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 Resource Type: Photograph
 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2007
[Letter to Henry DeBarger, March 29th, 1841]

[Letter to Henry DeBarger, March 29th, 1841]

Date: March 29, 1841
Creator: unknown
Description: Letter to Henry DeBarger of York, Pa. from someone in the paper mill business in Philadelphia. Signature of person sending the letter is indecipherable.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Caroline R. Scrivner Richards
Republic of Texas Land Grant Certificate

Republic of Texas Land Grant Certificate

Date: March 28, 1844
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a land grant from the Republic of Texas. It is to James Cole of Robertson County and is signed by Sam Houston.
Contributing Partner: Dallas Heritage Village
Eugene, Arthur and Mrs. Thomas Bancroft

Eugene, Arthur and Mrs. Thomas Bancroft

Date: 1858
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of Mrs. Thomas Bancroft and her two sons, Eugene William Bancroft on her right and Arthur J. Bancroft on her left. Mrs. Bancroft is wearing a dark dress, white gloves, lace collar and a bonnet with a large bow tied underneath her chin. She has her arm around Eugene who is wearing a dark dress with white collar. Arthur is wearing a dark outfit with white collar.
Contributing Partner: Heritage House Museum
[Bancroft Family]

[Bancroft Family]

Date: 1861~
Creator: unknown
Description: Oval photo of Mrs. Thomas Bancroft with her sons, Eugene and Arthur. She wears a bonnet with lace around the opening. She is seated between her sons.
Contributing Partner: Heritage House Museum
[Freedmens First Vote - Anderson County Courthouse]

[Freedmens First Vote - Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1869
Creator: unknown
Description: This photo shows the military presence protecting African American's when they came to the Anderson County courthouse to vote for the first time in 1869.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
New Map of the State of Texas 1874

New Map of the State of Texas 1874

Date: 1874
Creator: G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co.
Description: This is a map of the state of Texas from 1874. It was prepared for Morphis' History of Texas.
Contributing Partner: Dallas Heritage Village
[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

Date: 1875~
Creator: unknown
Description: Illinois-native George Mansfield Dilley, the prominent railroad-building contractor who played an instrumental role in the expansion of railroads throughout Texas and the South, established this foundry in 1873, one year after the railroad arrived in Palestine. The George M. Dilley & Son Foundry, located adjacent to the I&GN tracks, at one time contained more than ten buildings. The enterprise manufactured some farm equipment and machinery, but its primary output was gray iron and brass castings for Texas railroads. The elder Dilley moved to Dallas in the 1880s, but the foundry continued to be run by his son, George Edward Dilley – one of Palestine’s most prominent citizens of the late 19th century. G.E. Dilley continued operations at the foundry until his death in 1932; his son Clarence V. Dilley then took over until his own death five years later. In the mid-1930s, the plant had an average payroll of about twenty thousand dollars, for a workforce of twenty to twenty-five men. The foundry ceased operations in the late 1930s. All that remains today are the frame office building, the nearby brick brass furnace building, and a lengthy iron fence which borders the property and faces May Street (which local historians ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

Date: 1875~
Creator: unknown
Description: Illinois-native George Mansfield Dilley, the prominent railroad-building contractor who played an instrumental role in the expansion of railroads throughout Texas and the South, established this foundry in 1873, one year after the railroad arrived in Palestine. The George M. Dilley & Son Foundry, located adjacent to the I&GN tracks, at one time contained more than ten buildings. The enterprise manufactured some farm equipment and machinery, but its primary output was gray iron and brass castings for Texas railroads. The elder Dilley moved to Dallas in the 1880s, but the foundry continued to be run by his son, George Edward Dilley – one of Palestine’s most prominent citizens of the late 19th century. G.E. Dilley continued operations at the foundry until his death in 1932; his son Clarence V. Dilley then took over until his own death five years later. In the mid-1930s, the plant had an average payroll of about twenty thousand dollars, for a workforce of twenty to twenty-five men. The foundry ceased operations in the late 1930s. All that remains today are the frame office building, the nearby brick brass furnace building, and a lengthy iron fence which borders the property and faces May Street (which local historians ...
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
[Man posing with horse in front of a wrought iron fence]

[Man posing with horse in front of a wrought iron fence]

Date: 1876
Creator: Centennial Photographic Co.
Description: Man posing with horse in front of a wrought iron fence.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Caroline R. Scrivner Richards
[Spring Street - Palestine]

[Spring Street - Palestine]

Date: 1879~
Creator: unknown
Description: Photo of Spring Street in Palestine with a view of the railroad tracks and a wooden depot.
Contributing Partner: Palestine Public Library
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