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 County: Tarrant County, TX
 Collection: Rescuing Texas History, 2010
[1930 Ahavath Sholom Dues Statement]
Bill for $125 in annual dues for the Ahavath Sholom Congregation, in Fort Worth, Texas. The dues statement is for congregation member, B. Max Mehl. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117169/
Family Night at La Grave Field
Flyer promoting "Family Night at La Grave Field" with the Fort Worth Cats, a minor league baseball team from Fort Worth, Texas. The flyer is promoting a game between the Cats and a team in Houston, Texas. There is an illustration of a baseball player holding a bat. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117194/
[Memorial Service Flyer]
Flyer announcing a community memorial service to be held at the Ahavath Sholom Synagogue in Fort Worth, Texas. The memorial service was in memory of local soldiers "fallen in battle," and was officiated by Rabbi Samuel Soskin and Rabbi Charles Blumenthal. The soldiers remembered were: Richard Burt, Harold Gilbert, Alvin Rubin and Walter C. Sanders. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117207/
[Stained Glass Windows, Beth-El Congregation, Briarhaven Rd. Synagogue]
Partial presentation containing labeled slides that showcase the stained-glass windows on the interior of the Beth-El synagogue in Fort Worth, Texas. The images include the stained-glass windows and views of the chapel and sanctuary; in order, the slide images are: [2] the Chapel (interior), [3] close-up of the three stained-glass windows in the Chapel, [4] Hall of Remembrance, [5] main sanctuary (interior), [6] close-up of sanctuary front (interior) and stained glass, [7] close-up of the stained-glass window depicting a shofar, [8] close-up of the stained-glass window depicting a burning bush, and [9] close-up of the stained-glass window depicting the tree of life. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188552/
[Letter to a Gold Star Mother]
Typed letter from Amon Carter and his son, Amon Carter Jr. to "a Gold Star Mother." Gold Star Mothers is a support organization formed for mothers who lost a son or daughter in World War II. The letter expresses condolences and comfort to Rose Gilbert and was accompanied by a gift basket of grapefruits, as noted in the letter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117206/
[Jewish Pre-School Students]
Photograph of pre-school students at the Dan Danciger Jewish Community Center in Fort Worth, Texas. The students are arranged in five rows with students in the back two rows standing and the others are seated; the teachers are standing other either side of the students. From left to right, the teachers in the photograph are: Lil Goldman, Ceil Echt, Eunice Coy and Miriam Schultz. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117190/
[Mobberly and Dobbs]
Photographic postcard of H. Mobberly and W. C. Dobbs standing in front of a painted railroad car backdrop. Mr. Mobberly is standing on the left, and Mr. Dobbs is standing on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth403373/
[Letter from Harry Goldstein]
Typed letter to the family of Private Harold Gilbert from a fellow soldier named Harry Goldstein, sent from Marseilles. The letter describes the sinking of a troop transport ship, Dec. 25, 1944, in which in which Gilbert was killed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117205/
[Hebrew Institute Building Fund Committee]
Letterhead stationary for the Hebrew Institute Building Fund Committee outlining all the donors for the institute and their monetary contributions. The building, designed by the architectural firm of Field and Clarkson, was constructed between April and August of 1914 in the 800 block of Taylor Street in Fort Worth, Texas at a cost of $14,668. The top left corner of the document shows an architectural drawing of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117173/
[Beth-El Congregation's Second Synagogue]
Photograph of the second synagogue of Beth-El Congregation, Fort Worth's Reform Jewish house of worship. The photo appears to have been taken in 1948 after the temple was refurbished due to a 1946 fire that gutted the interior. The red-brick building, at 207 W. Broadway Ave., has two-stories plus a basement with a social hall and kitchen. The building's facade has a frieze above the entry with a quote from Psalms ("Give Ear, O Lord, Unto My Prayer") as well as two menorahs above the frieze. There are also stained-glass windows around the entrance and along the length of the building. A handwritten note on the back of the photo says, "Exterior 2nd Temple. 207 W. Broadway." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188533/
[Ahavath Sholom Sunday School Students]
Photograph of the Ahavath Sholom Congregation Sunday School students. They are standing on the front steps outside the synagogue in the 800 block of Taylor Street in Fort Worth, Texas. From left to right, top to bottom, the students in the photograph are: Row 1: Betty Carshon, Rachel Kruger, Dora Laves, Lena Rovinsky, Udys Weinstein, Lily Dworkin, Joe Ray Schwartzberg. Row 2: Charlie Anton, Milton Mehl, Arthur Rosenbaum, Charlotte Ray, Lily Levine, Molly Finger, Freda Hurwitz, Rae Carshon, Mary Bliss, Sylvia Shosid. Row 3: Alex Victor, William Hurwitz, Irving Kershman, Julius Scolnic, Mary Resnick, Sophia Blum, Mary Herman, Ida Berg, Beatrice Frankrich, Reva Nebrat, Gertrude Ellis, Raymond Dan. Row 4: Sidney Deutch, David Tuck, Rubin Anton, Norma Resnick, Lily Alpert, Rose Chicotsky, Hannah Chicotsky, Anna Gordon, Martha Daiches. Row 5: Nathan Frankel, Abe Goldstein, Abe Shosid, Paul Herman, Johanna Winer, Sadie Rovinsky, Sarah Garston, Irving Rosenthal. Row 6: Sidney Marks, Minnie Snofsky, Esther Klimist, Rebecca Lutsky, David Bernstein, Max Perlman, Sarah Kruger, Rosalie Bliss. Row 7: Morris Schwartz, Grace Dworkin, Lola Bozokofsky, Hyman Jacobson, Cecil Bozokofsky, Helen Kassover, Sonia Gulila, Sam Weisblatt, Florence Kassover, Patricia Jacobson. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117177/
