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 Collection: Texas History Collection
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Hall Cemetery]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Hall Cemetery in Howe, Texas. Text: Located on land patented by Anderson White (1801-85), on certificate issued April 23, 1850, by Peters Colony, an immigration project which had received a large land grant in this region from the Republic of Texas. Burial plot was begun Jan. 6, 1857, upon the death of White's daughter, Sarah White Haning, wife of Aaron Haning. One week later, on Jan. 13, a second grave was added, that of Haning's mother, Rachel Pierce Haning. In June 1857, White sold his land in the area, but reserved 2 acres surrounding the burial site, deeded April 1859 to trustees for a public cemetery. Named for Benjamin F. Hall (1803-73), pioneer minister of the Disciples of Christ, doctor, dentist, and lawyer, who owned the white property from 1857 to 1872, and founded several churches in the region. Among those buried here are the first settlers of this part of Grayson County, who migrated to Texas from the Eastern United States, a number of veterans of the army of the Confederate States of America: and several rural victims of the Great Sherman Tornado of May 15, 1896. Subsequent donations of land by J. D. Barnett and Lee Bivins increased the cemetery to present size by 1918. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256787/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Home of Thomas V. Munson]
Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Home of Thomas V. Munson (1843-1913) in Denison, Texas. Text: World famed grape culturist. Earned second degree ever given at Kentucky A.&M. College (1870). Moved to Denison 1876; became a civic leader and had nurseries for wide varieties of plants. In 1880's helped France save vineyards from root disease, and became second American ever named to French Legion of Honor. His scientific papers filed in Washington, D.C., are still used by horticulturists. He and his wife built this home 1887. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark - 1967. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256926/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Joseph G. McCoy]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Joseph G. McCoy in Denison, Texas. Text: Livestock broker from Illinois whose pioneering in cattle markets helped Texans rebuild the economy which had been wrecked in the 1861-1865 by Civil War. Cattle had increased greatly in wartime. Texas had no market long drives were necessary, so that until Texas could get better railroads her $5 longhorns could be sold in the North at $25 to $30 or more. McCoy founded first adequate market for Texans, by securing cattle cars and building loading pens at the railroad in Abilone, Kans. This was near upper end of the trail started by the Indian scout and trader Jesse Chisholm and used by Texans on drives through Oklahoma to Kansas. He had part of Chisholm Trail surveyed and marked to aid the cattlemen. This was the best known of several cattle trails from Texas, over which some 10,000,000 beeves were driven from the state during the years 1866-1884. The M.K.T. railroad reached Denison in Dec. 1872 giving Texas its own North-bound cattle shipping outlet. McCoy moved here 1873 and helped establish on this site the Atlantic & Texas Refrigerating Co. to benefit ranchers by shipping dressed beef. The state of Texas owes much to the initiative vision, courage, and leadership of Joseph G. McCoy. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256815/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: L.A. Washington, Jr. and Wife Martha A.]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for L.A. Washington, Jr. and Wife Martha A. in Denison, Texas. Text: Grandnephew of George Washington, who had been guardian of L.A.'s father was a doctor; came to Texas 1849 with inaugural suit. Personal letters of George Washington. Wife came from noted West Virginia family. Recorded - 1968. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256958/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Lake Texoma]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Lake Texoma in Denison, Texas. Text: Completed 1944, Texoma is today the second largest lake in Texas and the eleventh largest reservoir in capacity in the United States. Its main purposes are flood control, power generation, and recreation. Lake Texoma was promoted largely through the efforts of Sam Rayburn (1882-1961), noted Speaker of the House who represented District 4 in Congress for 49 years. In normal operation, lake shoreline covers 550 miles, with the Red River Arm (45 miles) in Texas and the Washita Arm (30 miles) in Oklahoma. The waters covering 93,080 acres are impounded by Denison Dam. When Texoma was created it caused the relocation of railroads, highways, utilities, and cemeteries. The site of Preston, historically the Red River crossing for the Butterfield Stage, was submerged, as were the sites of Hagerman and part of Cedar Mills, Texas. In 1966 numerous recreation areas on Texoma drew 8,500,000 tourists, who could also visit Eisenhower State Park at the southeast end of the lake. The park was named in honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower, the thirty-fourth president of the United States. Texoma is one of more than 200 major inland lakes and reservoirs in Texas which contribute greatly to the economic and industrial growth of the state. (1968). