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 Collection: Arlington Police Department Collection
[Heroes' Park brick paver stone inscriptions, Brock]
Photograph of a close-up of a brick paver stone inscription located in Heroes' Park, 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone was funded by sponsor donations to benefit the park and be a permanent and meaningful way to honor loved ones and show support for the Police and Fire Departments. The inscripted stone shows an Arlington police badge, a running horse (possibly AHS Colt), the honorees name (P.J. Brock) and police badge number. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176267/
[Heroes' Park brick paver stone inscriptions, Elliott]
Photograph of a close-up of a brick paver stone inscription located in Heroes' Park, 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone was funded by sponsor donations to benefit the park and be a permanent and meaningful way to honor loved ones and show support for the Police and Fire Departments. The inscripted stone shows an Arlington police badge, the honorees name (Chaplain Harold Elliott) and police badge number. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176268/
[Heroes' Park "Compassion" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Compassion" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176276/
[Heroes' Park "Courage" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Courage" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176280/
[Heroes' Park dedication photograph]
Photograph of a press release for the dedication service for Heroes' Park in Arlington, Texas. The caption at the bottom of the picture says "Heroes' Park Dedication." Dedication was held May 17, 2008. The park is located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. Features include the "Remembrance Courtyard", "Stream of Life", and "We Remember Wall". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176426/
[Heroes' Park freestanding name sign, view 1]
Photograph of the Heroes' Park freestanding name sign. The sign reads "Heroes Park. City of Arlington Texas. 2100 West Green Oaks." Shown are the exterior lights and the garden at the base of the sign. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176281/
[Heroes' Park freestanding name sign, view 2]
Photograph of the Heroes' Park freestanding name sign. The sign reads "Heroes Park. City of Arlington Texas. 2100 West Green Oaks." Shown are the exterior lights, the garden at the base of the sign, the flag pole with a United States Flag flying behind it, and a general location of the sign placement in relation to the memorial park and the neighborhood as seen from the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176282/
[Heroes' Park "Honor" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the picture has the inscription "Honor" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176273/
[Heroes' Park "Integrity" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Integrity" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176279/
[Heroes' Park memorial dedication plaque]
Photograph of the memorial dedication plaque in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The cast bronze engraved plaque is attached to a stone pillar water feature at the entrance to the park. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. The title on the plaque reads "Heroes' Park" and following the title is the dedication. Also shown in the photograph are some of the inscriptions in the brick paver stones. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176266/
[Heroes' Park "Respect" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Respect" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176277/
[Heroes' Park "Responsibilty" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Responsibilty" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176278/
[Heroes' Park "Sacrifice" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Sacrifice" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176274/
[Heroes' Park "Service" character trait of a hero stone]
Photograph of one of the eight stone pillars that line the edge of the brick paved walkway in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. The stone pillar in the photograph has the inscription "Service" engraved on the top to show a character trait of a hero. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176275/
[Heroes' Park "We Remember Wall" and "Remembrance Courtyard", view 1]
Photograph of the "We Remember Wall" and the "Remembrance Courtyard" in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. At the top of the rememberance wall are the words "in the company of heroes" with a brass Arlington Fire Department emblem below and to the left and a brass Arlington Police Badge emblem below and to the right. Mounted in the center and underneath the writing are engraved brass plaques with the names of the fallen Arlington police officers and their End of Watch dates and fire fighters and their Last Alarm dates. The center of the courtyard shows the "Stream of Life", a water feature with a stone pillar fountain. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. The following people are honored on the wall: Don Hogg (fire) L.A. 11-19-1909; Craig Gordon Story (police) E.O.W. 1-13-2010; Craig Michael Hanking (police) E.O.W. 8-3-1994; Jerry J. Crocker (police) E.O.W. 10-9-1992; Rick G. Hosford, Jr. (fire) L.A. 9-1-2005; Ronny B. Snow (fire) L.A. 3-5-1985; Terry Lynn Lewis (police) E.O.W. 10-9-1992; Jillian Michelle Smith (police) E.O.W. 12-28-2010; Champ C. Barnes, Sr. (fire) L.A. 3-31-1951; Ronnie M. McAndrew (fire) L.A. 11-14-1990; James E. Johnson (police) E.O.W. 11-23-1930; Joseph Thomas Cushman (police) E.O.W.6-7-2001; Gary D. Harl (police) E.O.W. 7-16-1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176269/
