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 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2006
[900 Block N. Sycamore]

[900 Block N. Sycamore]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: Photograph of the 900 block of North Sycamore street in Palestine, Texas, taken from the intersection of Kolstad and N. Sycamore streets, facing north. The address for the large white house (on the left side of the picture) is 901 N. Sycamore and the one next to it is 911 S. Sycamore.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[100 Block W. Kolstad]

[100 Block W. Kolstad]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: Photo of the 100 block of W. Kolstad. Houses from the left to right are 119, 117, and 115 W. Kolstad.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[925 N. Link - Edwin W. and Eva Link House]

[925 N. Link - Edwin W. and Eva Link House]

Date: March 1991
Creator: Emrich, Ron
Description: Photograph of the southeast corner of the "Edwin and Eva Link House," located at 925 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]

[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Emrich, Ron
Description: Photograph of the front of the "Hearne House," a 2 1/2-story house located at 503 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a corner tower with a conical roof on the southwest corner and a 2-tiered porch with turned balustrades. This photo was taken from the street, looking up the front walk toward the house; the front yard is open and there are planters near the start and end of the front walk as well as large trees on either side of the house.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[601 E. Hodges - Elmwood]

[601 E. Hodges - Elmwood]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: When originally built, this house was one of three imposing Queen Anne-style residences on the north side of Hodges Street. Although the others have been left unaltered, this dwelling was changed substantially in the early 20th century when the pedimented portico was added to the front. This alteration changed the character of the property by imposing order and balance to an otherwise asymmetrical composition. In this regard, the property is similar to the Henry and Hypatia Link House at 1003 N. Link. This property was the site of the house of Judge James Perry, a lawyer and one of the area’s earliest settlers, who built his log cabin here around 1845. Prominent local businessman Adolphus Benson Hodges (1858-1913) built the extant house, known as “Elmwood”, in 1910-11; it was completed shortly before his death. The building was designed by James F. Brook. Along with his brother, Daniel, Hodges operated a chain of mercantile stores throughout Texas. In addition to their Palestine store, which was located in the still-extant building at the northwest corner of W. Oak and N. Magnolia, they had stores in Marlin, Cuero, Orange and Port Arthur. Hodges’ wife, Mollie Scarbrough Hodges, continued to live in the house ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[209-211 W. Kolstad - Grace Methodist Church]

[209-211 W. Kolstad - Grace Methodist Church]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: This property is one of thirteen historic churches in Palestine. The building occupies a prominent corner lot, making the church a prominent landmark in the residential neighborhood north of the city’s central business district. The church displays Classical Revival features, and the most notable architectural element is the elliptical archway in the brickwork façade. This church, alternately called Grace Methodist Church and Grace Methodist Episcopal Church in early city directories, was built on this site in 1916 by contractor Will Pheifer. There has been a practicing Methodist congregation in Palestine since 1850; the earliest members met in Bascom’s Chapel, an extant building since converted into a private dwelling located at 812 N. Mallard. During the mid-1910’s the congregation split, with some members forming this church and others forming the First United Methodist Church, located on S. Magnolia. Sometime before 2006, it changed hands and is now the One Way Apostolic Faith Holy Temple Headquarters.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1101 N. Cedar - Alamo School]

[1101 N. Cedar - Alamo School]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: Since it’s construction in 1911, the Alamo School has been an important physical and cultural landmark in the residential neighborhood immediately north of Palestine’s central business district. The conversion of the building into the municipal library resulted in the installation of fixed, smoked-glass windows, replacing the original wood-sash double-hung windows. Additions are set back from the original school, thereby minimizing their impact on the property’s historic character. The use of a relatively narrow vertical band of glass between the additions and the old building represents another attempt to preserve the historic character of the old school. The Alamo school was built around 1911, and served its original purpose through the 1980’s. In the late 1980’s it was converted into the new public library.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]

[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Goebel, Matt
Description: One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[921 N. Perry - McReynolds House]

[921 N. Perry - McReynolds House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Emrich, Ron
Description: In its present configuration, the McClure-McReynolds-fowler House has a U-shaped plan; however, it originally was a center-passage dwelling similar to the George & Cornelia Howard House at 1101 N. Perry. Additions during the late 19th century changed the overall appearance and reflect the property’s architectural evolution. The house retains its historic character and integrity and is among the most significant examples of vernacular architecture in the city. Tennessee-native Judge Alexander Ewing McClure (1815-1870) built this house in 1849. After arriving in Texas in 1840 and residing for several years in Fort Houston, Judge McClure moved to Palestine, becoming the first district clerk for Anderson County, co-owner of the “Trinity Advocate” (the region’s first newspaper), and one of the area’s most prominent lawyers. Zachariah Aycock McReynolds (1846-1928), a native of Georgia and a Confederate veteran, purchased the house in 1884. He held several local elected offices during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including district clerk, county clerk, county judge, tax collector, and postmaster. He remodeled this house around 1890, reusing the original timber. In 1934 Colonel Godfrey Rees Fowler (1876-1958) retired to this house with his wife, Ella Sue McReynolds (Z.A. McReynold’s daughter). A grandson of John H. Reagan, ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1011 N. Perry - Howard House]

[1011 N. Perry - Howard House]

Date: February 1993
Creator: Emrich, Ron
Description: The Howard House was the former home of Colonel George Howard and his wife, Cornelia Cox Howard. Built in 1851 the house is located on land deeded August 17, 1850 to Colonel Howard from Judge Reuben Reeves and his wife, Sarah. Colonel Howard and Mrs. Howard came to Palestine from Tennessee in 1849. Given the title of Colonel when he organized a company of men during the Civil War, he later served in the Texas Legislature, held several county offices and was Mayor of Palestine from 1886-1887. Colonel Howard was an active merchant in Palestine and in 1855 his store was located on the east side of the courthouse square. The Howard House of Greek revival influence is one of the best preserved examples of the ante bellum homes in the city. A walk of handmade brick leads to the house with its pillared portico and a center hall runs through the house with rooms on either side. There are a number of furnishings and other interesting items which are original to the house including a beautifully carved piano. The home remained in the possession of descendants of the Howard family until it was purchased by the City of Palestine ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
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