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 Collection: Texas History Collection
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Antioch Baptist Church]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Antioch Baptist Church]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Antioch Baptist Church in Bells, Texas. Text: Formally organized in 1861 as Antioch Baptist Church of Christ, this congregation first worshiped in a log cabin approximately 2.5 miles south of this site. S. J. Wright, R. T. Gardner and J. D. Thomas comprised the organizing presbytery. In 1872, the congregation moved to the Pink Hill community where it shared a building and land at this site with the Pink Hill school. Baptisms took place in Choctaw Creek and in nearby stock tanks. As a charter member of the Grayson County Baptist Association, Antioch became known simply as Antioch Baptist Church after 1886. The 1890s saw much growth, resulting in the dedication of a new building in 1890 and the establishment of a Sunday school in 1893. In the early 1900s, Antioch Baptist Church became active in foreign and home mission work, a tradition it has continued into the 21st century. A growing membership required the completion of larger worship spaces in 1919 and again in 1974. In the latter half of the 20th century, the congregation secured its first full-time pastor, enhanced its mission work in the community and abroad, and provided ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: B. H. Zauk]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: B. H. Zauk]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for B. H. Zauk (September 11, 1857 - May 12, 1919) in Sherman, Texas. Text: Bruno H. Zauk came to America alone at age 16 from his native Germany. He founded Sherman's first cigar factory in 1876, and became a naturalized U. S. citizen in 1880. Mr. Zauk acquired extensive land holdings in west Texas and Oklahoma. A successful immigrant who took full advantage of opportunities available in America, he served as Vice President of the Commercial National Bank in Sherman and the First National Bank in Bennington, Oklahoma.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron Cemetery]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron Cemetery]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Barron Cemetery in Collinsville, Texas. Text: Named for John Barron (1831-87), a Civil War veteran who came here from Virginia and bought a good farm in 1870. Married first to Delilah Ward (d. 1860s), then to Margaret McElroy, he had fifteen children. About 1875 he gave land for a church-school building and this community cemetery, where he and some other members of his family were later buried. William Jenkins (1829-78), who was also a Confederate veteran, is earliest known among some six dozen interments. Burial ground, closed about 1920 is cared for by descendants who have formed (1971) the Barrom Cemetery Association.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron-Veazey House]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Barron-Veazey House]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Barron-Veazey House in Van Alstyne, Texas. Text: Influenced by the prairie school of architecture in its form and its large, overhanging eaves, this home was built in 1905 for the family of Walter and Pearl Barron. A local merchant and banker, Barron sold the house in 1920 to hardware merchant R. Lee Veazey, in whose family it remained until 1965. Classical details such as the wraparound porch, fluted Corinthian columns, and Sullivanesque frieze along the roofline are also significant.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Bennett-Richardson House]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Bennett-Richardson House]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Bennett-Richardson House in Whitesboro, Texas. Text: This residence was built in 1902 for the family of local business leader Bland Bennett and Grace (Dunlap) Bennett. Exhibiting Victorian and classical revival detailing, its prominent features include a 1-story wraparound porch with a pedimented primary entrance, a hopped roof, and corbelled chimneys. Its transitional floor plan is reminiscent of both center passage and American foursquare plans. The H.S. Richardson family purchased the house in 1942.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Bethel Baptist Church]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Bethel Baptist Church]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Bethel Baptist Church in Whitewright, Texas. Text: This congregation grew from an early prayer group established in the Bethel community in 1875. A small group met in the schoolhouse, which also served as a community center, for weekly prayer and bible study. On April 16, 1884, nine men and women met to organize the Bethel Baptist Church. These charter members were Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Autrey, Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Jones, and Mrs. Sarah Miller. The Rev. Bob Thomas served as first pastor. The small congregation grew rapidly and soon had more than 150 members. In 1897, this property was deeded to Bethel Baptist Church by Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Autrey, in the same year. During the pastorate of J. M. Harder, a one-room sanctuary was constructed. A 1918 storm damaged the building, but it was repaired and the congregation continued to worship there until another was constructed in 1937. Throughout its history, Bethel Baptist Church has served as a focal point for the small community. The congregation continues to maintain the ideals and traditions of its pioneer founders.