[Heroes' Park "We Remember Wall" and "Remembrance Courtyard", view 2]
Photograph of the "We Remember Wall" and the "Remembrance Courtyard" in Heroes' Park located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. At the top of the rememberance wall are the words "in the company of heroes" with a brass Arlington Fire Department emblem below and to the left and a brass Arlington Police Badge emblem below and to the right. Mounted in the center and underneath the writing are engraved brass plaques with the names of the fallen Arlington police officers and their End of Watch dates and fire fighters and their Last Alarm dates. The center of the courtyard shows the "Stream of Life", a water feature with a stone pillar fountain. Heroes' Park is a tribute to the City of Arlington's Police and Fire Departments, and will also commemorate those fallen in the line of duty. The following people are honored on the wall: Don Hogg (fire) L.A. 11-19-1909; Craig Gordon Story (police) E.O.W. 1-13-2010; Craig Michael Hanking (police) E.O.W. 8-3-1994; Jerry J. Crocker (police) E.O.W. 10-9-1992; Rick G. Hosford, Jr. (fire) L.A. 9-1-2005; Ronny B. Snow (fire) L.A. 3-5-1985; Terry Lynn Lewis (police) E.O.W. 10-9-1992; Jillian Michelle Smith (police) E.O.W. 12-28-2010; Champ C. Barnes, Sr. (fire) L.A. 3-31-1951; Ronnie M. McAndrew (fire) L.A. 11-14-1990; James E. Johnson (police) E.O.W. 11-23-1930; Joseph Thomas Cushman (police) E.O.W.6-7-2001; Gary D. Harl (police) E.O.W. 7-16-1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176270/
[Heroes' Park "We Remember Wall" brass police badge emblem]
Photograph of the Heroes' Park "We Remember Wall" brass police badge emblem. The park is located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. At the top of the rememberance wall are the words "in the company of heroes" with the brass Arlington police badge emblem below and to the right. The picture shows the emblem placement under the word "heroes". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176271/
[Heroes' Park "We Remember Wall" brass police badge emblem, close-up of badge]
Photograph of the Heroes' Park "We Remember Wall" brass police badge emblem. The park is located at 2100 W. Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, Texas. At the top of the rememberance wall are the words "in the company of heroes" with the brass Arlington police badge emblem below and to the right. The picture shows a close-up of the emblem itself. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176272/
[Image of a 1916 Webley .455 pistol donated to the Arlington Police Museum by Deputy Chief Marion Rettig, 2004]
Photograph of a 1916 Webley .455 pistol donated to the Arlington Police Museum by APD Deputy Chief Marion Rettig in February 2004 just prior to his death from cancer. The image shows the pistol with a brief description below it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176256/
[Image of a bracelet, wrist band and newspaper cartoon by Dick Collier honoring Police Officer Craig G. Story]
Photograph of a silver bracelet, a wrist band, and a newspaper cartoon drawing by Dick Collier honoring Arlington Police Officer Craig G. Story who died in the line of duty January 13, 2010 when his department motorcycle collided with a school bus at an intersection near Arlington High School. Displayed is a silver wrist bracelet with Officer Story's face in the center and the words, "In Memory of, Officer Craig Story, [Arlington(?)] Texas Police" on the left of his face and the words, "E.O.W. Jan. 13, 2010, Badge 2117" and the APD shield on the right of his face. Displayed beneath the silver bracelet is a black rubber wrist band engraved in yellow with the words, "Officer Craig Story, #2117." Displayed at the top of the bracelet and wrist band is a framed newspaper cartoon drawing by Dick Collier of an Arlington Police Badge with a black stripe running through the center. The words, "Officer Craig Story APD 2002-2010" are below the badge. Two small cartoon characters stand in the lower right corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176241/
[Image of a case displaying the book "Mail Order Murder", a case solved by Detectives Tom LeNoir and Buddy Evans]
Photograph of a case displaying a paperback book "Mail Order Murder" written by Patricia Springer about the case solved by Detectives Tom LeNoir and Buddy Evans. To the left of the book, a two-sided folding frame holds their photos and names. To the right of the book, a framed placard states: Book about murder cases solved by Detectives Tom LeNoir and Buddy Evans 1994. Additional comments, not in the image, follow: "The book is the story of a case they solved called, MAIL ORDER MURDER. The suspect was convicted for the murder of only one of several wives he killed. He acquired his brides through mail order romance magazines. Arlington Police became involved in 1994. A jury convicted Jack Reeves in 1996 and sentenced him to 99 years in prison." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176206/
