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 Collection: Texas Oral History Collection
Oral History Interview with Norman Apelt, September 23, 2001
Interview with with Norman Apelt, an airplane mechanic during World War II. He discusses his service in the US Army Air Corps as an airplane mechanic in Pampa, Texas. After the war ended, Apelt was assigned duty in occupied Japan. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204478/
Oral History Interview with Lowell Dean Cox, February 1, 2005
Interview with Lowell Dean Cox, a serviceman in the U. S. Navy during World War II. He discusses joining the Navy and serving aboard the USS Indianapolis (CA-35). He was on board when the cruiser was attacked by a Japanese submarine and survived for five days in the water before being rescued. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204509/
Oral History Interview with E. R. Dolinar, April 5, 2003
Interview with E.R. (Ed) Dolinar, a serviceman with the U. S. Navy during World War II. He discusses going to boot camp, torpedo school and submarine school. He was on the SSN Stingray as a torpedo crewman that offloaded supplies and guerillas in the Philippines. It picked up stranded Japanese sailors and transported them to Australia. The Stingray was then decomissioned. He was then part of a crew that studied and stripped captured German submarines, and he discusses the differences between the U-boats and the US submarines. He also discusses the Bolomen, Filipino guerillas who fought the Japanese during the occupation. He also talks briefly about his experience of being hit with depth charges and gives his opinions on General MacArthur and President Truman. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204491/
Oral History Interview with Earl Smyth, Jr., October 20, 2003
Interview with Earl Smyth, Jr., a serviceman during World War II. He discusses his time aboard the USS Saratoga at the Battle of Midway and at Guadalcanal, where the ship sustained two torpedo attacks. He saw Pearl Harbor three days after the attack. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204486/
Oral History Interview with Buck Gibson, October 19, 2002
Interview with Buck Gibson of Waco, Texas, a veteran from the United States Navy during World War Two. The interview includes some of Mr. Gibson's background before and after the war as well as his personal experiences while in the Navy, including memories of his training, life in the Navy, the sinking of the USS Indianapolis, and what happened after he was rescued. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204487/
Oral History Interview with Buck Gibson, October 19, 2002
Interview with Buck Gibson of Waco, Texas, a veteran from the United States Navy during World War Two. The interview includes some of Strauss' background before and after the war as well as his personal experiences while in the Navy, including memories of his training, life in the Navy, the sinking of the USS Indianapolis, and what happened after he was rescued. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193880/
Oral History Interview with Richard Bennett, November 15, 2001
Interview with Richard (Dick) Bennett, a pilot during World War II. He discusses his enlistment in the Army Air Corps, basic training and flight school. He then went to a base in South Carolina to learn to fly B-25s. At Fort Myers, Florida he flew B-26 bombers and trained to fly them off of aircraft carriers so they could drop torpedos on the Japanese fleet during naval battles. He traveled across the Pacific to Brisbane only to be told that they didn't have B-26s for the crews; the colonel there knew nothing about the plan to launch B-26s from aircraft carriers, so they were sent to New Guinea to fly B-17s and supplement the crews for those bombers. From there they made bombing runs or "Washing Machine Charlie"-type runs to keep people awake at night on various Japanese targets in the islands, particularly the base at Rabaul. In fall of 1943, the Army grounded the B-17s due to the damage they had incurred and replaced them with B-24s. The men received manuals and were given only a few days to familiarize themselves with the new planes. They were then sent on bombing runs. He finished his tour of duty at the end of 1943, came back to the United States, and went on a War Bond drive throughout New York. He then went to Ohio to become a B-17 instructor, and traveled to various bases and training schools, including Alamogordo, New Mexico, where he visited only a day after the first atomic bomb test. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204497/
Oral History Interview with Albert Bouley, June 27, 2001
Interview with Albert Bouley, a U. S. Marine during World War II. He discusses his enlistment in the Marines just after Pearl Harbor; his assignment to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Division; the battle of Guadalcanal; malaria and dysentery; the battle of Cape Gloucester; the use of Pavuvu as a base; the battle of Peleliu; his return to the United States; guard duty at the Brooklyn Naval Yard and his service as an instructor in a heavy weapons school before the end of the war. He joined the Air Force 2 1/2 years later to be able to fly and work on planes, then retire to become a teacher in California, and finally settled in Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204475/
Oral History Interview with Arwin Bowden, March 9, 2000
Interview with Arwin Bowden, a marine during World War II. He begins by discussing his training in San Diego and New Zealand before the Battle of Tarawa. He describes being wounded in the battle, the casualties he saw, and being shipped back to Pearl Harbor for treatment before joining the battle of Saipan. He describes ancedotes about Japanese killing themselves rather than surrendering, eating food from a garden watered from rainwater running down from outhouses, the wages he made, and the time he had leave. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth224536/
Oral History Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, January 15, 2004