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Binion Homestead]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Binion Homestead]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Binion Homestead in Pilot Grove, Texas. Text: Georgia Natives Thomas Noel Binion (1827-1900) and Pauline Walker Binion (1829-1915) migrated to Texas after the Civil War. They moved to the Oxford community in Grayson County where they purchased this 107-acre farm in 1871. Thomas and Pauline died, they were buried in the family cemetery Northwest of their homestead. The farm was inherited by their children. Eddie Binion became a merchant in nearby Pilot Grove, but moved back to the family homestead with his sister Sarah after the death of his wife. Eddie raised sugar cane and operated a syrup mill here from the turn of the century until the 1940s. The mill first used mules to operate the crusher, and wood fires to cook the molasses. When fuel oil and coal were readily available in the 1920s, a piston engine replaced the mule, and coal replaced the wood fires. During the depression years, cane continued to arrive but money to purchase coal and fuel oil diminished. The mule was reinstated, but the Binion syrup mill foundered in the 1940s. The mill was dismantled and the iron and steel sold for use in World ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Binkley Hotel]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Binkley Hotel]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Binkley Hotel in Sherman, Texas. Text: In the 1870s, a joint stock company was organized to construct a hotel in Sherman. One of the largest stockholders was Judge C.C. Binkley, a community leader for whom the hotel would be named. Binkley was also president of the Merchants and Planters (M&P) Bank, established in Sherman in 1872. The first two hotels at this site burned, and the second fire was reportedly set to cover an attempted robbery. The next hotel was built by the Sherman Hotel Company and operated by bank president C.B. Dorchester. The bank, then the Merchants and Planters National Bank, served farmers, ranchers, counties, and Indian tribes, becoming a financial hub for Texas and Oklahoma, and the close ties between bank and hotel attracted and accommodated business in the growing community. The Sherman Opera House, which brought in touring dramatic companies, added to the list of popular and prominent men and women who visited the hotel. Ladies would enter on the north, at the carriage entrance, and avoid passing the bar on their way to receptions in the dining room of the three-story hotel.
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Boy Scout Troop 1 (Troup 44)]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Boy Scout Troop 1 (Troup 44)]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Boy Scout Troop 1 (Troup 44) in Van Alstyne, Texas. Text: The U.S. Congress chartered the Boy Scouts of America organization in 1910. Just two years later, three Van Alstyne boys, Rowland Barnett, Otis White, and Rae Nunnallee, received a Boy Scout storybook. Barnett made a Christmas wish and, in March 1913, the Van Alstyne troop received its charter - one of the first in the state. W.F. Barnett, Rowland's father and Van Alstyne school superintendent, became the troop's first scoutmaster. Within a few years, Troop 1, as it was known then, helped establish other Boy Scout troops in the area, beginning with the communities of Anna and Elmont. The Van Alstyne troop worked from its founding date to serve its community. Through the 1920s, the troop helped in a citywide cleanup to control disease and insect population. In the 1940s, the troop's number changed to 44, and in 1948, the city donated land for a scout hut, which has since been used for meetings. in 1959, the troop took part in the relay of the Pan American Games torch as it traveled from Mexico City to Chicago. The Van Alstyne troop ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West
[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Butterfield Overland Mail Route Through Grayson County]

[Texas Historical Commission Marker: Butterfield Overland Mail Route Through Grayson County]

Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Description: Photograph of the Texas Historical Commission marker for Butterfield Overland Mail Route Through Grayson County in Sherman, Texas. Text: In the mid-19th century, mail traffic between the eastern United States and the Western states and territories was accomplished via Panama and Cape Horn. in 1857, Congress authorized the postmaster to contract a new overland mail service. The successful bidder for the southern route was John Butterfield, who agreed to convey mail twice weekly in 25 days per run. The "Oxbow Trail" originated at St. Louis, Missouri, and Memphis, Tennessee, then merged at Fort Smith, Arkansas. The stagecoaches traveled through Indian Territory (later Oklahoma) and across northern Texas to Tucson, Arizona, and on to Los Angeles and San Francisco, California, traveling 2,795 miles from St. Louis. The trail entered Grayson County by crossing the Red River at Colbert's Ferry and proceeding into Sherman. It crossed the county toward Gainesville in Cooke County en route to Franklin (later El Paso). The citizens of Sherman are credited with especially courting the mail route to use Colbert's Ferry instead of entering Texas near Preston (8 mi. upriver). Sherman became a distribution point in 1858, bringing mail service to Texas settlements. Waterman L. Ormsby of ...
Contributing Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West