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 Collection: Texas History Collection
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Fred Douglass School]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Fred Douglass School]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Fred Douglass School in Sherman, Texas. Text: Named for the famed 19th century African American orator Frederick Douglass, the Fred Douglass School was created as one of Sherman's first three public schools in 1879. Two houses one block west of this site were rented for the education of the area's African American children. In the first years of the Fred Douglass School the number of students was about 85. By 1907 the school's population was 350. Fire plagued the Fred Douglass School: in 1904 and again in 1919 the wood buildings were destroyed. In 1920 a three-story brick structure was erected at the corner of college and East Streets. The school grew rapidly and by the 1939 plans for expansion were necessary. In 1943, educational improvements began to take place. More faculty members had advanced degrees and the curriculum was expanded to include African American history, business and vocational courses. A national honor society chapter was formed, and the sports program was expanded. A modern building was erected in 1957; ten years later, the school district became fully integrated, and the Fred Douglass School became the district's special education facility. In the ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Grayson Bible Baptist Church]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Grayson Bible Baptist Church]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Grayson Bible Baptist Church in Sherman, Texas. Text: On the evening of Monday, June 22, 1931, John R. Rice began a revival service on the Grayson County Courthouse Square. The revival took place where the 1870s courthouse had stood. That building was burned to the ground in May 1930 during mob violence that caused the death of an African American man who had been accused of a crime. Businesses and homes of African American residents were also destroyed. The revival's location - in the center of Sherman - was a perfect one. Large crowds of people attended, and the revival lasted for over a month. When rice asked attendees to present themselves to organize a new church, forty people answered the call, and on July 16, 1931, the fundamentalist Baptist Church was organized. On the evening of July 28, a tank was constructed on the courthouse lawn and a baptismal service was conducted. The congregation soon built a tabernacle at the corner of south Montgomery and East Cherry, and the first service in the building was held on Sunday, September 12, 1931. The church has changed locations several times through the years, ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Grayson College]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Grayson College]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Grayson College in Whitewright, Texas. Text: Original Campus Site. Founders: H.L. Piner - F.E. Butler, J.F. Anderson - J.L. Truett. Erected by Ex-students' association.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Greenwood Cemetery]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Greenwood Cemetery]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Greenwood Cemetery in Bells, Texas. Text: Burial site for early settlers of Fannin and Grayson counties. Commonly called "Jenkins Cemetery" - as access was through John J. Jenkins' farm. First usage date is unknown; oldest stones have had lettering erased by weather. Earliest dated stone is for Jas. P. Montgomery, who died in 1869. On March 31, 1882, W. S. Roddy formally deeded the cemetery site in trust for local citizens. Wooden markers at many graves were destroyed by grass fire in 1935. The neglected cemetery was restored in 1972 through efforts of Lt. Col. and Mrs. Wm. K. Langner, descendants of John J. Jenkins.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hagerman]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hagerman]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Hagerman in Pottsboro, Texas. Text: In 1904, James Patillo (J.P.) Smith platted streets here in a 10-acre wheat field and established the town of Hagerman, named for railroad attorney James P. Hagerman. The town consisted of 250 residents, a cotton gin, school, church, post office, railroad depot, and several businesses by 1910. The town prospered and grew to contain three churches and a three-teacher school. However, in the 1920s residents and businesses began to abandon the area when it became known that the creation of Lake Texoma would completely inundate the town. Lake Texoma was created in 1943. Sesquicentennial of Texas statehood 1845-1995.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hall Furniture Building]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hall Furniture Building]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Hall Furniture Building in Sherman, Texas. Text: Former Missourian and Civil War veteran Rufus Gaines Hall established a Sherman Dry Goods Store in 1868. The company prospered, in part because it sent 30 notion wagons to sell supplies to settlers on rural farms across 13 counties in North Texas. Hall's son, Dr. Hugh Logan Hall, joined the firm in 1872. In 1892, Dr. Hall and his father bought this property. Five generations of Halls maintained the growing business in this location for a century. Originally two buildings, the west side of the business was built in 1876 and the other in 1885; the buildings were united in 1936. A noteworthy example of an art deco commercial building, its asymmetrical facade features the bold use of bands of structural glass with black and ivory chevron stripes. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2002.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hendrix Cemetery]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hendrix Cemetery]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Hendrix Cemetery in Sherman, Texas. Text: A native of North Carolina, John Hendrix (1798-1893) came to Texas in 1846 with his wife, Ruth (Stradef) (1804-1882), their children, and seven other families. Their first camp in the area is marked by a large boulder in this cemetery. Hendrix ran successful farming and nursery operations and became a prominent and influential citizen of Grayson County. Shortly after his arrival, Hendrix established this cemetery, located on land he acquired after his settlement here. The one-acre burial ground eventually was deeded to Grayson County. The first known burial, that of the infant son of M. and D. Perdue, took place in 1848. John and Ruth Hendrix are buried here as is their son Josiah Tompkins and daughter Nancy Hendricks Jennings. There are approximately forty-five marked graves in the Hendrix Cemetery, many date from the last half of the nineteenth century and some display illegible inscriptions. An unmarked section in the Northwest corner of the graveyard was reserved for slave burials. Used for more than one hundred years by Hendrix family relatives and descendants. Close friends and associates, the cemetery is a significant reminder of early Grayson ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hiram Lodge No. 433, A.F. & A.M.]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hiram Lodge No. 433, A.F. & A.M.]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Hiram Lodge No. 433, A.F. & A.M. in Collinsville, Texas. Text: Chartered on June 7, 1875, Hiram Lodge first met in a building on the original Collinsville town square. Since 1881, when that building burned, the organization has met in six locations and shared facilities with local businesses and a school. In 1881, when the Texas & Pacific Railroad came through the area, Hiram Lodge, along with most of the town, relocated to be near the railroad tracks. Civic activities have included aid to Masonic widows and orphans, support of war bonds, and assistance to schools and the Scottish Rite Hospital for crippled children.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hopewell Baptist Church]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Hopewell Baptist Church]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Hopewell Baptist Church in Denison, Texas. Text: In 1874 this church was founded to serve the black community of this growing railroad town. Ministers from several Baptist churches in the county helped organize the new fellowship some of the charter members transferred from St. John Baptist church in Preston Bend. In 1877 fire destroyed the congregation's first meeting place. A frame building erected at this site was replaced in 1891 by a brick edifice. The present church was begun in 1915. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall spoke here in 1950. When Hopewell was host to the NAACP Regional Convention.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Howe Lodge No. 430 A.F. & A.M.]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Howe Lodge No. 430 A.F. & A.M.]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Howe Lodge No. 430 A.F. & A.M. in Howe, Texas. Text: Constituted on June 5, 1875, this lodge was organized in the early Grayson County community of Farmington (5 Mi. SW). Members voted to move the lodge to Howe in 1887, after the earlier settlement was bypassed by the railroad. In Howe, the first lodge hall was constructed above the early Methodist church chapel. Later facilities were built as the lodge grew. Part of its growth came as a result of a merger with the Dorchester Lodge in 1966. Numerous war veterans and civic leaders have been members here. Texas sesquicentennial 1836-1986.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West