junior High. Items include an 8x10 photograph in uniform, a 5x7 group photograph, two badges, and awards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176386/
[Arlington Police Officer Joseph T. Cushman's name on the The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial (NLEOM) in Washington, D.C. with an APD patch beneath it]
Photograph of Officer Cushman's name on The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial (NLEOM) in Washington, D.C. Beneath his name is an APD patch. Officer Cushman was killed in the line of duty by accidental gunfire on June 7, 2001 while performing training for a school shooting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176412/
[Arlington Police Officer Joseph T. Cushman's parents placing his name on the memorial plaque for those who have died in the line of duty]
Photograph of Officer Cushman's parents, Jim and Jeri Cushman, placing their son's name on the memorial plaque for officers who have died in the line of duty. The plaque is located in the main lobby of the Ott Cribbs Police Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176499/
[Arlington Police Officer Keith Humphrey promoted to Sergeant]
Photograph of Officer Keith Humphrey being promoted to Sergeant. His wife is pinning his new badge onto his uniform and his daughter stands beside him watching the event. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176517/
[Arlington Police Officer Lee Eastman presenting a Citizen Certificate of Merit to a woman]
Photograph of Officer Lee Eastman presenting a woman a certificate from the police department titled "Citizen Certificate of Merit." They are standing outdoors beside a community service police van. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176393/
[Arlington Police Officer Martha Willbanks, APD's first female officer]
Photograph of Officer Martha Willbanks standing with her arm on the driver's door of an Arlington Police cruiser. This is a close-in photo of Officer Willbanks taken in about 1999 with the background of the building and foliage distorted. Officer Willbanks was Arlington's first female officer (she was called the city's only armed secretary) and her dress uniform hangs in the police museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176376/
[Arlington Police Officer Ray Hosack playing "Taps"]
Photograph of Police Officer Ray Hosack in Honor Guard uniform and Jonathan Spells (citizen volunteer) playing trumpets. They are standing on the side of a stage with a corner of the green curtain and the tip of a flag showing. Trumpets are usually played at funerals, awards ceremonies, and other official events. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176395/
[Arlington Police Officer Rex Gomillion playing "Taps"]
Photograph of Sgt. Rex Gomillion in Honor Guard uniform standing near a large building playing "Taps" on his trumpet. The event is at the State Peace Officer's Memorial in Austin. A newspaper photographer is standing slightly behind him taking his picture. People are standing behind them at the top of the stairs of the large building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176394/
[Arlington Police Officer Steve Foucault's story from the Arlington Citizen Journal, 1980]
Photograph of a newspaper article from the Arlington Citizen Journal about Officer Steve Foucault's move from a former relief pitcher for the Arlington Texas Rangers to an Arlington police officer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176358/
[Arlington Police Officer Teresa Ivy, APD's first African American woman officer]
Photograph of Police officer Teresa Ivy sitting at a desk with a telephone receiver to her ear. She is not in uniform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176470/
[Arlington Police Officer Terry L. Lewis in uniform]
Photograph of Officer Terry L. Lewis in dark blue uniform taken in a living room sitting with a United States map in the background. Officer Lewis was killed in the line of duty by vehicular assault on October 9, 1992. He and Reserve Officer Jerry Crocker were killed when their patrol car was struck by a drunk driver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176335/
[Arlington Police Officer Terry Lewis's casket carried by the Honor Guard during his funeral, newspaper clipping, 1992]
Photograph of Arlington Police Honor Guard carrying Officer Terry Lewis's casket during his funeral. Officer Lewis was killed in the line of duty by vehicular assault on October 9, 1992. It was taken by Gregg Ellman October 13, 1992 for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176368/
[Arlington Police Officers, 1948: J.W. Dunlop, Frank Kelly, Minor Moore, Hugh Robinson and S. (Oscar) Webster in front of a police car]
Photograph of Arlington police officers J. W. Dunlop, Frank Kelly, Minor Moore and Hugh Robinson with Oscar Webster (not from the police department) standing beside a 1948 Ford police car. The door of the car is decorated with a police officer's shield that is inscribed on the inside with the words "Police Dept. Arlington." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176306/
[Arlington Police Officers, 1960s]
Photograph of police officers taken in the early 1960s. Four officers in tan uniform are sitting at a table and two officers in tan uniform are standing behind them. A plain clothes man in a checked shirt is standing with the two officers on the back row. Back row L-R: Clayton Jordon, James Carmichael, Henry Alder. Front row L-R: Gene Fuqua, Bill Taylor, Gerald Baker, and Robert Burke. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176356/
[Arlington Police Officers Bill Wills, Ed Watson, and Bobby Wiggins, ca. 1960s]
Photograph of three policemen taken in the 1960s at the 401 West Main Street Police Station service window of (L-R) Desk Sergeants Bill Wills, Ed Watson, and Bobby Wiggins. All three men are in tan uniform. Above the window are two signs that say: "Complaints and Information" and "No Vehicle Inspection after 6:00 p.m." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176353/
[Arlington Police Officers Gary D. Harl and Terry L. Lewis, street signs]
Photograph of two street signs on a stop sign post that were placed in memory of police officers Gary Harl and Terry Lewis. The picture of the sign post is angled to show clearly the renamed streets: "Gary Harl St 500" (block) and "Terry Lewis St 200" (block). The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176432/
