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 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2007
2 Men, Old Car, and Steam Thresher
Photograph of old model car with a man standing by it and a steam thresher that has smoke coming from it with a man standing on it. Subjects are in a cut field of wheat. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36046/
The 3 A.J. Stuarts
Photograph of the Stuarts family. Three men are shown seated together holding cigars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth37825/
[4-H Club Members]
Photograph of three members of the 4-H Club. The women are sitting and kneeling beside a lake in Fair Park for a picnic. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34453/
[E-4 Streamliners in Chicago]
The Chicago and North Western Railway's E-4 type streamliners, which headed the "Overland Limited" and "Challenger" trains between Chicago and the West Coast, stand in the Chicago Passenger Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28890/
[13 men in front of truck]
Photograph of 13 men beside a truck. Two men are sitting with legs crossed while a man has his hand placed on the top of the automobile. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth37313/
27 Anniversary celebration at The Shamrock
Photograph of a group of a people celebrating a 27th Anniversary at The Shamrock Hotel in 1949. Siting right to left: Malcom and Louise Pearce, Daisy Sells, Edith Pearce, Jess Trimble texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth36796/
[100 W. Oak]
Photograph of the front and side of the Kolstad Jewelry store, located at 100 W. Oak in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Oak and Sycamore streets. It is a two-story brick building with decorative architectural elements around the upper-story windows and roofline. On the first floor, the walls around the store are tiled and there is a striped awning over the sidewalk with the text "Texas' Oldest Store" above the entrance. Signs above the awning say "Thomas C. Smith, Proprietor," "Kolstad," and "George Handson: Jeweler, Calligrapher, Clock Repair" on the front of the store and "Kolstad [...] Texas' Oldest Store" on the side. A part of an adjacent building is visible on the far right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26386/
[116 N. Sycamore - Colley Wright Building]
Photo of the Colley Wright building, that once sat at the east side of the intersection of Spring street at Sycamore. This building was removed when Spring Street was widened and extended down to Crockett Road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26266/
[201 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front and east side of a two-story house located at 201 E. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a tower with a conical roof on the southeast corner and wood details along the front porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26615/
[210 Crawford - J.H. Silliman Home]
Photo of the J.H. Silliman Home, located at 210 Crawford. A Mississippi native, J.H. Silliman was the proprietor of Silliman and Company – a Palestine business founded in 1871, and one of the largest hardware stores in the region. Silliman married Laura Brook, the architect’James Frith Brook's, daughter, in 1920. The family later moved to 638 S. Magnolia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26589/
[212 S. Magnolia]
Photograph of the front and south side of a white, two-story frame house located at 212 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It has some Queen Anne-style architecture including a 2-story porch and ornate jigsawn trim. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25919/
[216 S. Magnolia]
Close-up photograph of a white, two-story house located at 216 S. Magnolia, Palestine, Texas. There is some decorative woodwork along the eaves and corners of the house, and there is a green awning over the front porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25918/
[220 W. Reagan - Grant House]
Photograph of the west side of the "Grant House," a two-story, Queen Anne-style house located at 220 W. Reagan (on the corner of W. Reagan and S. May streets) in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26428/
[220 W. Reagan - Grant House]
Photograph of the front and west side of the "Grant House," a yellow, two-story, Queen Anne-style house located at 220 W. Reagan (on the corner of W. Reagan and S. May streets) in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25921/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the front of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26391/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the front of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, including a gazebo near the back of the house and a fountain in the front of the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26390/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the front of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story white house with blue trim that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, including a gazebo near the back of the house and a fountain in the front of the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26389/
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the north and east sides of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story house that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, a fountain in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25779/
[303 E Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26238/
[303 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, frame house with some Classical Revival-style architectural elements, located at 303 E. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. There is a sign in the front yard that says "Dogwood Trails Open House"; a woman and young girl are walking toward the entrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26236/
[303 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front and west side of a two-story, frame house with some Classical Revival-style architectural elements, located at 303 E. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas, taken from N. Cedar Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26618/
[303 E Kolstad]
Photograph of the front and east side of a white, two-story, frame house located at 303 E. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. It has some Classical Revival-style architectural elements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26237/
[303 E. Kolstad]
Photograph of the front of a blue, two-story, frame house located at 303 E. Kolstad in Palestine, Texas. It has some Classical Revival-style architectural elements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25882/
[303 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front and south side of a two-story, brick and stucco Tudor Revival-style house located at 303 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. Distinctive architectural features include the decorative half-timbered woodwork on the exterior, the steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof, the windows with small panes, and the incorporation of stone into the masonry exterior walls. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26249/
[304 Main Street]
Photograph of the entrance to a multi-story commercial building located at 304 Main Street in Palestine, Texas. It has three large, arched openings for doors and windows with decorative metalwork over them, depicting trees. Part of the adjacent building is visible on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29207/