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256824/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Miller's Spring]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Miller's Spring in Denison, Texas. Text: On homesite bought Oct. 15, 1866, by J.K. Miller (1826-1908), this spring supplied his household, neighbors, travelers on nearby ferry road. Civic-minded miller gave alternate business area lots to the city of Denison; also sites for each early church, first public school, forest park. (1972). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256850/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Old Bass Home]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for the Old Bass Home in Denison, Texas. Text: Oldest extant house in city. Erected in 1850's, by Dr. R.L. Bullock. Built around typical "dog run" or entry hall. Had first window glass in county. Family home of Confederate Col. T.C. Bass since 1867. His daughter Netti, born here 1868, lived in home 97 years. Recorded Texas Historical Landmark - 1968. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256861/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Old Cedar Community]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Old Cedar Community in Sherman, Texas. Text: Settled in 1848 by Grayson County pioneers, who reclaimed land from wilderness. Raiding Indians and hardships of frontier life soon created need for a cemetery, established the same year. The plots were free to any person, many noted settlers are buried here, including one Union and 18 Confederate veterans of the Civil War. Of some 400 graves, half are marked. After community was well established, a school - Cedar Academy - was organized in 1871. D.H. Dumas gave the land for a 3-acre campus. Enrollment reached 79 in 1872. Here, besides the usual subjects, students learned how to make ink and split goose-quills for pens. Later, name was changed to Cedar High School. It merged with the Tom Bean District in 1937. Cedar Methodist Church was organized in 1871. The congregation worshipped in a log house on property deeded by J.G. Vestal and Colonel J.R. Cole. A half mile south of church on Whitemound-Cedar road, a 7-acre tract donated by Mr. and Mrs. B.M. Carr was used as camp ground for revivals. Each summer people would come for miles, pitch their tents there, and attend services under a brush arbor. A frame church built in 1891 was destroyed by a tornado in 1960. The present structure was dedicated October, same year. (1970) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256704/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Pilot Grove]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Pilot Grove, Texas. Text: Founded in early 1850's on Bonham-McKinney stage line called Lick Skillet, renamed, 1858, for J.P. Dumas' Ranch site of Lee-Peacock Feud, 1865-1871 between ex-Confederate Capt. Bob Lee with his gold and union supporter Lewis Peacock although Lee was killed in 1865 his followers carried on the flight until Peacock was shot. (1966) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256876/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Sand Springs]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Sand Springs in Denison, Texas. Text: A noted watering place on pioneer trails. Known as early as 1840 to settlers and prospectors who camped near the strong currents of water boiling up at the foot of a rocky bluff. The sandstone of the bluff's face became an inscription rock, in which travelers carved names or initials and dates of their visits. Sometimes to assure friends or relatives who were to follow later over the same trail. A campsite for prospectors, including California-bound gold seekers passing this way, 1849-1850s. The spot was mapped in 1857 as a watering spot for the southern overland mail coaches of John Butterfield, racing from Saint Louis to San Francisco. After the Civil War (1861-65), many cattle herds passed this way for water while being driven north to market. When Missouri, Kansas, & Texas railroad was built to Denison townsite in 1872, Sand Springs gained new importance, feeding Waterloo Lake, built in late 1800s and used for many years (prior to 1908) as city's main water supply, but the old campsites were inundated. Other steps in man's progress reduced flow of the water. The area remained a popular picnic ground for years. Its history is revealed by the weathered carvings still visible on the inscription rocks. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256904/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: Sophia Porter]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for Confederate Lady Paul Revere, Sophia Porter, (1813-1899) in Pottsboro, Texas. Text: Settled 1839 at Glen Eden, a site now under Lake Texoma (N of here). Her husband, early trader Holland Coffee, built fine home. Guests included Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, other army of officers, 1845-60. During Civil War, wined and dined passing federal scouts found out they were seeking Col. Jas. Bourland, Confederate Defender of Texas Frontier, while guests were busy, she slipped out, swam her horse across icy Red River, warned Col. Bourland, helped prevent federal invasion of North Texas. (1965) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256912/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: St. Luke's Church]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for St. Luke's Church in Denison, Texas. Text: Denison's oldest house of worship and oldest episcopal sanctuary in Grayson County. Site given by Denison town company and visitation by the Rt. Rev. Alexander Gregg, first bishop of Texas, in May 1873. Cornerstone was laid in 1875 by the Rt. Rev. A.C. Garrett bishop of Missionary District of Northern Texas. Church was consecrated by him in 1876. The original building forms nave of the present church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256918/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: The Fitzgerald Home]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for the Fitzgerald Home in Denison, Texas. Text: Build on 800-acre farm near Bells by Geo. S. Fitzgerald. Who moved with family from Virginia to Texas in 1857. He cut building timber on his farm in 1859. On return from Confederate Army he erected this house in 1866. He was prosperous and esteemed, serving as a Grayson County commissioner from 1880 to 1884. House was framed of pegged oak logs. Main rooms are 20 by 20 feet, joined by 12-foot hall. Two stairs lead to upper story. Recorded Texas historic landmark - 1969. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256759/