[Floating Star, Interior of Beth-El Congregation Sanctuary]
Photograph of the floating star which was suspended from the ceiling as part of the interior design of the sanctuary when Beth-El was rebuilt in 1948 after the 1946 fire. The interior designer was the Hungarian-American architect Erno Fabry. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188536/
[Ark and Bimah, main sanctuary at Beth-El Congregation]
Photograph, taken in 2000, of the "bimah" or altar in the main sanctuary at Beth-El Congregation, 207 W. Broadway, Fort Worth. The building was constructed in 1920, rebuilt in 1948 after a fire gutted the interior, and remodeled in 1981. The 1948 rebuilding and redesign were by the Hungarian-American interior designer Erno Fabry. His design ideas include the stone wall behind the altar, built with reddish Colorado travertine, the ark (which contained the Torahs) framed with gray-veined cremo-Italian marble, as well as the gate with its Art Deco design, and the copper-colored menorahs flanking the ark. In 1981, architect-designer John Mike Cohen of St. Louis oversaw a major remodeling of the sanctuary with peach carpet, chairs, and fiberglass lights resembling a flock of dove. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188538/
[Beth-El Congregation's Second Synagogue]
Photograph of the entrance to the synagogue at 207 W. Broadway Ave. that served Beth-El Congregation from 1920 to 2000. The building has two stories plus a basement with a social hall and kitchen. It is constructed of red brick and limestone. In the photo, the facade has a frieze above the entry with a quote from Psalms ("Give Ear, O Lord, Unto My Prayer") as well as two limestone menorahs above the quotation. The stained-glass windows on the front and side of the building are protected by storm windows. This image shows the front of the building shortly before the congregation moved to a new location across town. Several of the decorative features, particularly the frieze and limestone arches, are stained with black marks from 80 years of air pollution. When the congregation moved in August of 2000, the frieze, menorahs, and a Ten-Commandment carving were removed from the facade and replaced with red brick. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188535/
[Interior of Beth-El Congregation Sanctuary]
Photograph of the interior of the second house of worship for Fort Worth's Reform Jewish congregation after being remodeled in 1981. This image was taken with the main lights turned off to show the sanctuary's 72 Castelli fiberglass lights, which evoke the imagery of a flock of doves. The stained glass in the background dates to the 1948 remodeling. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188537/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Breastplate]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a breastplate with twelve squares of color, representing the vestments worn by the Levites, the priestly tribe. Each of the twelve squares, colored like a precious gem, stands for one of the 12 Tribes of Israel. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188510/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Buck]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a deer or antelope that symbolizes the adventurous descendants of the Tribe of Naphtali. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188509/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Bull and a Unicorn]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two animals, a bull and a unicorn, to represent Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh. The one-horned animal, representing the Tribe of Manasseh, roamed the wilderness in ancient Assyria and is extinct; the bull represents the Tribe of Ephraim including Ephraim and his descendants. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature.This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188517/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Candelabra]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a Krakow candelabra with three branches. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts the original candelabra created in Krakow, Poland, during the 18th century by a coppersmith. The metalwork includes a pair of frolicking deer in reference to the opening lines of Psalm 42: "As the deer pants after the water brooks, so my soul pants after thee, O God." When the congregation moved in 2000, this pane was removed and stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188525/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Citron Container]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a decorative citron container of hammered silver to symbolize the autumn harvest holiday, Succot. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved in 2000, this pane was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188522/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Donkey]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a donkey, which represents the Tribe of Issachar whose descendants had strong but servile roles. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in Beth-El's Hall of Remembrance when the congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188518/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Lion]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a lion to represent Judah and his tribe of brave leaders. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188513/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Mandrake]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting the flowers of a mandrake plant, which represents Reuben. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. Biblically, the mandrake plant (fruit and roots) was believed to enhance a woman's fertility; Reuben gathered it for his mother, Leah. Leah had six children and also gave the plant to Rachel, who was barren but later conceived two sons. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188519/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Passover Plate]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an 18th century Passover plate engraved with scenes from the Passover song, "An Only Kid." In the center of the image is a star and a lamb; Hebrew words on the plate state, "Next year may we all be free." This is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188520/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Serpent]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a snake, which symbolizes the Tribe of Dan, whose descendants excelled at serpentine guerilla warfare. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188508/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Ship]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a ship to represent the Tribe of Zebulon, which had territory bordering the Sea of Galilee. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature.This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188514/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Shofar]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a shofar, a ram's horn sounded on holidays that begin the Jewish New Year. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a shofar similar to the German shofars carved during the 18th century, including the decorative ridges. This pane was removed and placed in the temple archives when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188521/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Spice Box]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a spice box in the shape of a medieval clock tower at 8 o'clock; this item is used during the prayer service at the close of the Sabbath. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image is modeled after the original spice box created by a German silversmith during the 16th century. When the congregation constructed a new synagogue, this circular pane was removed and stored in the Beth-El Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188528/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Teffilin Box]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an ornately-engraved metal box used to hold Tefillin, which are worn by Orthodox men during morning prayers. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a box designed in Poland during the 18th century. When Beth-El constructed a new synagogue in 2000, this pane was removed and placed in the temple archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188529/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Torah Mantle]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a red velvet Torah mantle with gold trim. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a custom-made mantle created in England during the 18th century; it is now in the London Jewish Museum. When Beth-El moved to a new synagogue in 2000, this pane was removed and stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188531/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Wolf]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a wolf, which represents the Tribe of Benjamin. The Bible describes Benjamin as a "ravenous wolf; in the morning he consumes the foe, and in the evening he divides the spoil." It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was transferred to a window in the Hall of Remembrance when Beth-El Congregation moved to 4900 Briarhaven Rd. in the summer of 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188516/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of a Wooden Platter]
Close-up photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a wooden platter in the shape of a Jewish star with a double eagle at the center and the date 1770 (in Hebrew). It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This kind of platter is meant to hold Matzo at Passover. The double eagle is a symbol of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. When Beth-El moved in August of 2000, this pane was removed, framed and presented to Broadway Baptist Church, Beth-El's long-time neighbor on Broadway Avenue on the city's near Southside. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188527/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of an Italian Sabbath Lamp]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an Italian Sabbath lamp hanging from a hook; this kind of lamp would cast a shadow in the shape of a six-pointed Jewish star when lit. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This pane was located in one of the stairwell windows of the building that the congregation occupied 1920-2000. This circular pane is presently stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188530/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of an Olive Tree]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an olive tree. It represents the Tribe of Asher, one of the wealthiest tribes of Israel. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved in the summer of 2000, this pane, and all the others that represent one of the 12 Tribes of Israel, was removed and placed in a smaller window in the new synagogue's Hall of Remembrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188512/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of City Gates]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting city gates for the Tribe of Simeon. It represents the city of Shechem, where Simeon led his brothers to avenge dishonor to their sister, Dinah. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El, When Beth-El moved in the summer of 2000, this pane was placed in a small window in the new building's Hall of Remembrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188511/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of Hanukkah Menorah]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting an 18th century German Hanukkah menorah. The candelabra's branches are curved like the flowering branches of a bush. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This circular pane is presently stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188507/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of Military Tents]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting a field of tents. It represents the military camp of the Tribe of Gad, which was known for its warriors. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved to a new building in the summer of 2000, this was among the panes reframed and placed in a window in the Hall of Remembrance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188515/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of Outstretched Hands]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two hands outstretched and positioned to deliver a priestly blessing. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image was copied from details on a decorative wall in St. Petersburg, Russia. Beth-El moved to a new location in the summer of 2000 and removed each of the symbolic panes. This circular pane is presently stored in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188526/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of the Scroll of Esther]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting the scroll of Esther (called a Megillah), a one-armed scroll that is read on the holiday of Purim. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created in 1947 for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. This image depicts a Megillah that has a Baroque-style silver case with a crown and dove of peace on the top; it is also embossed with a scene from the Book of Esther. When the congregation moved to a new building, this disc was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188523/
[Stained Glass Window Pane of the Ten Commandments]
Photograph of a stained-glass window pane depicting two stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments; each of the lines contains the opening words of a commandment. It is one of more than two dozen circular stained-glass discs created for the sanctuary of Fort Worth's Temple Beth-El; most of the images were copied from a book on Jewish treasures to represent a collection of Judaica in miniature. When the congregation moved to a new building, this disc was removed and placed in the Temple Archives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth188524/
[Ahavath Sholom Minutes]
Handwritten list of the thirty one members of the Ahavath Sholom Congregation in 1895 in Fort Worth, Texas. The front of the document lists the members of the congregation, and the back of the document lists the officers. When the list was created, Ahavath Sholom was the only synagogue in Fort Worth. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117179/
[Yiddish Minutes]
Handwritten minutes for the Ahavath Sholom Congregation in Fort Worth, Texas. The minutes are written in Yiddish, the native tongue of the members. The document discusses the Sabbath morning services for the congregation. The English translation of the document is as follows: "R Meeting Congregation Ahavath Sholom Fort Worth, Tex. Jan. 12th 96 The meeting was called to order at 3:30 P.M. by B. Levenson, President. The minutes of the last regular meeting were read and approved. The Committee to pay Armstrong’s note reported that the treasurer had paid Armstrong $25 and received a receipt for them. They received an extension for the balance with 10 per cent interest for 4 months. The committee was discharged. Brother S[am] Kalish had sent in a resignation letter, withdrawing from membership at Congregation Ahavath Sholom. It was ordered to strike his membership according to his wish. Brother Solshauzen read his resignation as secretary of the Congregation, which was accepted. L[ouis] Shanblum was appointed temporary secretary until the new secretary would be elected. The secretary was instructed to write postcards regarding the general meeting for the 4th Sunday in the month to inform all members that the election of a new secretary would take place. It was brought before the meeting that there should be a minyan every Saturday, pursuant to the bylaws reading. The secretary was instructed to write postcards to all members to come to daven on Saturday at the shul. 5.50 Dues collected 1.00 A[be] Mehl for a seat 6.50 .50 Payments for postcards 25.00 To Armstrong 6.00 Order to payment to the Home Building Association 31.50 The meeting concluded. Ben Levenson." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117181/
[Yiddish Minutes]
Handwritten minutes for the Ahavath Sholom Congregation in Fort Worth, Texas. The minutes are written in Yiddish, the native tongue of the members. The minutes discuss a legal dispute with a "chazzan," or a prayer leader who sued the congregation. The English translation of the document is as follows: "R. Meeting Congregation Ahavath Sholom Fort Worth, Tex. October 6th 1895. The meeting was called to order at 4 P.M. by B[en] Levenson, President. The minutes of the last regular meeting were read and approved. The committee regarding the auditing of the treasurer’s books of Brother Jacobs’ brought in a report that everything was in order and correct. The committee was discharged. The bylaws were read at the meeting and it was moved and seconded that they should be adopted and henceforth the full power of the by-laws are in force. The bylaws committee was discharged with thanks. Brother Jacobs and B[rother] President were appointed to settle with the lawyer about the chazzan, and they have the full power to settle. Mr. Salsberg was accepted as a member in Ahavath Sholom. A bill was brought in for esrog and lulav for $2.50 and was accepted. And a voucher was allowed to be drawn on the treasury of Ahavath Sholom. A receipt was brought in by J[acob] Samuels for spittoons for $3.00 and was applied as a $2.00 donation and a dollar for a seat. The committee for providing the esrog is dismissed with thanks. Collected in donations $3; dues 50-cents. The meeting was closed. B. Levenson." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117180/
