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 Language: Spanish
 Collection: José L. Castillo Photograph Collection
Academia Infantil
This article deals with the creation of a soccer youth academy in the city of Dallas. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91134/
[Administrators pose in front of a mural at the Cesar Chavez School]
Part of the administrative team of the Cesar Chavez elementary school of Fort Worth, from left to right: Alicia Menchaca, Christine Gardiner, Lina Aguillon, Lourdes Martinez, Mary Jane Cantu, Teresa Brown, Nora Barron, and Betty Delarosa. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23883/
[Adults and children make up crowd of protesters]
Families take part in a protest on Saturday in Dallas against the anti-immigration measures which would endanger undocumented immigrants. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23282/
[Anti-immigration protest march]
This article mostly contains captions of photographs of a Minuteman Project March held in Denton .Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91099/
[Aracelis Acevedo is one of the reporters on The Latino Reporter]
Aracelis Acevedo of Puerto Rico, a graduate of the Department of Journalism at the University of Puerto Rico, is one of the students involved in the publication of a newspaper that circulates every day for the Twenty-Third Annual Convention of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) that is carried out until June 18 in Fort Worth, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23711/
[Aracelis Acevedo works on a computer as she writes for The Latino Reporter]
Aracelis Acevedo of Puerto Rico, a graduate of the department of Journalism at the University of Puerto Rico, is one of the students involved in the publication of a newspaper that circulates every day for the Twenty-Third Annual Convention of the national Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) that is carried out until June 18 in Fort Worth, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23710/
Artistas hispanos exhiben obras en Festival de Arte de Fort Worth
This article describes the the Festival de Arte in Fort Worth where a large number of Hispanic artists sell their artwork. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91120/
[Arturo Violante in front of display]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22946/
[Arturo Violante in front of Viva Dallas 2005 display]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22947/
[Arturo Violante standing in front of Viva Dallas booth]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22945/
[Arturo Violante standing in front of Viva Dallas sign]
Arturo Violante is the former President of the Greater Dallas Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22944/
[At the reception desk]
A receptionist and patient converse while in the background there is a flurry of activity. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23545/
[Big Brothers, Big Sisters]
This article deals with the positive impact that Carlos Linares and the organization Big Brothers, Big Sisters had on a younger individual. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91145/
[Bilingual sign]
A sign that read "Viva Collin County, Hispanic Business Expo." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23991/
[Boy receiving food from "Bobby's Fajitas" stand]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24573/
[Boys engage in soccer drills]
An Academia Infantil Legendarios staff member instructs a boy on proper technique while the rest of the boys observe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22352/
[Boys engage in soccer drills]
Young boys engage in soccer drills with an Academia Infantil Legendarios staff member. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22351/
[Bumper stickers and posters displayed at Cesar Chavez School]
Posters of Cesar Chavez and bumper stickers with the motto of the United Farm Workers (Yes, it can be done) are on display at the Cesar Chavez School in Fort Worth, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23866/
[Buttons promoting a national holiday in honor of Cesar Chavez]
Button promoting a national holiday in honor of Cesar Chavez are on display at the Cesar Chavez School in Fort Worth, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23867/
[Cameramen and reporters gather to cover protestors]
Cameramen and reporters work to gather information and images of a crowd of protesters and their children. The protest was against the anti-immigration proposals being debated in the U. S. Senate. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23277/
Campaña Antidrogas
This article deals with the intention of dimishing prescription drug abuse among Hispanic youth. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91125/
Caridades Catolicas
This article deals with the positive impact that the organization Catholic Charities has on the Hispanic community and how its work might be impacted by federal legislation. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91136/
[Carlos Ugarte at event]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22921/
[Carlos Ugarte at podium]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22923/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking at a podium]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22922/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking at an event]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22926/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking into a microphone]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22927/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking into microphone at event]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22919/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking into microphone with hand raised]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22924/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking with hand raised]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22925/
[Carlos Ugarte speaking with thumb raised]
Carlos Ugarte is the senior public health adviser for the National Council of La Raza, a Hispanic advocacy group. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22920/
[Cathedral Guadalupe]
Immigration protesters waving American flags pass a "Cathedral Guadalupe" sign and the Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe (Cathedral Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe) of Dallas in the background. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23168/
Centenares de personas protestan en Dallas contra amnistia
This article deals with the protest that occured on April 08, 2006 when 500 people gathered to demonstrate against granting amnesty to undocumneted workers. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91116/
[Cesar Chavez March]
This article deals with a march commerating Cesar Chavez Day at a school in Fort Worth. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91110/
[Chanting protesters with signs and American flags]
A large group of immigration protesters chant, hold protest signs in English and Spanish, and wave American flags. According to the Dallas Police Department, at least 100,000 people marched in the most well-attended civil movement in the history of Dallas. The protesters demanded the legalization of Hispanic undocumented immigrants, estimated to be about twelve million in the United States. The so-called "mega march" was carried out to demand immigrant amnesty as members of the U.S. Congress debated immigration reform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23171/
[Children hold up sign during protest]
Children hold up a sign in Dallas, Texas, during protest against anti-immigration measures which would endanger undocumented immigrants. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23281/
[Children participate in the march]
Children take part in a protest march in Dallas, Texas. Signs and banners,in Spanish and English, are carried by the adults. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23006/
Ciudadania
This article describes the intense emotions that people felt as they became citizens of the United States during a naturalization ceremony in Arlington. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91114/
Clases duales
This article deals with dual language insturction in the third grade at Crockett Elementary. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91137/
[Clinica Albert Galvan]
The article deals with the Clinica Albert Galvan which provides health services mostly to lower income and undocumented patients. Both the original Spanish article and the English translation are included. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91107/
[Close-up of a Ventanilla de Salud employee pointing out brochure information to a visitor]
A Ventanilla de Salud employee points out information in one of many Spanish-language brochures, while a visitor looks on. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth23465/
[Close-up of books on shelf]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24183/
[Close-up of books on table]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24187/
[Close-up of identification cards]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22217/
[Close-up of lettering on side of metal cart]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24122/
[Close-up of letters and brochures on desk of Oscar Solis Flores]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22623/
[Close-up of Oscar Solis Flores' computer screen]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth22622/
[Close-up of paperback books on table]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24176/
[Close-up of rack containing Spanish-language pamphlets]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24189/
[Close-up of side of lemonade container]
More than 100 persons from Dallas contributed to the Mexican state of Colima to be entered in the next Guinness book of world records for having created the world's largest lemonade at 3500 liters. 20,000 lemons, or one ton, from the valleys of Colima along with 3750 liters of water and 56 liters of syrup beat out the previous record holder of 2500 liters that was created in Victoria, Australia in 1996. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24465/
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