[State Historical Survey Committee Marker: XXI Club]
Photograph of the State Historical Survey Committee marker for XXI Club in Denison, Texas. Text: Founded Oct. 14, 1890 by ten early social leaders. A charter member, Texas federation of women's clubs. Its 2-story brick hall, built 1896, was the first woman's clubhouse in Texas. Had facilities for music, drama, art. Gave Denison its first free public library 1896-1935. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth256975/
State of Texas Budget Message, Recommendations to the 55th Legislature 1958-1959 Biennium
Budget message for the State of Texas presented by Governor of Texas Price Daniel to the fifty-fifth Legislature of the State of Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6580/
State of Texas Governor's Message to the 56th Legislature, 1st Called Session, May 18, 1959
Text of an address by Texas Governor Price Daniel to the first called session of the fifty sixth Legislature of the State of Texas texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6581/
State of Texas Governor's Message to the 57th Legislature, 1st Called Session July 10, 1961
Text of a speech given by Texas Governor Price Daniel for the first called session of the fifty seventh Legislature of the State of Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth6582/
Statistics and information concerning the state of Texas: with its millions of acres of unoccupied lands...
This book covers statistical information for the state of Texas. It includes "great inducements for the investment of capital, health for the invalid, interesting sights and scenes for the tourist and pleasure seeker, broad fields of research for the historian, unsurpassed hunting grounds for the sportsman, and other resources waiting to be unlocked by the key of capital in the hands of labor and industry" (title page). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth130184/
[Steering Committee]
Black and white photograph of some of the original steering committee. Show approximately twenty seven seated individuals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39292/
[Stephen Curtis Speaking at TCAFS Annual Meeting]
Photograph of Stephen Curtis behind the podium, speaking at the Texas Chapter of the American Fisheries Society at the 2012 annual meeting during Technical Session 2. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth257089/
[Steven Curtis accepts award at the 2012 annual meeting banquet]
Photograph of Steven Curtis receiving Clark Hubb Student Research Scholarship Award from Ray Mathews at the 2012 TCAFS annual meeting banquet. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth257124/
[Stilted Clown at a Parade]
Photograph of an individual in clown make-up and walking on stilts at the 34th annual League City Village Fest parade on Kansas Street. People sitting and standing on the side of the road watch the spectacle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth279407/
The Story of Buffalo Bayou and the Houston Ship Channel
This booklet gives an overview of the history of Buffalo Bayou and of the Houston Ship Channel from 1820-1926. The text gives background on how the area became developed and eventually became an "Industrial Waterway of National importance" (p. [3]). The second half of the text focuses on Commodore Charles Morgan and the shipping aspect of the Channel. Costs of building, lists of important council members, and text of letters are included to illustrate the history. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46820/
The Story of Corpus Christi
This book describes the history of Corpus Christi through sketches of persons and events in the history of the city. According to the preface, it does focuses less on the history than on the people, "presenting in plain narrative form, a recountal of the days when Corpus Christi was young, of the trials and tribulations that fell to the lot of her residents in the war periods, and finally to emerge as a fast growing a progressive city of the Southland" (p. v). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth61115/
The Story of the S.M.S. Ranch
This booklet is primarily photographs of life on the S. M. S Ranch. Near the end are several text sections, the first of which states, "It is the design of the S. M. S. Booklet to give feeders and breeders both by picture and written word a comprehensive idea of our methods and breeding in which we have been so successful..." (p. 78). The first section gives an overview of the policies and buying options for the cattle company. Next, "Some Glimpses Into Ranch Life" gives an overview of how ranching works, defines ranching jargon, and gives several songs/poems that illustrate ranching. The third and final section, "Stock Farms and Small Ranches, From the Spur Ranch" includes photographs from Spur Ranch and a brief overview about the ranch and surrounding area. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46819/
