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 Collection: Texas History Collection
Texas. Geschildert in Beziehung auf seine Geographischen, Socialen und übrigen Verhältnisse mit Besond Ererrücksicht auf die Deurtsche Colonisation. Ein Handbuch für Auswanderer Nach Texas...

Texas. Geschildert in Beziehung auf seine Geographischen, Socialen und übrigen Verhältnisse mit Besond Ererrücksicht auf die Deurtsche Colonisation. Ein Handbuch für Auswanderer Nach Texas...

Date: 1846
Creator: Solms-Braunfels, Carl
Description: This book discusses Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels' trip to Texas as commissioner general of the Adelsverein.
Contributing Partner: University of Texas at Arlington Library
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: 1924 Masonic Temple]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: 1924 Masonic Temple]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for 1924 Masonic Temple in Sherman, Texas. Text: Travis Lodge No. 117, A.F. & A.M., was chartered in 1852. This site was acquired in 1916, although this classical revival temple was not built until 1924. Designed by local architects John Tulloch and the firm of Clyce & Rolfe, the building features giant order columns and portico, fifteen over fifteen windows, and a segmental arch entry pediment. It remained the headquarters for the masonic lodge until 1985.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: 1931 Free Bridge Controversy]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: 1931 Free Bridge Controversy]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for 1931 Free Bridge Controversy in Grayson County, Texas. Text: As a result of late 1920s legislation in Texas and Oklahoma, the two states cooperated on a project to build free highway bridges spanning the Red River to accommodate rapidly increasing highway traffic. One of these bridges was near Colbert Bridge, a toll bridge descended from the mid-19th century Colbert's Ferry. When the free bridge was ready to open in early July 1931, the Red River Bridge Company, operators of Colbert Bridge, obtained a federal restraining order against the opening of the free bridge until contractual payments had been made to compensate the company for their anticipated loss. Texas governor Ross Sterling complied, but Oklahoma governor William Murray, who was not a party to the contract between the Texas Highway Commission and the Red River Bridge Company, asked Governor Sterling to join him in protesting the injunction. Sterling refused. Murray ordered the removal of barricades erected by the Texas Highway Commission. For twelve hours, traffic flowed freely across the bridge. By July 17, Texas Rangers guarded the southern side. Oklahoma highway crews rerouted traffic from Colbert Bridge to Preston Bridge several miles away ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Aaron S. Mangum]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Aaron S. Mangum]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Aaron S. Mangum (September 3, 1812 - August 10, 1884) in Sherman, Texas. Text: South Carolinian Aaron Mangum came to Texas with a Georgia battalion in 1835 and served under Colonel James Fannin at Goliad. Mangum took ill during an expeditionary mission and fatefully avoided death at the Goliad Massacre. He married Leonora Snively in 1836 and together they lived in Mississippi and Georgia before moving here to Grayson County about 1869. After his death the town of Mangum, Oklahoma, was named in his honor.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Allison Cemetery]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Allison Cemetery]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Allison Cemetery in Whitesboro, Texas. Text: Believed to date from the mid-1800s, Allison Cemetery occupies three acres of land. The oldest dated marker is that of a 53-year-old man who was buried in 1865, though some headstones have been moved or were destroyed over time, and older graves may be noted only by roughly shaped rocks. Most of those interred on this site are descendants of H. Dennis, Sr., and other area families. Notable graves include a family of influenza victims believed to have been buried in 1858 and several war veterans. Managed and maintained by descendants, the cemetery is still in use.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Andrew L. Randell]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Andrew L. Randell]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Andrew L. Randell in Sherman, Texas. Text: A native of Denison, Andrew Randell graduated from Princeton University and the University of Texas. He opened a law practice in Sherman and was active in civic and church affairs. He and his wife Vera (Harrison) had two daughters. It was in Freemasonry that he marked his greatest achievements, serving as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas; as executive secretary of the Masonic service association of the U.S., leading national disaster relief efforts, as a Director of the Dallas Masonic Homes, and as an advocate for Masonic Education programs, publication and ideals. Recorded - 2005.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Antioch Baptist Church]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Antioch Baptist Church]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Antioch Baptist Church in Bells, Texas. Text: Formally organized in 1861 as Antioch Baptist Church of Christ, this congregation first worshiped in a log cabin approximately 2.5 miles south of this site. S. J. Wright, R. T. Gardner and J. D. Thomas comprised the organizing presbytery. In 1872, the congregation moved to the Pink Hill community where it shared a building and land at this site with the Pink Hill school. Baptisms took place in Choctaw Creek and in nearby stock tanks. As a charter member of the Grayson County Baptist Association, Antioch became known simply as Antioch Baptist Church after 1886. The 1890s saw much growth, resulting in the dedication of a new building in 1890 and the establishment of a Sunday school in 1893. In the early 1900s, Antioch Baptist Church became active in foreign and home mission work, a tradition it has continued into the 21st century. A growing membership required the completion of larger worship spaces in 1919 and again in 1974. In the latter half of the 20th century, the congregation secured its first full-time pastor, enhanced its mission work in the community and abroad, and provided ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: B. H. Zauk]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: B. H. Zauk]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for B. H. Zauk (September 11, 1857 - May 12, 1919) in Sherman, Texas. Text: Bruno H. Zauk came to America alone at age 16 from his native Germany. He founded Sherman's first cigar factory in 1876, and became a naturalized U. S. citizen in 1880. Mr. Zauk acquired extensive land holdings in west Texas and Oklahoma. A successful immigrant who took full advantage of opportunities available in America, he served as Vice President of the Commercial National Bank in Sherman and the First National Bank in Bennington, Oklahoma.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron Cemetery]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron Cemetery]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Barron Cemetery in Collinsville, Texas. Text: Named for John Barron (1831-87), a Civil War veteran who came here from Virginia and bought a good farm in 1870. Married first to Delilah Ward (d. 1860s), then to Margaret McElroy, he had fifteen children. About 1875 he gave land for a church-school building and this community cemetery, where he and some other members of his family were later buried. William Jenkins (1829-78), who was also a Confederate veteran, is earliest known among some six dozen interments. Burial ground, closed about 1920 is cared for by descendants who have formed (1971) the Barrom Cemetery Association.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron-Veazey House]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron-Veazey House]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Barron-Veazey House in Van Alstyne, Texas. Text: Influenced by the prairie school of architecture in its form and its large, overhanging eaves, this home was built in 1905 for the family of Walter and Pearl Barron. A local merchant and banker, Barron sold the house in 1920 to hardware merchant R. Lee Veazey, in whose family it remained until 1965. Classical details such as the wraparound porch, fluted Corinthian columns, and Sullivanesque frieze along the roofline are also significant.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West