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 Decade: 1920-1929
 Collection: O. Henry Project
O. Henryana
This work was published posthumously. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139325/
The Crucible
A poem entitled "The Crucible" by O. Henry turned into a song by Alexander McFayden. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139284/
Letters to Lithopolis
This work is a collection of letters from O. Henry to Mabel Wagnalls. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139445/
The Texas Trail of O. Henry
Newspaper article includes sketches and photos of O. Henry and friends. Describes O.Henry's life and his time in Austin. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth154585/
The Caballero's Way
Short story about a young desperado from the Texas-Mexico border. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139461/
Advertisement for complete O. Henry collection
Advertisment offering 274 O. Henry stories in one volume. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139298/
[Advertisement letter for complete O. Henry collection]
Advertising letter offering 274 O. Henry stories in one volume. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139297/
Advertising postal card for complete O. Henry collection
Advertisement offering 274 O. Henry stories in one volume. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139299/
[Letter from Christopher Morley to John Stahl]
Letter signed by Chirstopher Morley declining an invitation by Mr. Stahl of the Sears Roebuck Agricultural Foundation texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139290/
Patent 87, Volume 40-A
This document was issued to the Houston & Texas Central Railroad Company as the final instrument in the land grant process, assigning ownership to the railroad company for 640 acres in Tom Green County, section 21, block 20, as described in the patent. A patent is the original deed given by the state to the person or organization who receives first title to the land. It is the legal instrument by and through which the state surrenders title to land. O. Henry wrote a fictional account of illegal proceedings concerning a land certificate, Bexar Scrip 2692, in the short story "Bexar Scrip 2692.” This is the patent that ultimately gave land ownership to the railroad via that certificate. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth139470/