[George Marshall's Sympathy Card]
A letter from General George C. Marshall, the United States Army Chief of Staff, expressing his condolences for the death of an unidentified soldier. The text reads: "General Marshall extends his deep sympathy in your bereavement. Your son fought valiantly in a supreme hour of his country's need. His memory will live in the grateful heart of our nation." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117200/
[Letter to Ahavath Sholom]
Typed letter from B. Max Mehl to the Ahavath Sholom Congregation. In the letter, Mehl responds to a dues statement sent to him from the congregation. The letter is requesting a corrected dues statement due to the congregation overcharging Mehl. The stationery includes a colored illustration at the top of the page that says, "Importer of and Dealer in Rare Coins, Medals, and Paper Money of all Countries and Periods" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117170/
[Ladies Cemetery Society Minutes]
Handwritten minutes for the Ladies Cemetery Society commenting on the death of Private Harold Gilbert, the son of the society's recording secretary, Rose Gilbert. The text notes: “The absence of the secretary ...who had the misfortune of losing her son, Harold, Dec. 25, 1944, in the European Theater of the war, made the meeting a sad one; each and every one of the members present were in tears.” On the second page of the minutes, the group’s long-time president Mrs. Becky Goldstein recalls how she and Mrs. Gilbert used to “go out to collect dues at 25 cents each. Mrs. Gilbert furnished the horse and buggy.” texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117208/
AZA Banquet
Photograph of an Aleph Zadik Aleph (AZA) Banquet in the ballroom of Fort Worth's Hebrew Institute in the 800 block Taylor Street. The banquet room contains a stage and a piano in the background of the photograph. Members are seated at long tables. From left to right, the members of the photograph are: Cooks (back left, standing): Joe Zenick, Manny Solomon, P.D. Mallin, Sidney Cohen, "Uncle" Lou Cohen. Head Banquet Table (along the stage in the back, to the right of the cooks): Mary Frances Ginsberg, Robert Lidell, Ann Lidell, Rabbi Isadore Garsek, Sadye Mae Garsek, Rabbi Prero, R.D. Moses, Idelle Engelberg, Reuben Daiches, Mrs. Reuben Daiches, Mickey Goldman, Charlotte Max Goldman, unidentified, Adelene Zeff. Members seated at the foreground tables are listed from bottom right to back left. Table 1, row 1: Hy Glickman, Rose Glickman, Ada Robinson, M.Y. Robinson, Mr. Schwartz, Mrs. Schwartz, Mary Sankary, Ann Cohen, Ben Cohen, Selma Tiras, Miss Sankary, unidentified woman, Max Gilbert. Table 1, row 2: Goldie Tills, Joe Tills, Mrs. Kruger, Mr. Kruger, Herb Berkowitz, Adele Natkin, Sue Louis, Gloria Holtzman, Herbert Cooles, Mr. Gilbert, Charlie Levinson, Sam Anton, Bess Levinson, Sarah Anton. Table 2, row 1: Joe Siegel, Leon Tiras, Joe Daiches, Reuben Hillman, unidentified, Goldie Hillman, Ruth Sandler, unidentified man, Sarah Zeff, Sam Saikin, Meyer Zeff, Woff Moses, Aida Moses. Table 2, row 2: unidentified. Table 3, row 1: Abe Cohen, Roselle Cooles, Marshall Hillman, Easer Rovinsky, Lee Laves, Joe A. Sandler, Edward Luskey, Gilbert Friedson. Table 3, row 2: Samuel Sheinberg, Norman Rubin, Mrs. Friedman, Cantor Friedman, Rabbi Charles Blumenthal, Mrs. Blumenthal, unidentified boy, Mimi Bronstein, Danny Glazer. Table 4, row 1: Katheryn Spigel, Sam Spigel, Liz Spigel, Rose Luskey, Jake Luskey, Louis Luskey. Table 4, row 2: Dianne Solomon, Julius Solomon, Selma Solomon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117197/
[Sample Jewish Marriage Certificate]
Sample marriage certificate (called a Ketubah) presented to couples married at the Congregation Ahavath Sholom in Fort Worth, Texas as of 1990. The certificate includes three panels. On the far left, text primarily in English describes the vows of marriage. In the center, the main text of the certificate is in Hebrew with blanks for specific information; the text is surrounded by illustrations of plants and crops. On the far right there are lines for names and signatures of participants and witnesses. This form was designed by the Rabbinical Assembly (an organization of American Conservative rabbis). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117175/
[B'nai B'rith Youth District Convention]
Photograph of the teenagers at a 1956 B'nai B'rith Youth Organization (BBYO) district convention n Montgomery, Alabama. The conclave was at Huntingdon College. The male wing of the organization is called Aleph Zadik Aleph (AZA), and the female wing is called B'nai B'rith Girls (BBG). Text at the bottom of the photograph says, "BBYO District 7 Convention, Huntington College June 5-10, 1956 Montgomery, Ala." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117199/
[Zionist Convention]
Photograph of the Texas Zionist Association Convention at the Shearith Israel Congregation in Dallas, Texas. There are men and women in suits and dresses seated outside the synagogue. There is a Star of David above the doorway of the synagogue with a Hebrew word that translates to "Zion" as well as American and Zionist flags hanging from the building. From left to right, the known members seated in the front row are: Moses Shanblum (fourth from left), Joe Jacobs (fifth from the right), William Goldstein, Israel N. Mehl (with his two children). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth117210/
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