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 Collection: The Civil War and its Aftermath: Diverse Perspectives
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, June 30, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, June 30, 1863]

Date: June 30, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara declaring his love and stating the importance of communication between them. He includes news of his health; troop locations and news of the war.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, July 12, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, July 12, 1863]

Date: July 12, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara informing her of his improving health; the continuing problems of sickness among the troops; the movement of the troops; a description of how his wife can treat a problem with her face; and news of the war.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, July 18, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, July 18, 1863]

Date: July 18, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara in which he tries to set the record straight on his relationships with other women before their marriage. He was also concerned about the corn crop and the state of the garden. He writes down what he has read about President Lincoln's recently published proclamation that would take freed slaves and allow them to fight in the northern army (possibly the Emancipation Proclamation).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 7, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 7, 1863]

Date: August 7, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara requesting that she look after the orchard, plant grapes, and care for the garden. He states his interest in teaching his daughters how to garden and "kitchen education" before other branches of learning. He describes his health and says that he has not lost any of his sick soldiers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 9, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 9, 1863]

Date: August 9, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara in which tells her how often he has been receiving mail from her; troop movements and his speculation on what the Northern Army will do; how the populace is treated when the U. S. Army moves into their territory; illness among the men; his health; and seeds for his garden.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 28, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, August 28, 1863]

Date: August 28, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara describing the toll that sickness has taken on the Confederate troops; troop movements; demoralized troops deserting and going home; his personal health; and comments on family news.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, September 3, 1863]

[Letter from David Fentress to his wife Clara, September 3, 1863]

Date: September 3, 1863
Creator: Fentress, David
Description: Letter written by David Fentress to his wife Clara seeking to reassure her about his recovering health. He updates her on the sickness among the troops. He also comments on the dispirited populace and troops since the fall of Vicksburg.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 6, 1859]

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 6, 1859]

Date: September 6, 1859
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Description: Letter is from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing news from Bolivar, Tennessee and it includes: sending Kate off to school in Nashville,Maud's feelings about her children growing up, receiving Mary Tate's letter from White Sulphur Springs, Virginia, a dialogue about her stolen chickens,a conversation about Sallie starting school with Miss Hunt as her teacher and information about Jimmie and Willie's schooling, news about the weather,news about 'Aunt Mag' and her trip to Austin,a discussion about receiving no information on Wallace and his safe arrival,a dialogue about 'the babies dress and bonnets', and town news from Bolivar.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 26, 1859 ]

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to David W. Fentress, September 26, 1859 ]

Date: September 26, 1859
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Description: Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her son David discussing Jimmie and Mary's return from their travels and their change in plans to board with Mr. Miller instead of Maud, Jimmie's financial proposition to exchange bottom land for David's lot, the town physician's move to Nashville, a financial proposition from Maud to purchase Sallie which is David's horse if Neely does not purchase her, Maud's preparations for Jimmie's party, a discussion about David's failed crops, a dialogue on the raising of stock prices, Maud's purchase of a cow for $25 from Bright, a dialogue concerning Maud's loss of cows, hogs, and a horse this year, news about sending gifts for the baby, and news about Kate's progress in boarding school.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her David Fentress, December 25, 1860]

[Letter from Maud C. Fentress to her David Fentress, December 25, 1860]

Date: December 25, 1860
Creator: Fentress, Maud C.
Description: Letter from M.(Maud)C. Fentress to her son David regarding the separation of the southern states from the union; the sale of slaves (Barb and her two children); breeding and care of a female slave named Eliza; hiring out of a slave; the capture and hanging of an abolitionist; and the health of those around her.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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