[Arlington Police Officers Howard Vaughan and G.A. Coke with Ed Pummill, 1950]
Photograph of Police Officers Howard Vaughan and G. A. Coke (smoking) in uniform are standing with Ed Pummill, Arlington's first volunteer fire chief. G. A. Coke was a Police Chief from April 7, 1924 to May of 1925 and again in 1926. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176302/
[Arlington Police Officers Howard Vaughn and Jack Hale on a police motorcycle]
Photograph of Two Arlington Police Officers, Howard Vaughn in front and Jack Hale in back, sitting on a police motorcycle parked in the middle of a downtown alley. A police car without a driver is parked behind them. Two other cars are parked in the distance and a pedestrian can be seen crossing the alley. The picture's caption reads "Howard Vaughn & Jack Hale 1950". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176341/
[Arlington police officers in casual clothes, ca 1980s]
Photograph of a group in an Arlington police training class in casual clothes arranged in two rows. The bottom row has five men sitting in chairs and the top row has eleven men (one in uniform) and one woman standing behind them. Names are not given. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176396/
[Arlington Police Officers Jim Roberts, Noel Pryor, Bob Esley, and James Barfield, 1950s]
Photograph of Jim Roberts sitting at the dispatcher's desk in front of the radio console with [L to R] Dispatcher Noel Pryor, Relief Sgt. Bob Easley, and Dispatcher James Barfield standing behind him. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176355/
[Arlington police officers on motorcycle, Fourth of July Parade, ca. 1981]
Photograph of police officers on motorcycles in the Arlington Fourth of July Parade, ca. 1981. A police van follows the motorcycles and a firetruck follows the van. Police Officer Charles Waybourn is on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176389/
[Arlington Police Officers Tom LeNoir and Eddie Thompson speaking to Chaplain Harold Elliott]
Photograph of two police cars parked side-by-side with three uniformed men standing between them having a conversation. Officer Tom LeNoir (pointing) and Officer Eddie Thompson are leaning against the car on the left and Chaplain Harold Elliott is facing them and leaning against the car on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176420/
[Arlington Police Station, 717 W. Main Street building entrance, 1964]
Photograph of the 717 W. Main St. Arlington Police Station. This station opened in 1964, having moved from the 401 W. Main St. location. The APD remained there until it moved into the new main station, the "Ott" Cribbs Public Safety Center in 1989. A vehicle is parked at the entrance of the building with a woman walking in front of it. A United States flag is flying behind the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176377/
[Arlington Police Station, 717 W. Main Street, building name close-up]
Photograph of a close-up view of the name on the wall of the police building at 717 W. Main Street. The name reads City of Arlington Police Dept. The building opened in 1964. The Police Department remained in this building until it moved to the new, three-story, Main Station on Division Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176415/
[Arlington Police Station, 717 W. Main Street, groundbreaking ceremony, view 1]
Photograph of the ground breaking ceremony for the new police station at 717 W. Main Street on October 10, 1964. Photograph shows Assistant Police Chief Herman Perry, Commissioner J. Ball, Commissioner C. Brown, Commissioner W. Sutton, City Manager A. Rollins, Mayor Tom Vandergriff and Police Chief A.B. "Ott" Cribbs holding the shovel. The Police Department remained in this building until it moved to the new, three-story, Main Station on Division Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176324/
[Arlington Police Station, 717 W. Main Street, groundbreaking ceremony, view 2]
Photograph of the ground breaking ceremony for the new police station at 717 W. Main Street on October 10, 1964. Photograph shows Assistant Police Chief Herman Perry, Commissioner J. Ball, Commissioner C. Brown, Commissioner W. Sutton, City Manager A. Rollins, Mayor Tom Vandergriff and Police Chief A.B. "Ott" Cribbs holding the shovel. The Police Department remained in this building until it moved to the new, three-story, Main Station on Division Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176392/
[Arlington Police Substation 1 described in the Arlington Citizen Journal, 1973, 1st view]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping from the Arlington Citizen Journal dated November 8, 1973 telling about Arlington's first police substation located on Little School Road. Arlington Substation 1 shared the facility with Fire Station 7. Substation 1 was also referred to as Little Road Station. A police motorcycle, a detective car, and a community service van are parked in the front parking lot and fire vehicles are parked inside the fire station garages. When the building opened in 1971, a portion of the building was used by the Police Department for a training center, community services, polygraph examinations, and traffic/motorcycle offices. Later in 1973, the section used by the police was dedicated as its first police substation with desk officers on duty 24 hours. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176357/
[Arlington Police Substation 1 described in the Arlington Citizen Journal, 1973, 2nd view]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping from the Arlington Citizen Journal dated November 8, 1973 telling about Arlington's first police substation located on Little School Road. Arlington Substation 1 shared the facility with Fire Station 7. Substation 1 was also referred to as Little Road Station. A police motorcycle, a detective car, and a community service van are parked in the front parking lot and fire vehicles are parked inside the fire station garages. When the building opened in 1971, a portion of the building was used by the Police Department for a training center, community services, polygraph examinations, and traffic/motorcycle offices. Later in 1973, the section used by the police was dedicated as its first police substation with desk officers on duty 24 hours. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176438/
