You limited your search to:

 Collection: Arlington Police Department Collection
[Image of an APD two-way radio used in the briefing room by Sergeants]
Photograph of a vintage GE two-way radio base station and desk microphone used by Sergeants to monitor and direct patrol activity while in the briefing room. (Years of service to be determined) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176298/
[Image of an Arlington Auxiliary Police Unit armband, 1930s]
Photograph of a four-inch-wide blue armband with the word "Police" stitched in white worn by local Arlington civilians who assisted the police in the early 1930s. They were not allowed to wear police uniforms or carry guns. No badges were provided for these individuals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176215/
[Image of an Arlington police car bubble light, 1960-1970s]
Photograph of the red Bubble Light used on Arlington patrol cars from the early 1960s to the late 1970s. The unit set on a metal bar that ran across the top of the patrol car. It flashed a red light when activated. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176218/
[Image of an earlier APD motorcycle helmet]
Photograph of a white motorcycle helmet used by various police officers of the Arlington Police Motorcycle Unit during the time they served. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176233/
[Image of an early APD tactical shield, view 1]
Photograph of an early tactical shield that was used by the Arlington Police Department to defend the user. This tactical shield was a hand-held rectangular shaped sheet of metal with a thin eye slot hole for vision. The protective shield was most necessary in situations where law enforcement tactical team members had little or no cover. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176237/
[Image of an early APD tactical shield, view 2]
Photograph of an early tactical shield that was used by the Arlington Police Department to defend the user. This tactical shield was a hand-held rectangular shaped sheet of metal with a thin eye slot hole for vision. The protective shield was most necessary in situations where law enforcement tactical team members had little or no cover. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176238/
[Image of an imprinted APD badge on a shirt]
Photograph of an imprinted APD badge on a shirt worn by officers at the Training Center. Above the badge is the word "Staff." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176289/
[Image of an old hard drive used by the APD Communications Division, ca. 1970s?]
Photograph of an old hard drive from a computer system used by the APD Communications Division, ca. 1970s. It was later replaced with a computer chip. (years of service to be determined) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176299/
[Image of antique APD Chief Badge, on blue drape]
Photograph of a silver frame containing an antique APD Chief Badge with an information placard below the badge. The badge is a six pointed star constructed from silver-like metal with "Chief Arlington Police" pressed in and blackened. The badge is pinned on gold felt. The placard that is below it reads: "Antique Arlington Police Badge. Date of Use Unknown." The frame is on a blue drape background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176209/
[Image of antique APD Chief Badge, on red fabric]
Photograph of a silver frame containing an antique APD Chief Badge with an information placard below the badge. The badge is a six pointed star constructed from silver-like metal with "Chief Arlington Police" pressed in and blackened. The badge is pinned on gold felt. The placard that is below it reads: "Antique Arlington Police Badge. Date of Use Unknown." The frame is on a red fabric background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176210/
[Image of APD ceremonial scissors]
Photograph of ceremonial scissors used to cut the ribbon at the opening of the East, West, South Stations, and Heroes Park. The scissors are fairly large in gold-like metal and are lying on red fabric. East Station opened in 1996, West Station opened in 2003, South Station opened in 2008, and Heroes Park was dedicated in 2007. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176211/
[Image of APD epaulets]
Photograph of various epaulets worn by the Arlington Police Department. To the right of each epaulet is an explanation of its meaning. An epaulette is a type of ornamental shoulder piece or decoration used as insignia of rank by armed forces and other organizations. It is usually worn on dress or ceremonial uniforms. APD no longer wears epaulets. The epaulets shown are: Training; Reserves; Support Services; Traffic; Patrol; Tactical; Youth Services, D.A.R.E., School Resource. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176294/
[Image of APD's first hand-held radio]
Photograph of the first Arlington Police Department hand-held radio (years of service to be determined). The name on the unit is "GE Master." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176292/
[Image of APD's first MDT (mobile data terminal) computer]
Photograph of the first MDT (mobile data terminal) used in Arlington police vehicles. MDT was a computerized device used to communicate with a central dispatch office. It displayed relevant information to the officer on a viewing screen and provided a keyboard for entering information. The MDTs were first installed in APD police cars in 1987. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176296/
[Image of APD's first speed radar unit, 1950s]
Photograph of the Arlington Police Department's first speed radar units. The official name on the unit is Radar Speedalyzer. It was used in the 1950s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176227/
[Image of APD's second series hand-held radio]
Photograph of the second series of a hand-held radio used by the Arlington Police Department (years of service to be determined). The name on the unit is "Motorola." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176293/
