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 Resource Type: Photograph
 County: Los Angeles County, CA
 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2007
["Sunset Limited" at Los Angeles Terminal Station]
Southern Pacific's "Sunset Limited" train No. 1, westbound, headed by diesel locomotive 6042, crossing the Los Angeles River near the Los Angeles Terminal Station on March 19, 1954. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28777/
[La Grande Station in Los Angeles]
The old Santa Fe passenger depot, La Grande Station, in Los Angeles, California around 1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28740/
["The California Limited"]
Santa Fe's oldest name train - the California Limited stand in the Los Angeles California depot. This de Luxe passenger train headed by a beautiful ten wheeler, type 4-6-0 engine No. 53, with a consist of six superb passenger cars, all handcrafted wood - having open platforms and under body truss rods - has consummated its long journey - approximately 2,267 miles - requiring about 68 hours - from Chicago. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28926/
[Early "California Limited" entering Los Angeles]
One of the early "California Limiteds" entering the suburbs of Los Angeles, possibly dating from the late 1870's. The ten-wheeler, type 4-6-0, heading the train bears an original Santa Fe engine No. 54, indicative of ancient age. At the turn of the century the Santa Fe owned a large fleet of these locomotives: 478 ten-wheelers; these were versatile engines, known as "Jack of all Trades." However, no steam locomotives of this type were built to Santa Fe blueprints later than 1901. Observe the consist: the old weather-worn wooden railway post office car in the lead and the other open-platform wooden cars - all heated by potbellied iron stoves which burned wood or coal, and illuminated by kerosene. In this era, travel by rail had potential hazards but its popularity never waned. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth28924/
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