[Arlington Reserve Officers at the Regional Reserve Officers Training Academy, ca. 1970s]
Photograph of a group taken in the late 1970s at the Regional Reserve Officers Training Academy at the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). The back row is the Reserve Officers from Arlington. It was taken outdoors with a white building covered in ivy in the background. The group is arranged on the sidewalk with the bottom group kneeling off the curb. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176390/
[Arlington Volunteer Police Chaplain Ronnie Armstrong, Sr. obituary]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper obituary of Arlington Volunteer Police Chaplain Ronnie Armstrong, Sr. who died in 1996. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176451/
[Arlington's first parking meter, 1950's]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping from the Fort Worth Star Telegram showing Arlington's first parking meter in the early 1950's. Police Capt. Howard Vaughan is showing Mrs. Marilyn Stovall, secretary to the city manager, how money is removed from the meters. The coins are released from the meter and dropped into a funnel tube that is connected to a secure container. The secure container is then returned to the police station. A brief history of the system is included on this photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176329/
[City of Arlington bicentennial business envelope, back image]
Back full color image of the City of Arlington bicentennial business envelope in celebration of the United States 200th anniversary. The back of the envelope is imprinted with various color drawings of images from Arlington's past history. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176308/
[City of Arlington bicentennial business envelope, front image]
Front full color images of the City of Arlington bicentennial business envelope in celebration of the United States 200th anniversary. The front of the envelope is imprinted with two emblems: the City of Arlington emblem and return address headed by the word Centennial and beneath that, the official U.S. 1776-1976 bicentennial emblem. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176309/
[City of Arlington document appointing Mrs. C.C. Rogers as the City Marshal of Arlington, view 1]
Photograph of a City of Arlington document detailing the appointment of Mrs. C.C. Rogers as City Marshal of Arlington in 1914 signed by P.F. McKee. The document is dated July 3rd, 1914 and states that she will be paid $5.00 a month. Listed on the document are the city officials and aldermen. Mrs. Rogers was the first female Arlington City Marshal. She was relieved of her duties September 10, 1914. The title of City Marshal was later changed to Police Chief when Pearl Rudd was appointed in 1915. Mrs. Rogers never became a police chief. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176399/
[City of Arlington document appointing Mrs. C.C. Rogers as the City Marshal of Arlington, view 2]
Photograph of a City of Arlington document detailing the appointment of Mrs. C.C. Rogers as City Marshal of Arlington in 1914 signed by P.F. McKee. The document is dated July 3rd, 1914 and states that she will be paid $5.00 a month. Listed on the document are the city officials and aldermen. Mrs. Rogers was the first female Arlington City Marshal. She was relieved of her duties September 10, 1914. The title of City Marshal was later changed to Police Chief when Pearl Rudd was appointed in 1915. Mrs. Rogers never became a police chief. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176472/
[East Arlington Police Service Center dedication, Chaplain Harold Elliott speaking]
Photograph of the Arlington East Police Station dedication with Chaplain Harold Elliott speaking at a podium on a raised platform. Seated on the platform with him are seven other people, six men and a woman. Left to right are: Police Chief David Kunkle, Congressman Dick Armey, Assistant Police Chief Theron Bowman, Mayor Richard Green, U.S. House Rep. Martin Frost, Council Member Paula Hightower, and the Priest from St. Matthews Catholic Church. The brown skirted platform is outside with a parking lot, trees, and a building in the background. East Arlington Police Service Center is also referred to as the East Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176379/
[East Arlington Police Service Center dedication, Chief David Kunkle speaking]
Photograph of the Arlington East Police Station dedication with Police Chief David Kunkle speaking at a podium on a raised platform. Seated on the platform with him are six other people, five men and a woman. Left to right are: vacant chair for Chief Kunkle, Congressman Dick Armey, Assistant Police Chief Theron Bowman, Mayor Richard Green, U.S. House Rep. Martin Frost, Council Member Paula Hightower, and the Priest from St. Matthews Catholic Church. The brown skirted platform is outside with a parking lot, trees, and a building in the background. East Arlington Police Service Center is also referred to as the East Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176378/
[East Arlington Police Service Center front entrance]
Photograph of a front entrance view of the East Arlington Police Service Center at 200 New York Ave. The building opened in 1996. This view also includes two patrol cars and a police van. The National, State, and City flags are on a single pole next to the brick sign and are flying at half mast. East Arlington Police Service Center is also referred to as the East Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176417/
[The Harold K. Elliott Police Museum official name plaque, 2004]
Photograph of a door plaque showing the official name of the Arlington police museum. The museum was founded in 1982 by Arlington Police Chaplain Harold K. Elliott when he began to collect items and store them in the attic of his Arlington home. By 1989, the items were moved to the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center. It was moved again to a more spacious room at the Police Training Center in March of 2007. When Chaplain Elliott retired in June of 2004, the museum was officially named the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in his honor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176490/