Stratton Bros. Brick Garage, Richardson, Texas
Exterior of garage, brick construction. Three Stratton brothers standing in front: left to right, Kenneth Stratton, Jim Stratton, William Statler (Bill) Stratton. "Ford (tm) Authorized Service Station" sign on front. One gas pump in front of building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3133/
Stratton Bros. Garage interior, Richardson, Texas
Left to right: William (Bill) Statler Stratton, Kenneth Stratton, Jim Stratton. Visible on the left is the Model T they built from new and used parts. "Goodrich Tires - Best in the Long Run" sign hanging from the ceiling. Various machinery and parts. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3132/
[Street in Marshall]
A residential street, unidentified, in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17739/
[Street Scene, Marshall]
Marshall's N. Wellington Street intersects with W. Houston in the foreground of this street scene. Proceeding to the right, it intersects with W. Austin, which is in the right background. Going right to left along W. Austin, the viewer sees Abraham's Food Town, the historic Belle Fry Gaines House (white house with double portico), and First Baptist Church in the distance. The street at center running parallel with N. Wellington is N. Franklin, where several small businesses (unidentified) were located during the 1960s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18118/
[Street Scene, Marshall]
West Houston Street, looking west from the downtown square. On the left is a partial view of the new county courthouse. Beyond it is the Arnot House, on both the federal and Texas registers of historic places. In the distance on the right can be seen the red brick bell tower of Trinity Episcopal Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18170/
[Streets in League City]
Photograph of Butler Avenue and Galveston Street in League City. A few cars are on the wide, paved road waiting for a train to arrive. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth279051/
[Striped Chairs and Green Chairs]
Color photograph shows one person seated and one person standing in an area of Richland College. There are green bubble chairs in the room and there is striped furniture in the room. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth40241/
Structure-Section Sheet: Texas Uvalde Quadrangle
This structure map shows the topography, altitude above sea level, and a breakdown of the kinds of rocks and minerals found in the Uvalde, Texas quadrangle region. The map contains a legend that represents with colors and line patterns the surface contour of the region and the kinds of sedimentary rocks and minerals from diverse geological eras. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11821/
Structure Sections: Texas Burnet Quadrangle
This structure map shows the topography, altitude above sea level, and a breakdown of the kinds of rocks and minerals found in the Burnet, Texas quadrangle region. The map contains a legend that represents with line patterns the surface contour of the region and the kinds of sedimentary rocks and minerals from diverse geological eras. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11817/
Structure Sections: Texas Llano Quadrangle
This structure map shows the topography, altitude above sea level, and a breakdown of the kinds of rocks and minerals found in the Llano, Texas quadrangle region. The map contains a legend that represents with line patterns the surface contour of the region and the kinds of sedimentary rocks and minerals from diverse geological eras. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11816/
Structure Sections: Texas Van Horn Quadrangle
This structure map shows the topography, altitude above sea level, and a breakdown of the kinds of rocks and minerals found around the quadrangle region of Van Horn Texas. The map contains a legend that uses colors and line patterns to represent the surface contour of the region and the kinds of sedimentary rocks and minerals from diverse geological eras. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc11824/
[Student in Library]
Black and white photograph shows library range with student looking at books. There is a step stool behind the student. She has both hands on a row of books. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth40237/
[Student Lounge]
Black and white photograph shows the spacious lounge area at Mountain View College. It serves as the "living room" of the campus. The Dallas County Community College District feels much "accidental" learning occurs in such areas designed to intermingle students of various backgrounds. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth40235/
[Students and Teachers in Front of Schoolhouse]
Photograph of schoolchildren and teachers in front of a schoolhouse that has wood paneling and four tall windows. Boys are seated in the front row along with a man kneeling in the center, while older children and adults stand in the back. Text written in the bottom-left corner says: "Colbert, I.T. Public School. Mar. 6".07. Prof. H. G. King, Prin. Hendricks Photo, Denison Tex." A boy near the far left, center row, is marked with red pen. There is a handwritten list of names and numbers on the back of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth314285/
[Study Areas Inside Helen Hall Library]
Photograph of the ground floor interior of Helen Hall Library where there are several study tables, some with chairs, ready for use. Numerous bookshelves surround the study area. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth279180/
A study of rural schools in Travis County, Texas / by E. E. Davis.