[Image of Arlington Police Chief "Ott" Cribbs and Police Chief David Kunkle's name plates]
Photograph of two name plates. Arlington Police Chief A.B. "Ott' Cribbs's name plate was used on his desk. Arlington Police Chief David Kunkle's name plate was on his office door. Chief Cribbs served as chief from 1934 to 1971 and Chief Kunkle served as chief from 1985 to 1999. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176228/
[Image of Arlington Police Chief Ott Cribb's personal scrapbook, view 1]
Photograph of Arlington Police Chief A.B. "Ott" Cribbs personal scrapbook. Chief Cribbs started his career as a police officer in 1926 and was appointed Police Chief in 1934, a position he held for the next 37 years. He retired in 1971. This scrapbook records such events as his encounter with Clyde Barrow (of the "Bonnie and Clyde" outlaw couple). This image shows his picture on the left page and various newspaper clippings glued onto the right page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176220/
[Image of Arlington Police Chief Ott Cribb's personal scrapbook, view 2]
Photograph of Arlington Police Chief A.B. "Ott" Cribbs personal scrapbook. Chief Cribbs started his career as a police officer in 1926 and was appointed Police Chief in 1934, a position he held for the next 37 years. He retired in 1971. This scrapbook records such events as his encounter with Clyde Barrow (of the "Bonnie and Clyde" outlaw couple). This image shows his picture on the left page and various newspaper clippings glued onto the right page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176221/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Gary Harl's handcuffs and pocket knife]
Photograph of the handcuffs and pocket knife carried by Officer Gary Harl when he was killed in the line of duty while making a "routine" traffic stop. He was killed by gunfire on July 16, 1975 when he stopped a man who had been driving a stolen motorcycle. The two men were sitting in the front seat of Officer Harl's police car when the motorcycle driver suddenly shot him. This image shows the handcuffs and the pocket knife with a brief description of the event placed above them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176249/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Howard Vaughn's brass whistle]
Photograph of a brass whistle used by Officer Howard Vaughn beginning in 1950. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176262/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer James E. Johnson's cartridge holder, whistle, and pen]
Photograph of the cartridge holder, whistle, and pen used by Officer James E. Johnson. Officer Johnson was killed by gunfire on November 23, 1930 while attempting to arrest a man for disturbing the peace. He was the first Arlington Police Officer to die in the line of duty. A brief description of the items is placed below them. (date in photograph is incorrect) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176250/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's pistol, view 1]
Photograph of the pistol carried by Reserve Officer Jerry J. Crocker the night he died in the line of duty October 9, 1992. Officer Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis were killed when their patrol car was struck broadside by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. This image shows the pistol with Officer Crocker's name plate above it and a brief description of the event below it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176246/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's pistol, view 2]
Photograph of the pistol carried by Reserve Officer Jerry J. Crocker the night he died in the line of duty October 9, 1992. Officer Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis were killed when their patrol car was struck broadside by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. This image shows the pistol with Officer Crocker's name plate above it and a brief description of the event below it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176248/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Joey Cushman's flashlight and portable radio transceiver]
Photograph of a flashlight and portable radio transceiver that belonged to Officer Joey Cushman who died in the line of duty June 7, 2001. Officer Cushman was killed by accidental gunfire while performing training for a school shooting. A brief description of the item is included in the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176251/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Minor Moore's badge, slapper and blackjack]
Photograph of Police Officer Minor Moore's police badge, black leather blackjack and leather slapper. He carried these items when he was an officer for the APD from 1941-1962. These items are donated on loan to the Arlington Police Museum by his son. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176257/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Terry L. Lewis's pistol]
Photograph of the pistol carried by Officer Terry L. Lewis the night he died in the line of duty October 9, 1992. Officer Terry Lewis and Officer Jerry Crocker were killed when their patrol car was struck broadside by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. This image shows the pistol with a brief description of the event placed above the pistol. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176247/
[Image of Arlington police tactical equipment, ca. 1970s]
Photograph of a shelf displaying early tactical equipment. The field phones were military surplus given to Arlington Police Department in the early 1970s. The face protector was primarily worn during dangerous entries. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176217/
[Image of case displaying items from the shooting of Officer Doug Ligon, view 1]
Photograph of a case displaying items from the shooting of Officer Doug Ligon. The case contains news articles with descriptive placards framed against the back of the case, the assault rifle used by the assailant standing upright by the stock, the bullet encased in accetate, the bullet casing in an accetate frame with placard, and a smaller frame with what looks like a description of the case contents. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176203/