[315 E. Kolstad]
During the late 19th and very early 20th centuries, the Queen Anne style enjoyed considerable popularity locally, especially among more affluent citizens. This large, 2-story frame residence is one such example, although the application of asbestos siding over the wood siding detracts from the property’s overall historic character. Other than the new siding, the house appears to have changed little since its construction in 1903. Judge Thomas Benton Greenwood (1832-1900) and his wife Lucy Henry Gee built a one-story house on this site in the 1870s, which later was enlarged into the present 2-story building around the turn of the century. A native of Mississippi and a Confederate veteran, Mr. Greenwood was a prominent Palestine lawyer during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. In 1872 he formed a law partnership with John Young Gooch (later a state senator); subsequently, the two men formed a law firm with John H. Reagan, the former Postmaster General of the Confederacy and U.S. congressman. Dr. Bethune F. McDonald, a physician and surgeon with offices at 103 ½ W. Oak, purchased this house in 1935. He and his wife Josephine continued to live here through the early 1940s, when Mr. McDonald died. Mrs. McDonald lived in the house until 1960, when the building was purchased by Richard and June Handorf. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26235/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26447/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26446/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26350/
[404 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, white house located at 404 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25915/
[404 S. Royall]
Close-up photograph of the front of a two-story, white house located at 404 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26248/
[405 E. Neches]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, Colonial Revival-style house located at 405 E. Neches in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25900/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26595/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
Photograph of a light-colored house surrounded by a lawn and trees. One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26529/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26532/
[408 E. Neches]
Close-up photograph of part of the front of a two-story, Tudor Revival-style brick house located at 408 E. Neches in Palestine, Texas. Perhaps the most noteworthy architectural element is the decorative half-timbered construction on parts of the exterior. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26253/
[408 E. Neches]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, Tudor Revival-style brick house located at 408 E. Neches in Palestine, Texas. Perhaps the most noteworthy architectural element is the decorative half-timbered construction on parts of the exterior. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25901/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Photograph of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A sign outside the front entrance has information about worship services. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25684/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Copy negative of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A smaller building is visible to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26575/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Photograph of the northeast corner of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the corner of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26369/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church - Palestine]
Photograph of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A sign outside the front entrance has information about worship services. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25805/
[410 Avenue A - Palestine Daily Herald Building]
Copy negative of the Palestine Herald building on the 300 Block of Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a one-story, red-brick building with white masonry accents; the word "Herald" is in white stone in the center, near the top. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26444/
[411 S. Sycamore - A.S. Fox Home]
Photograph of a family on the lawn of the A.S. Fox home, located at 411 S. Sycamore in Palestine, Texas. There are two young girls wearing light-colored dresses, standing on the left side of the image and looking at a spouting fountain in the yard; a man is standing on the right side of the image, holding a toddler. The house is visible in the background. It is a two-story, light-colored building with two chimneys and a widow's walk on the room, as well as a wrap-around front porch with woodwork. A woman is standing on the porch looking toward the camera. A smaller, more ornate building is also visible on the far left of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29192/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Copy negative of the front of a two-story house located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. There are people on the porch and in the front yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26458/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the front and south side of a two-story house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and brick around the lower level of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25773/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the south side of a two-story white house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and red brick around the lower level of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26246/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the southwest corner of a two-story white house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and red brick around the lower level of the house. There is snow on the roof and in the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26247/
[418 N. Tennessee - St. Mary's Academy]
Photograph of the front entrance of St. Mary's Academy, located on the 500 Block of N. Tennessee Avenue in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with Gothic Revival-style features. There is a partially-visible stone tower above the entrance, as well as a stone arch over the door. Part of another wing is visible on the left side of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25644/
[419 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, white, Queen Anne-style frame house located at 419 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. The most noteworthy features are the tower, which is set at an angle on the southeast corner, and the 2-tiered front porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26245/
[422 S. Magnolia - First United Methodist Church - Palestine]
Copy negative of the front and south side of the First United Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas, taken from the corner of Magnolia and Reagan streets. The two-story church is made of brick with stone accents and has Gothic Revival-style architecture, including pointed, arched openings and corner towers; the tower on the southwest corner is taller than the rest of the building. Many of the windows are open. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26659/
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