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 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2007
[303 E. Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26236/
[303 E Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26238/
[303 E Kolstad]
The neighborhood north of Palestine’s central business district contains mostly houses erected during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This 2-story frame residence is a good and well-preserved example of such a dwelling, though it is more substantial in scale than most houses in the neighborhood. The exterior presents a balanced and orderly appearance that reflects the Classical Revival style. The house retains much of its historic character and integrity. Though this house probably dates to c.1900, city directory research was only able to trace its occupancy to 1926, when it was owned and occupied by Philip F. Crutchfield and his wife Minnie E. Before his death in the late 1930s, Mr. Crutchfield worked as a conductor for the I&GN Railroad, and later for Missouri Pacific. Mrs. Crutchfield continued to live in the house into the 1940s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26237/
[303 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front and south side of a two-story, brick and stucco Tudor Revival-style house located at 303 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. Distinctive architectural features include the decorative half-timbered woodwork on the exterior, the steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof, the windows with small panes, and the incorporation of stone into the masonry exterior walls. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26249/
[304 Main Street]
Entrance to 304 Main Street - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29207/
[315 E. Kolstad]
During the late 19th and very early 20th centuries, the Queen Anne style enjoyed considerable popularity locally, especially among more affluent citizens. This large, 2-story frame residence is one such example, although the application of asbestos siding over the wood siding detracts from the property’s overall historic character. Other than the new siding, the house appears to have changed little since its construction in 1903. Judge Thomas Benton Greenwood (1832-1900) and his wife Lucy Henry Gee built a one-story house on this site in the 1870s, which later was enlarged into the present 2-story building around the turn of the century. A native of Mississippi and a Confederate veteran, Mr. Greenwood was a prominent Palestine lawyer during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. In 1872 he formed a law partnership with John Young Gooch (later a state senator); subsequently, the two men formed a law firm with John H. Reagan, the former Postmaster General of the Confederacy and U.S. congressman. Dr. Bethune F. McDonald, a physician and surgeon with offices at 103 ½ W. Oak, purchased this house in 1935. He and his wife Josephine continued to live here through the early 1940s, when Mr. McDonald died. Mrs. McDonald lived in the house until 1960, when the building was purchased by Richard and June Handorf. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26235/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26447/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26350/
[400 N. Queen - Redlands Hotel]
Photograph of the south and west sides of the Redlands Hotel, on the corner of Oak and Queen streets, at 400 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. It is a Two-Part Vertical Block building that has a U-shaped plan and load-bearing masonry walls, with Renaissance Revival-style architectural elements. Noteworthy features include the quoin-like brick in the end bays of the west and south elevations, and the entablature with large brackets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26446/
[404 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, white house located at 404 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25915/
[404 S. Royall]
Close-up photograph of the front of a two-story, white house located at 404 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26248/
[405 E. Neches]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, Colonial Revival-style house located at 405 E. Neches in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25900/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26595/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
Photograph of a light-colored house surrounded by a lawn and trees. One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26529/
[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]
One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the War between the States, he was appointed by Governor Sam Houston to be Chief Justice of Anderson County and served until 1865. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, helped establish the first public school in Palestine and served on the first school board. Judge William Alexander died in January 1872 and is buried in the Old Palestine Cemetery near his former law partner, Judge John Mallard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26532/
[408 E. Neches]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, Tudor Revival-style brick house located at 408 E. Neches in Palestine, Texas. Perhaps the most noteworthy architectural element is the decorative half-timbered construction on parts of the exterior. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25901/
[408 E. Neches]
Close-up photograph of part of the front of a two-story, Tudor Revival-style brick house located at 408 E. Neches in Palestine, Texas. Perhaps the most noteworthy architectural element is the decorative half-timbered construction on parts of the exterior. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26253/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Photograph of the northeast corner of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the corner of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26369/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Photograph of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A sign outside the front entrance has information about worship services. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25684/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Copy negative of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A smaller building is visible to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26575/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church - Palestine]
Photograph of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A sign outside the front entrance has information about worship services. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25805/
[410 Avenue A - Palestine Daily Herald Building]
Copy negative of the Palestine Herald building on the 300 Block of Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a one-story, red-brick building with white masonry accents; the word "Herald" is in white stone in the center, near the top. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26444/
[411 S. Sycamore - A.S. Fox Home]
Photo of the A.S. Fox home, located at 411 S. Sycamore. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29192/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the southwest corner of a two-story white house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and red brick around the lower level of the house. There is snow on the roof and in the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26247/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the south side of a two-story white house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and red brick around the lower level of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26246/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Copy negative of the front of a two-story house located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. There are people on the porch and in the front yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26458/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the front and south side of a two-story house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and brick around the lower level of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25773/
[418 N. Tennessee - St. Mary's Academy]
Photograph of the front entrance of St. Mary's Academy, located on the 500 Block of N. Tennessee Avenue in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with Gothic Revival-style features. There is a partially-visible stone tower above the entrance, as well as a stone arch over the door. Part of another wing is visible on the left side of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25644/
[419 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a two-story, white, Queen Anne-style frame house located at 419 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. The most noteworthy features are the tower, which is set at an angle on the southeast corner, and the 2-tiered front porch. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26245/