[Image of case displaying items from the shooting of Officer Doug Ligon, view 2]
Photograph of a case displaying items from the shooting of Officer Doug Ligon. The case contains news articles with descriptive placards framed against the back of the case, the assault rifle used by the assailant standing upright by the stock, the bullet encased in accetate, the bullet casing in an accetate frame with placard, and a smaller frame with what looks like a description of the case contents. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176204/
[Image of case with items from shooting of Officer Buddy Evans]
Photograph of case containing items from the shooting of Officer Buddy Evans. There are two frames. The largest frame holds the bullet with a placard describing the events: "Bullet that struck Officer Buddy Evans 2-26-1988. Evans observed a car not moving through the signal light at Abram and Collins Street. When he approached the woman driver, she shot him. She had been waiting for an officer to come by so she could kill him. The bullet lodged in Officer Evans vest, only injuring him." The smaller frame holds a picture of Officer Evans and his name. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176208/
[Image of Detective James McSpadden's Investigative Review notebook on the Amber Hagerman Homicide, view 1]
Photograph of Amber Hagerman Homicide Investigative Review note book kept by Detective James McSpadden. The notebook is lying on blue fabric. Additional comments: Amber’s death in 1996 led to President George W. Bush signing the AMBER Alert into law in 2003. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176212/
[Image of Detective James McSpadden's Investigative Review notebook on the Amber Hagerman Homicide, view 2]
Photograph of Amber Hagerman Homicide Investigative Review note book kept by Detective James McSpadden. The notebook is lying on blue fabric. Additional comments: Amber’s death in 1996 led to President George W. Bush signing the AMBER Alert into law in 2003. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176222/
[Image of frame containing Junior Police Badges with description]
Photograph of frame containing two different Junior Police Badges with description. Futher comments not in the image follow: "These badges were issued in the 1940’s. A few citizens were frequent riders with the Arlington Police. Riders did not carry guns, but did wear these badges when on patrol. Badges were returned to desk officer at the end of shift. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176205/
[Image of items recognizing Chaplain Harold Elliott, founder of the Arlington Police Museum]
Photograph of items recognizing Chaplain Harold Elliott as founder of the Police Museum in 1982. The museum was later named for him on his retirement in June 2004. Items include his picture and name with caption reading: "The Police Museum was officially named after its founder and curator, Chaplain Harold Elliott, in June 2004; his parking sign which reads: "Police Chaplain"; a laminated official museum post card with his picture; his badge; and desk set with name plate and police coffee mug. Harold Elliott became a volunteer chaplain for the APD in 1974. In 1982, he became the APD's first full-time police chaplain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176213/
[Image of seven shell casings]
Photograph of a close-up of seven shell casings. The seven shell casings represent a 21 gun salute honoring fallen officers. Three volleys from seven rifles constitute the 21 gun salute. The brass casings are then given to family members. (These shown are from practice rounds). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176254/
[Image of the APD Millennium badge]
Photograph of the APD Millennium badge. The gold Millennium badge is imprinted with the words "Arlington," "Police," "1884-2000," "Texas" (printed inside a white baseball), a bronze colored front view of the Texas Rangers Stadium, and the word "Officer." The badge was worn from November 1999 until January 1, 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176288/
[Image of the APD night watchman's clock]
Photograph of the Night Watchman's clock used by Chief Cribbs for the Arlington Police Department in the mid 1930s. It contained a roll of paper that recorded the time and location of the watchman when he inserted a special key from the location he was checking. A special key was housed at each location. It continued in use until the early 1950s at which time officers were required to hand check and note the locked doors to businesses. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176219/
[Image of the Chief's Coin created by Arlington Police Chief Theron Bowman in 2003]
Photograph of the front and back view of a special gold coin created by Arlington Police Chief Theron Bowman in 2003. The coin is presented by the Chief to any personnel for outstanding service deserving immediate recognition. A picture-framed description of the coin is placed above the front and back views of the coin. The description reads: "Chief''s Coin. A special coin created by Chief Theron Bowman. Presented to officers and professional personnel for outstanding service, retirements, etc. Begun in 2003." One side of the completely gold coin has a replica of an Arlington police badge in the center with the words "Accountability," "Honor", and "Teamwork" engraved around the edges. The other side of the gold coin has a full color replica of an Arlington police patch in the center with the words "Service," "Leadership," and "Integrity" engraved around the edges in gold. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176265/
[Image of the pistol used to murder Police Officer Gary D. Harl]
