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 Decade: 1990-1999
 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2007
[A Parade in Palestine]

[A Parade in Palestine]

Date: c. 1990
Creator: unknown
Description: A parade in Palestine. Sheriff Roy Herrington is on the horse on the left.
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Collage of Old Houses]

[Collage of Old Houses]

Date: c. 1990
Creator: unknown
Description: Collage of photos of old houses of Palestine.
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1991~
Creator: unknown
Description: The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[715 S. Magnolia]

[715 S. Magnolia]

Date: February 1992
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of 715 S. Magnolia taken from the road. One of the most popular building types in Palestine is the modified L-plan house. This dwelling is a good example. With its distinctive hipped roof and gabled extensions, the house displays some Queen Anne and Classical Revival architectural embellishments. The use of shingles in the gable ends and the dormer are indicative of the Queen Anne style, while the small Doric-like columns and simple balustrade on the porch reflect an influence of the Classical Revival style. In good condition and with few alterations, the house retains its integrity to a high degree. Prominent local architect John S. Moad designed this house in 1902 for James A. and Mathilda Caldwell. Mr. Caldwell was the chief dispatcher for the I&GN Railroad. Later owners included E.M. Burrell, owner of Murrell’s Variety Store (located at 115 W. Main), and his wife Odis, who lived here during the mid-1920s. From as early as 1935 through at least 1941, the house was owned and occupied by Walter S. and Ellen Miller.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[I&GN Railroad Hospital - 919 S. Magnolia]

[I&GN Railroad Hospital - 919 S. Magnolia]

Date: February 1992
Creator: unknown
Description: The I&GN Hospital, one of the most noteworthy landmarks in all of Palestine, has been a prominent fixture in the predominantly residential neighborhood south of the downtown area since its construction in 1921. The 3-story, metal-framed, brick-faced hospital, along with associated outbuilding (the Nurses Home), occupies an entire block. The building has a box-like massing with some Classical Revival detailing, especially around the primary entrance. The wide, cast stone bands divide the exterior into three components and emphasize the horizontal massing of the building. The hospital and nurses home retain their integrity to a remarkable degree. The International & Great Northern Railroad operated a hospital for its employees on this site beginning in 1884. Prominent Houston architect Alfred E. Finn designed the present building for the railroad, which formally opened in July 1922. Local architect Theodore S. Maffitt designed the adjacent nurses’ quarters in 1924. The main building served as medical offices for physicians in private practice for years, with the Nurses building serving as the headquarters of the Palestine chapter of the Red Cross, but both buildings have been mostly vacant for several years now.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1003 S. Magnolia]

[1003 S. Magnolia]

Date: February 1992
Creator: Oliver McReynolds
Description: This residential neighborhood south of Palestine’s central business district contains many majestic 2-story residences of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This dwelling is an intact and relatively unaltered example. The dominant architectural feature is the front porch with its classically inspired detailing. The low-pitched roof and extended eaves, however, are more indicative of the Prairie School, an architectural movement that was marginally popular in Palestine during the early 20th century. Contractor J.S. Hale built this house in 1904-05 for $2,500. The original owners and occupants were Thomas M. and Laura Sterne Haynes. Mr. Haynes was a local druggist. Later owners included Mrs. J.L. Crain in the mid-1920s; Robert H. Wright, a conductor for Missouri Pacific, and his wife Mattie, in the mid-1930s; and Robert L. Moore, a switchman for Missouri Pacific, and his wife Margaret, in the early 1940s.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1991~
Creator: unknown
Description: The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[1305 S. Sycamore - Broyles House]

[1305 S. Sycamore - Broyles House]

Date: February 1992
Creator: Oliver McReynolds
Description: This house is one of the most opulent and outstanding examples of the Queen Anne style in Palestine. This majestic 2 ½ story frame residence displays superb craftsmanship throughout the elaborate woodwork of the exterior. Although the porch has been screen in, the building retains much of its historic character and integrity. Prominent local architect Luther McKlemurry designed and built this house for William McBurney Broyles and his wife Caroline Scott Broyles in 1893-94. An Alabama native, Mr. Broyles (1849-1925) was a prosperous East Texas lumberman, who played an important role in the economic development of Palestine during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was active in local real estate, and developed three new additions to the town, including the Broyles Addition, on which this house is situated. Much of the exemplary millwork featured on the house was manufactured in Broyles’ own Palestine mills. The house was later occupied by son Gordon Broyles, who lived here until his death in 1987. The house is still in the Broyles family.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[1209 S. Sycamore]

[1209 S. Sycamore]

Date: February 1992
Creator: Oliver McReynolds
Description: Though many Queen Anne-style dwellings survive in Palestine, few retain their integrity to such a high degree as this 2 ½ story residence on S. Sycamore. Most of the noteworthy detailing is on the porch and in the gable ends. A local historian notes that this house was built for prominent local attorney Judge N.B. Morris in 1902. City directories note that later owners included David and Mattie Holley, who lived here from as early as 1926 until at least 1941. At that time, Mr. Holley was assistant manager of the Silliman Hardware Company.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[Trinity Presbyterian Church - 1220 S. Sycamore]

[Trinity Presbyterian Church - 1220 S. Sycamore]

Date: February 1992
Creator: Oliver McReynolds
Description: Trinity Presbytiran Church located at 1220 S. Sycamore Street.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
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