[Image of a case displaying the uniform worn by Martha Willbanks, Arlington's first female officer]
Photograph of a case displaying the tan uniform dress with badge and arm patch worn by Martha Willbanks, Arlington's first female officer. Officer Willbanks began her career in 1973. In 1986, the Department changed from a tan uniform to a dark blue uniform. Officer Willbanks died in 2001 of natural causes, with the rank of Lieutenant. On the lower left side of the display is a picture of Officer Willbanks in the blue uniform and on the lower right side of the display is a brief statement about her service as an officer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176214/
[Image of a commemorative stone from the Heroes' Park dedication, 2008]
Photograph of a commemorative stone from the dedication of Heroes' Park in Arlington Texas. Written in black on the stone is "Heroes' Park Dedication, May 17, 2008." Three emblems are placed below the words: an Arlington Fire Department emblem, an Arlington Police Badge emblem, and a City of Arlington emblem. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176252/
[Image of a commemorative stone from the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building]
Photograph of the commemorative stone from the dedication of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building at 620 W. Division Street. The bronze Texas shaped plate on the stone reads "Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center, 1989." Etched into the base of the stone is "Arlington, Texas." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176229/
[Image of a display honoring Arlington Police Officer Craig Hanking]
Photograph of a display of various objects belonging to and honoring Officer Craig M. Hanking who was killed in the line of duty in an automobile accident on August 3, 1994 while responding to a burglary call. Shown is Officer Hanking's black wallet containing his business card on the left and his ID badge #1443 on the right. His wrist watch sits below the wallet. At the top of the wallet is a bronze horse statue called a "caparisoned horse". The single riderless horse carries boots reversed in the stirrups in a military funeral. By tradition in military funeral honors, a caparisoned horse follows the casket of the deceased indicating that the warrior will ride no more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176242/
[Image of a newspaper article about the kidney donation of Arlington Police Officer P.J. Brock to co-worker Vern Griffin]
Photograph of a newspaper article written by Susan Schrock telling about Arlington Police Officer P. J. Brock donating a kidney to fellow employee, Vern Griffin. Vern Griffin worked as a property and evidence technician for the APD. The title of the article is "Kidney donor and co-worker are doing fine after surgery." The article includes color photographs of Officer Brock and Mr. Griffin. The surgery occured on September 9th, 2009. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176297/
[Image of a range finder used by APD sharpshooters, 1970s, side view]
Photograph of a range finder used in the early 1970s by the Arlington Police Department sharpshooters. A brief description placed below the object reads: "Range Finder for Sharpshooters." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176263/
[Image of a range finder used by APD sharpshooters, 1970s, top view]
Photograph of a range finder used in the early 1970s by the Arlington Police Department sharpshooters. A brief description placed below the object reads: "Range Finder for Sharpshooters." "Distran scale" is printed on one end of the range finder. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176264/
[Image of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial in Austin, Texas, side view]
Photograph of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial. The Texas Peace Officers' Memorial is a monument erected on the grounds of the Capitol Complex in Austin, Texas to recognize and honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Texas law enforcement and corrections officers who were killed in the line of duty. On May 10, 1999, law enforcement officers and the families of officers traveled to Austin for the Memorial dedication. This replica is on a wooden base with the words "Texas Peace Officers Memorial" printed on a bronze plate attached to the center of the base. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176235/
[Image of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial in Austin, Texas, top view]
Photograph of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial. The Texas Peace Officers' Memorial is a monument erected on the grounds of the Capitol Complex in Austin, Texas to recognize and honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Texas law enforcement and corrections officers who were killed in the line of duty. On May 10, 1999, law enforcement officers and the families of officers traveled to Austin for the Memorial dedication. This replica is on a wooden base with the words "Texas Peace Officers Memorial" printed on a bronze plate attached to the center of the base. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176236/