Photograph of the 38 caliber pistol used to murder Police Officer Gary Harl. Officer Harl was killed in the line of duty while making a "routine" traffic stop. He was killed by gunfire on July 16, 1975 when he stopped a man who had been driving a stolen motorcycle. The two men were sitting in the front seat of Officer Harl's police car when the motorcycle thief suddenly shot him. Later the same night the culprit ended his own life with this same pistol. Attached to the pistol is a Department ID tag. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176255/
[Image of the Rembrandt portrait camera from the Arlington Police Museum]
Photograph of the 4x5 Rembrandt Portrait camera that is in the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176430/
[Image of three baseball caps made for the Arlington Police Department]
Photograph of three baseball caps made for the Arlington Police Department displayed on a blue satin cloth. The dark blue cap on the left was the first baseball cap created in 1983. The blue and gold trimmed patch on the cap matched the uniform shoulder patch. The middle or second baseball cap is the Memorial Cap worn at various memorial ceremonies held in Tarrant County during Memorial Week. Police Memorial Day is May 15th of each year. It is dark blue with gold emblem and decorations. The third dark blue cap on the right was created in 1986 to match the uniform shoulder patch that was created to replace the earlier patch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176216/
[Image of three pistols used for APD firearms training, 1950s-1970s]
Photograph of three 33 caliber pistols mounted on 38 caliber frames. These pistols were used by Arlington Police officers for firearms training in the 1950s to the early 1970s. A brief description placed below the pistols states: "22 Caliber Pistols Mounted on 38 Caliber Frame. These three pistols were used for firearms qualification on the range. Located in the basement of the Main Station at 717 W. Main. Range was closed due to excessive lead levels." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176260/
[Image of two wrist bands honoring Officer Jillian Smith and Officer Craig Story]
Photograph of two black rubber wrist bands honoring Officer Jillian Smith and Officer Craig Story. One of the black wrist bands is engraved with pink letters that read "Officer J. Smith, #2650" and the other black wrist band is engraved with yellow letters that read "Officer Craig Story, #1443." Officer Jillian Smith was shot and killed in the line of duty by gunfire on December 28, 2010 after responding to an apartment for a report of a domestic dispute. Officer Craig Story was killed in the line of duty in a motorcycle accident on January 13, 2010 when his department motorcycle collided with a school bus at an intersection near Arlington High School. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176245/
[Newspaper article about the street dedications for fallen Arlington police officers, part 1]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article written by Jessamy Brown. The article is about the street naming dedications for Arlington police officers James Johnson, Gary Harl, Jerry Crocker, and Terry Lewis who died in the line of duty. It includes brief statements from family members of the slain officers. There are three pictures in the article. The largest is of Luther Johnson with a photo of his brother Officer James Johnson who died in 1930. Two other smaller pictures are photos of Officer Jerry Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176434/
[Newspaper article about the street dedications for fallen Arlington police officers, part 2]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article written by Jessamy Brown. The article is about the street naming dedications for Arlington police officers James Johnson, Gary Harl, Jerry Crocker, and Terry Lewis who died in the line of duty. It includes brief statements from family members of the slain officers. It shows a map of the street locations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176435/
[Newspaper clipping about Arlington Police Officers receiving awards, 1973]
Photograph of an Arlington Citizens Journal newspaper clipping about five police officers recieving awards for their achievements. The title caption under the picture is "Top Cops." Those listed in the clipping are: Richard Love, Ben Bounds, Lionel (Lee) Eastman, John Faltynski, and Bob Callas. Awards given were watches or .38 pistols. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176458/
[Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building front entrance, 1989]
Photograph of A.B. "Ott" Cribbs Public Safety Center at the corner of Cooper & Division Streets in 1989. The three-story facility is accompanied by a jail with 98-inmate capacity. It cost $8.9 million to construct the 88,000 square foot building. It is also known as the [New] Main Station or North Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176361/
[Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building Open House cartoon, newspaper clipping,1989]
Photograph of a cartoon drawn by Susan Gaylord Buxton for the Ft. Worth Star Telegram encouraging people to come to the Open House of the new Ott Cribbs Public Safety Building. Police Chief Kunkle and Fire Chief Strickland are holding a banner stating the date and time of the event. Balloons with captions tell of various activities and attractions. The name of the cartoon is "The Front Line." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176362/
[Police Training Center building entrance]
Photograph of the front of the City of Arlington Police Training Center located at 6000 West Pioneer Parkway. Originally the training center was housed at the Substation on Little Road. In 1980 the Training Center moved from the Little Road Station to the new facility. The APD operates its own Police Academy out of the Training Center. The first class graduated in June 1990. At the front drive is one of the street signs made to honor a fallen officer. This street sign is named "Joey Cushman Dr." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176285/