You limited your search to:

 Collection: Texas History Collection
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Hall Cemetery]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Hall Cemetery]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Hall Cemetery in Howe, Texas. Text: Located on land patented by Anderson White (1801-85), on certificate issued April 23, 1850, by Peters Colony, an immigration project which had received a large land grant in this region from the Republic of Texas. Burial plot was begun Jan. 6, 1857, upon the death of White's daughter, Sarah White Haning, wife of Aaron Haning. One week later, on Jan. 13, a second grave was added, that of Haning's mother, Rachel Pierce Haning. In June 1857, White sold his land in the area, but reserved 2 acres surrounding the burial site, deeded April 1859 to trustees for a public cemetery. Named for Benjamin F. Hall (1803-73), pioneer minister of the Disciples of Christ, doctor, dentist, and lawyer, who owned the white property from 1857 to 1872, and founded several churches in the region. Among those buried here are the first settlers of this part of Grayson County, who migrated to Texas from the Eastern United States, a number of veterans of the army of the Confederate States of America: and several rural victims of the Great Sherman Tornado of May 15, 1896. Subsequent donations of ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Home of Thomas V. Munson]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Home of Thomas V. Munson]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Home of Thomas V. Munson (1843-1913) in Denison, Texas. Text: World famed grape culturist. Earned second degree ever given at Kentucky A.&M. College (1870). Moved to Denison 1876; became a civic leader and had nurseries for wide varieties of plants. In 1880's helped France save vineyards from root disease, and became second American ever named to French Legion of Honor. His scientific papers filed in Washington, D.C., are still used by horticulturists. He and his wife built this home 1887. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark - 1967.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Joseph G. McCoy]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Joseph G. McCoy]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Joseph G. McCoy in Denison, Texas. Text: Livestock broker from Illinois whose pioneering in cattle markets helped Texans rebuild the economy which had been wrecked in the 1861-1865 by Civil War. Cattle had increased greatly in wartime. Texas had no market long drives were necessary, so that until Texas could get better railroads her $5 longhorns could be sold in the North at $25 to $30 or more. McCoy founded first adequate market for Texans, by securing cattle cars and building loading pens at the railroad in Abilone, Kans. This was near upper end of the trail started by the Indian scout and trader Jesse Chisholm and used by Texans on drives through Oklahoma to Kansas. He had part of Chisholm Trail surveyed and marked to aid the cattlemen. This was the best known of several cattle trails from Texas, over which some 10,000,000 beeves were driven from the state during the years 1866-1884. The M.K.T. railroad reached Denison in Dec. 1872 giving Texas its own North-bound cattle shipping outlet. McCoy moved here 1873 and helped establish on this site the Atlantic & Texas Refrigerating Co. to benefit ranchers by shipping ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: L.A. Washington, Jr. and Wife Martha A.]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: L.A. Washington, Jr. and Wife Martha A.]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for L.A. Washington, Jr. and Wife Martha A. in Denison, Texas. Text: Grandnephew of George Washington, who had been guardian of L.A.'s father was a doctor; came to Texas 1849 with inaugural suit. Personal letters of George Washington. Wife came from noted West Virginia family. Recorded - 1968.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Lake Texoma]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Lake Texoma]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Lake Texoma in Denison, Texas. Text: Completed 1944, Texoma is today the second largest lake in Texas and the eleventh largest reservoir in capacity in the United States. Its main purposes are flood control, power generation, and recreation. Lake Texoma was promoted largely through the efforts of Sam Rayburn (1882-1961), noted Speaker of the House who represented District 4 in Congress for 49 years. In normal operation, lake shoreline covers 550 miles, with the Red River Arm (45 miles) in Texas and the Washita Arm (30 miles) in Oklahoma. The waters covering 93,080 acres are impounded by Denison Dam. When Texoma was created it caused the relocation of railroads, highways, utilities, and cemeteries. The site of Preston, historically the Red River crossing for the Butterfield Stage, was submerged, as were the sites of Hagerman and part of Cedar Mills, Texas. In 1966 numerous recreation areas on Texoma drew 8,500,000 tourists, who could also visit Eisenhower State Park at the southeast end of the lake. The park was named in honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower, the thirty-fourth president of the United States. Texoma is one of more than 200 major inland lakes ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Miller's Spring]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Miller's Spring]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Miller's Spring in Denison, Texas. Text: On homesite bought Oct. 15, 1866, by J.K. Miller (1826-1908), this spring supplied his household, neighbors, travelers on nearby ferry road. Civic-minded miller gave alternate business area lots to the city of Denison; also sites for each early church, first public school, forest park. (1972).
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Old Bass Home]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Old Bass Home]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for the Old Bass Home in Denison, Texas. Text: Oldest extant house in city. Erected in 1850's, by Dr. R.L. Bullock. Built around typical "dog run" or entry hall. Had first window glass in county. Family home of Confederate Col. T.C. Bass since 1867. His daughter Netti, born here 1868, lived in home 97 years. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark - 1968.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Old Cedar Community]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Old Cedar Community]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Old Cedar Community in Sherman, Texas. Text: Settled in 1848 by Grayson County pioneers, who reclaimed land from wilderness. Raiding Indians and hardships of frontier life soon created need for a cemetery, established the same year. The plots were free to any person, many noted settlers are buried here, including one Union and 18 Confederate veterans of the Civil War. Of some 400 graves, half are marked. After community was well established, a school - Cedar Academy - was organized in 1871. D.H. Dumas gave the land for a 3-acre campus. Enrollment reached 79 in 1872. Here, besides the usual subjects, students learned how to make ink and split goose-quills for pens. Later, name was changed to Cedar High School. It merged with the Tom Bean District in 1937. Cedar Methodist Church was organized in 1871. The congregation worshipped in a log house on property deeded by J.G. Vestal and Colonel J.R. Cole. A half mile south of church on Whitemound-Cedar road, a 7-acre tract donated by Mr. and Mrs. B.M. Carr was used as camp ground for revivals. Each summer people would come for miles, pitch their tents there, and ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Pilot Grove]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Pilot Grove]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Pilot Grove, Texas. Text: Founded in early 1850's on Bonham-McKinney stage line called Lick Skillet, renamed, 1858, for J.P. Dumas' Ranch site of Lee-Peacock Feud, 1865-1871 between ex-Confederate Capt. Bob Lee with his gold and union supporter Lewis Peacock although Lee was killed in 1865 his followers carried on the flight until Peacock was shot. (1966)
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Sand Springs]

[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Sand Springs]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Sand Springs in Denison, Texas. Text: A noted watering place on pioneer trails. Known as early as 1840 to settlers and prospectors who camped near the strong currents of water boiling up at the foot of a rocky bluff. The sandstone of the bluff's face became an inscription rock, in which travelers carved names or initials and dates of their visits. Sometimes to assure friends or relatives who were to follow later over the same trail. A campsite for prospectors, including California-bound gold seekers passing this way, 1849-1850s. The spot was mapped in 1857 as a watering spot for the southern overland mail coaches of John Butterfield, racing from Saint Louis to San Francisco. After the Civil War (1861-65), many cattle herds passed this way for water while being driven north to market. When Missouri, Kansas, & Texas railroad was built to Denison townsite in 1872, Sand Springs gained new importance, feeding Waterloo Lake, built in late 1800s and used for many years (prior to 1908) as city's main water supply, but the old campsites were inundated. Other steps in man's progress reduced flow of the water. The area remained a ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West