[Image of a Special Police Badge issued by Chief Ott Cribbs]
Photograph of a Special Police Badge issued by Chief Ott Cribbs. The badge is made of brass-like material in an oval shape with scrolling, a star, other figures and "Arlington Special Officer" stamped into the metal. The badge is on a block of wood with a placard behind. The placard reads: "In the late 1940's and early 1950's, when extra police officers were needed, Chief Ott Cribbs distributed these Special Officer Badges to individuals he could trust. The practice ceased in 1954 when a Reserve Police Unit was created." The badge and placard are resting on blue fabric. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176207/
[Image of a triangular folded U.S. Flag and seven shell casings]
Photograph of a triangular folded United States Flag with the field of stars showing and seven shell casings standing upright and placed in front of the flag. The seven shell casings represent a 21 gun salute honoring fallen officers. Three volleys from seven rifles constitute the 21 gun salute. The brass casings are then given to family members. (These shown are from practice rounds). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176253/
[Image of a United States Commemorative Capitol Police Badge and a triangular folded U.S. Flag]
Photograph of a full size commemorative badge from the United States Capitol Police and a triangular folded United States flag. The flag was flown over the Capitol building in Washington D.C. and is folded into a triangle with the field of stars showing. The Capitol Police Badge is displayed in front of the flag. The badge is kept in a hinged wallet. On the left side of the wallet is a picture of the Capitol Building Dome with the words "Washington D.C., The Nation's Capitol" at the bottom. The right side of the hinged wallet holds the United States Capitol Police Badge. The gold commemorative badge shows the U.S. Capitol Dome in the center with the word "United" on the left , "Sates" on the right and "Capitol" on the bottom. Other words on the badge are: "Lest we forget", "9-11", and "Police." Both items were presented to Chief Theron Bowman of the Arlington Police Department. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176225/
[Image of a United States Commemorative Capitol Police Badge and a triangular folded U.S. Flag, close-up view of badge]
Photograph of a full size commemorative badge from the United States Capitol Police. The badge is kept in a hinged wallet. On the left side of the wallet is a picture of the Capitol Building Dome with the words "Washington D.C., The Nation's Capitol" at the bottom. The right side of the hinged wallet holds the United States Capitol Police Badge. The gold commemorative badge shows the U.S. Capitol Dome in the center with the word "United" on the left , "Sates" on the right and "Capitol" on the bottom. Other words on the badge are: "Lest we forget", "9-11", and "Police." Both items were presented to Chief Theron Bowman of the Arlington Police Department. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176226/
[Image of a wall decorated with pictures of all the APD officers who have died in the line of duty]
Photograph of a wall that is decorated with photographs of all the Arlington Police Officers who have died in the line of duty. Shown are L-R: James Evans Johnson, Gary D. Harl, Terry Lynn Lewis, Jerry J. Crocker, Craig M. Hanking, Joseph Thomas Cushman, Craig M. Story, and Jillian M. Smith. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176244/
[Image of a wooden club / knife used for APD defensive training, 1950s-1970s]
Photograph of a carved wooden club / knife used for training by Arlington Police officers in the 1950s to 1970s. A brief description placed below the object states: "Club used in defensive training." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176261/
[Image of a wooden cross made in memory of Police Officer Craig G. Story]
Photograph of a wooden cross made in memory of Arlington Police Officer Craig G. Story who died in the line of duty January 13, 2010 when his department motorcycle collided with a school bus at an intersection near Arlington High School. The cross was sent to the APD by another police department. The cross has the APD shield engraved at the top. The cross arms of the cross say, "Rest in peace brother, Officer Craig Story." The bottom of the cross is engraved with "End of watch, Jan 13th, 2010." Also on the bottom of the cross beneath the writing is a black rubber wrist band honoring the officer with his name and badge number. An engraved white rose rests beneath the cross and a small medalian lies to the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176240/
[Image of an aluminum Glock training pistol used for APD training, 1980s]