Book describing the economic conditions, social conditions, finances, facilities and curriculum in Travis County Schools. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth26722/
Sun Oil Company, Production Research & Development Lab, Richardson, Texas
Aerial view. Sun Oil Company Production Research & Development Lab. Two one-story buildings, connected by a covered walkway. The larger building, in the foreground, is "E" shaped; the smaller is rectangular. Parking lot between with cars. Storage tank. Housing development visible in background, telephone/electrical poles, no trees or landscaping. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3117/
A Supplement To A Collection of Memories: A History of Armstrong County, 1876-1965
This text supplements the larger text with additional biographical and genealogical information and includes an index starting on page [11]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth91049/
[Supporters Discuss Need for Library]
Don Knutson and Audrey Kariel discuss the merits of a new public library for Marshall, Texas in a forum. Mrs. Kariel became the project director for the building, which opened in October, 1973. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17502/
[Supporters Present at Meeting]
Two library supporters, unidentified, make a presentation at a meeting, Marshall Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18767/
"Surrounded by Dangers of All Kinds": The Mexican War Letters of Lieutenant Theodore Laidley
This book contains a collection of letters written by Lieutenant Theodore Thadeus Sobieski (T. T. S.) Laidley between 1845 and 1848. The letters discuss life as a soldier during the Mexican War; most of the letters were written from various stations in Mexico. Each letter is bracketed by editorial commentary on the historical context and the collection is prefaced by a brief biography of Laidley's life prior to the first letter. Index starts on page 179. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc28333/
[Susie B. Jones McGee, Marshall Educator]
A native of Harrison County, Susie B. Jones McGee was educated in Marshall schools, followed by colleges in Arkansas, and finally Bishop College in Marshall. Receiving her teacher certification, she taught kindergarten and primary grades, eventually becoming principal of the primary department at Central School, the first public school for African-American children in Marshall. In 1914 she lived at the corner of Sanford and Alexander Streets in Marshall. No other dates are known. She is buried in Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17727/
[Susie B. Jones McGee, Marshall Educator]
A native of Harrison County, Susie B. Jones McGee was educated in Marshall schools, followed by colleges in Arkansas, and finally Bishop College in Marshall. Receiving her teacher certification, she taught kindergarten and primary grades, eventually becoming principal of the primary department at Central School, the first public school for African-American children in Marshall. In 1914 she lived at the corner of Sanford and Alexander Streets in Marshall. No other dates are known. She is buried in Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth17956/
[Sutton Home in Marshall]
The Sutton bungalow in Marshall has been adorned with wrought iron columns and railings. It is located at 704 W. Grand. The house was first the home of Charles H. and Eva Patterson. He owned the Palace Pharmacy on the Marshall Square. By 1949 both the house and the pharmacy were owned by A. S. and Addie L. Jackson. From 1957 to the current year, the home's owners have been listed as Walter L. Sr. and Sammie Sutton, teachers in the public schools. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth18134/
[Table with Holiday Decorations]
Photograph of a table inside the League City State Bank, decorated with a few festive holiday touches. A candelabra and a mini tree are set atop the table. Above the table is a large framed piece of art. A medium-sized office plant sitting to the left of the table is festooned in tinsel. To the left of the plant is a vault. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth279055/