[422 S. Magnolia - First United Methodist Church - Palestine]
The Centenary Methodist Church is one of 13 historic religious buildings identified in the survey. With its pointed, arched openings and corner towers, this institutional building is one of the city’s best examples of the Gothic Revival style, especially as interpreted on ecclesiastical buildings. The construction of massive additions on the north side have somewhat compromised the historic character but the building retains sufficient integrity to be recognizable to its period of significance. There has been an active Methodist presence in Palestine since about 1850. At that time the only local congregation met in Bascom’s Chapel, an extant building located at 812 N. Mallard, which has since been converted into a private residence. During the early 20th century the original congregation split, with some members establishing this church, the Centenary Methodist Church, and some founding Grace United Methodist Church, located just north of downtown. Locally prominent contractor John H. Gaught constructed the sanctuary of this church in 1910-11. It was renamed the First Methodist Episcopal church by the mid-1920s, and today is known as the First United Methodist church. This photo was taken when the windows could be swiveled open to catch air during the warm months of the year. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26659/
[501 S. Magnolia]
Charles Jacobs, a native of Prussia, and his wife Rachel Lucas Jacobs built a small one-story house on this site around 1877, according to local historians. Mr. Jacobs was the proprietor of a local men’s clothing store. Jack T. Harris, the subsequent owner, added a second story around the turn of the century. Later owners of the house included Steven E. Reed, who served as mayor of Palestine from 1931-34 and for whom Palestine’s first airport was named. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25834/
[501 S. Magnolia]
Charles Jacobs, a native of Prussia, and his wife Rachel Lucas Jacobs built a small one-story house on this site around 1877, according to local historians. Mr. Jacobs was the proprietor of a local men’s clothing store. Jack T. Harris, the subsequent owner, added a second story around the turn of the century. Later owners of the house included Steven E. Reed, who served as mayor of Palestine from 1931-34 and for whom Palestine’s first airport was named. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25798/
[502 N. Queen - Carnegie Building]
Photograph of the northwest corner and front (north side) of the "Carnegie Building," located at 502 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26217/
[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]
Close-up photograph of the front of the "Hearne House," a 2 1/2-story house painted red with white trim, located at 503 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a corner tower with a conical roof on the southwest corner and a 2-tiered porch with turned balustrades. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26242/
[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]
Close-up photograph of the "Hearne House," showing the front viewed from the west side of the yard. It is a 2 1/2-story house painted red with white trim, located at 503 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a corner tower with a conical roof on the southwest corner and a 2-tiered porch with turned balustrades. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26241/
[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]
Photograph of the front of the "Hearne House," a 2 1/2-story house painted red with white trim, located at 503 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a corner tower with a conical roof on the southwest corner and a 2-tiered porch with turned balustrades. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26243/
[503 E. Hodges - Hearne House]
Photograph of the "Hearne House," a 2 1/2-story house located at 503 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It has Queen Anne-style architecture including a corner tower with a conical roof on the southwest corner and a 2-tiered porch with turned balustrades. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26609/
[505 S. Sycamore]
Photo of the house at 505 S. Sycamore taken from the road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26220/
[505 S. Sycamore]
Photo of the house at 505 S. Sycamore taken from the road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26221/
[511 S. Royall]
This modest, center-passage dwelling presents another good illustration of how many late 19th century homeowners applied stylistic ornamentation to a vernacular house form. This 1-story frame residence has a front-facing gable extension and porch with turned-wood columns and jigsawn brackets, all of which are suggestive of the Queen Anne style. Rear additions are not only relatively unobtrusive to the building’s original appearance, but they also reflect the property’s physical evolution and are important architectural features. John H. Reagan built this house in the 1880s for his daughter, Bettie Reagan Ferguson, and his son-in-law, Alexander Ferguson. Mr. Ferguson was postmaster of Palestine from 1886-1890. The dwelling was later the home of the couple’s daughter, Bess Ferguson, who taught in the Palestine schools and was a librarian at the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26244/
[512 N. John - Eilenberger's Bakery]
The remodeling for the storefront on this 2-story brick building detracts from the property’s historic character, but the second floor is relatively unaltered. The structure lacks much stylistic ornamentation, but is a good and mostly intact example of a Two-part Commercial Block building in Palestine’s historic downtown. German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) moved his highly successful American Home Bakery to this site in 1918. Founded in 1898, the bakery was originally located at the corner of John and Oak Streets. Eilenberger sold the business to his two sons and his son-in-law in 1949; the bakery continued to sell baked bread throughout East Texas until 1968. Today the business is known as Eilenberger’s Bakery, and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25897/
[517 E. Hodges - Hodges-Darsey House]
Photograph of the front and east side of the "Hodges-Darsey House," located at 517 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white, Queen Anne-style house with Ionic columns along the front porch, which wraps slightly to either side, and a round tower near the southeast corner of the building, in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25808/
[517 E. Hodges - Hodges-Darsey House]
Photograph of the front and part of the east side of the "Hodges-Darsey House," located at 517 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white, Queen Anne-style house with Ionic columns along the front porch, which wraps slightly to either side, and a round tower near the southeast corner of the building, in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25812/
[517 E. Hodges - Hodges-Darsey House]
Photograph of the front and east side of the "Hodges-Darsey House," located at 517 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white, Queen Anne-style house with Ionic columns along the front porch, which wraps slightly to either side, and a round tower near the southeast corner of the building, in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25809/
[517 E. Hodges - Hodges-Darsey House]
Photograph of the southeast corner of the "Hodges-Darsey House," located at 517 E. Hodges in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white, Queen Anne-style house with Ionic columns along the front porch, which wraps slightly to either side, and a round tower near the southeast corner of the building, in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25818/
[519 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. There is snow on the ground and rooftops. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25780/
[519 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26604/
[519 S. Royall - Gardner, Gooch, Kolstad House]
Close-up photograph of part of the front of the "Gardner, Gooch, Kolstad House," a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. There is snow on the roof and the plants in the yard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26222/
[519 S. Royall - Gardner, Gooch, Kolstad House]
Close-up photograph of part of the northeast corner of the "Gardner, Gooch, Kolstad House," from the front. It is a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26223/
[519 S. Royall - Gooch, Gardner, Kolstad House]
Close-up photograph of the front of the "Gooch, Gardner, Kolstad House," a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26224/