Photograph of an aluminum Glock training pistol that was used at the Arlington Police Department Training Center in the mid 1980s. A brief description is placed below the pistol that states: "Early model Glock training pistol." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176258/
[Image of an aluminum training knife used for APD defensive training, 1980s]
Photograph of an aluminum training knife that was used at the Arlington Police Department Training Center in the mid 1980s. A brief description is placed below the knife that states: "Knife used in defensive training." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176259/
[Image of an APD Awards Statue presented to annual award recipients and retirees]
Photograph of an Arlington Police Department Awards Statue presented to annual award recipients and retirees. The statue is a bronze policeman in uniform standing on a wooden pedestal. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176300/
[Image of an APD badge with mourning cover and a police Medal Of Honor medalian]
Photograph of a display of an Arlington Police badge with a mourning cover and a Police Medal Of Honor medalian from the American Police Hall of Fame. The badge shows a black cloth strip placed over the center of the badge. The display reads, "BADGE COVER. Worn in honor of officers who have died in the line of duty. Cover is traditionally worn from the time of death until 2400 hours after the funeral." The badge cover and medal are both in honor of fallen officers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176243/
[Image of an APD Chaplain Super Bowl badge, 2011]
Photograph of an Arlington Police Super Bowl badge made for Chaplain Harold Elliott. It was worn from November 2010 until February 2011, after the NFL Super Bowl XLV event held at Cowboy Stadium. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176287/
[Image of an APD Charioteers plaque, 1954-1960]
Photograph of a Charioteers plaque. A group of young people called the Charioteer Knights were in a hot rod club sponsored by Junior Achievement, Optimist Club and the Arlington Police Department. The Charioteers were used as a method of keeping young people off the streets and still letting them enjoy their cars. It was effective in giving them a place to drag race and show off their automobiles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176231/
[Image of an APD helmet with face shield]
Photograph of a gold colored police helmet with a face shield. All APD officers were assigned helmets and shields during the 1960's student unrest demonstrations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176239/
[Image of an APD laser speed detection unit]
Photograph of Arlington Police Department's first laser speed detection units. The brand name on this unit is Marksman LTI 20-20. This particular unit, in its carrying case, was unintentionally left on top of a patrol car and fell into a deep mud puddle. It remained lost for several years. When the puddle finally dried up, it was found and returned to the Department. It was obviously unusable. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176234/
[Image of an APD motorcycle officer's uniform on a mannequin in the police museum, close-up view]
Photograph of a mannequin sitting in a chair wearing a motorcycle officer's uniform. The tan uniform was used from the mid 1950s to 1986. In 1986, the Department changed to the dark blue police uniform. Also included in the ensemble is a white helmet, sunglasses, high-top black boots, a black tie, and the APD shoulder patch and breast badge. The mannequin and surrounding items are located in the Arlington police museum. Shown also is the old jail door from the Main Station on 717 W. Main Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176223/
[Image of an APD motorcycle officer's uniform on a mannequin in the police museum, wide shot view]
Photograph of a mannequin sitting in a chair wearing a motorcycle officer's uniform. The tan uniform was used from the mid 1950s to 1986. In 1986, the Department changed to the dark blue police uniform. Also included in the ensemble is a white helmet, sunglasses, high-top black boots, a black tie, and the APD shoulder patch and breast badge. The mannequin and surrounding items are located in the Arlington police museum. Shown also is the old jail door from the Main Station on 717 W. Main Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176224/
[Image of an APD mourning band and badge cover]
Photograph of black arm band that was worn by Arlington Police officers as a symbol of mourning after an officer was killed in the line of duty. The arm band was later replaced by the black badge cover. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176295/
[Image of an APD saddle blanket used by the Mounted Patrol]
Photograph of a horse saddle blanket used by the Arlington Police Department when they had a Mounted Patrol. The horse patrol was begun in 1985 under the leadership of Chief David Kunkle. It was disbanded in 1989. The blanket is dark blue with a gold trim and the initals "APD" are monogramed in a corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176230/
[Image of an APD speed radar unit, 1960-1970s]
Photograph of a later model of an Arlington Police Department speed radar unit. This model was used in the late 1960s and 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176232/