Interview with Lewis R. Hopkins, a pilot during World War II. He describes growing up on a farm in Georgia, going to college at Berry, and working for Sears, Roebuck, and the Royal Typewriter Company before joining the U. S. Navy. He tells an anecdote about joining the navy so he could go to New York to see the World's Fair, since he had heard the Atlanta Reserve would be making a trip to the Fair. He began flight training in Florida in December 1940, finished the next September, then drove cross-country to San Francisco after the Pearl Harbor attack. He eventually joined the USS Enterprise in April 1942 and saw the B-25 bombers in the Doolittle Raid take off. He was part of Bombing Squadron Six and trained under Commander Best to learn how to do scouting flights, navigation, and dive bombing. He then describes his participation in the Battle of Midway, the hours before take-off, his first view of the Japanese fleet, and his bombing mission. He was later assigned to the USS Hornet and had to fly off to a little island so that planes from the USS Wasp could land on the Hornet after their ship had been torpedoed. He contracted malaria while he was on the island. He transferred to the USS Northhampton, then back to the United States to train pilots in dive-bombing at Jacksonville, Florida. He then received post-graduate training in aeronautical engineering at Annapolis and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in order to research and develop aircraft logistics. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204496/
Oral History Interview with Garvin Kowalke, January 23, 2001
Interview with Garvin Kowalke, a pilot during World War II. He discusses joining the Army Air Corps, going to Air Cadet training to become a pilot, and training on various aircraft (AT-17, UC-78, P-36, P-33, T-6, BT-13, B-17, B-29) before becoming a B-29 pilot; he shipped out to Guam and flew standard and fire bombing runs over Japan. He discusses having to ditch the plane on the way back to Guam once when the engines failed, seeing another B-29 crew have to bail out over Toyko Bay and get picked up by a U.S. submarine that was in the Bay, getting pulled down to the fires when they were trying to hide in the smoke to avoid Japanese fighter planes, and getting caught in a storm by Mount Fujiyama, as well as collecting data such wind direction, speed, and temperature over Hiroshima for future bombing runs, which turned out to be for the bombers who dropped the atomic bomb. He also talks about flying over Hiroshima two days after the bombing and gauging how high the radiation levels were at different altitudes. He also talks about being in the Korean and Vietnam Wars, becoming a B-57 pilot, and adopting a baby boy from Germany after the war, then a little girl while he was stationed in Hawaii after the Korean War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204472/
Oral History Interview with James Macia, July 21, 2000
Interview with James "Herb" Macia of San Antonio, Texas, who is a veteran of the United States Armed Forces during World War Two. In the interview, Mr. Macia recalls memories about growing up as well as his days as a mining engineer, the Doolittle Raid, North Africa, Normandy, and D-Day. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204462/
Oral History Interview with James Macia, July 21, 2000
Interview with James "Herb" Macia of San Antonio, Texas, who is a veteran of the United States Armed Forces during World War Two. In the interview, Mr. Thomas recalls memories about growing up as well as his days as a mining engineer, the Doolittle Raid, North Africa, Normandy, and D-Day. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193884/
Oral History Interview with Charles Pase, April 12, 2001
Interview with Charles Pase, a marine during World War II. He discusses joining the Marines and training on New Zealand and other Pacific islands. He describes landing on Tarawa, the battle of Tarawa itself, and locating and burying the dead bodies after the battle. He also talks about going to Hawaii for more training before going to Saipan, various guns and artillery he used, encountering natives on Saipan and being in Nagasaki after the bomb was dropped. He relates ancedotes about having tonsillitis during the Tarawa attack, fights that some Marines got into with local Hawaiians while training there and prejudices against Japanese-Americans, mistaking a land crab that pinched the back of his neck for a bayonet, getting Dengue Fever, and faking a landing on April Fools' Day. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204474/
Oral History Interview with Hermi Salas, February 14, 2005
Interview with Oral interview with Hermi Salas, a U. S. Marine during World War II. Salas was assigned to the Third Marine Division and was present for the invasion of Guam in the Mariana Islands. He was wounded on Guam and evacuated to a hospital ship, the USS Solace. He also participated in the Iwo Jima landings. After a few weeks at Iwo Jima, Salas was wounded again and placed aboard the USS Solace. He discusses his experiences in the hospital recovering from the wounds he received in the Battle of Iwo Jima. Eventually, he made his way back to San Antonio. He also discusses a brief leave at home before he reported to prison guard duty in Corpus Christi. Upon being discharged after the war, Salas went to radio school and worked at Kelly Air Force Base in the Civil Service. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204507/
Oral History Interview with James F. Sansom, October 8, 2004
Interview with James F. Sansom, an officer in the U. S. Army during World War II. Sansom joined the Army in 1940 and began training on anti-aircraft guns in Florida. He was selected for Officer Candidate School (OCS) and was commissioned a second lieutenant in 1942. He was assigned to the 843rd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Air Warning Battalion, which made its way to India via the Panama Canal and Australia. Shortly after reaching Calcutta, the unit moved to Myitkyina, Burma. After the war, Sansom was assigned to Sagumo Prison outside Tokyo where Japanese war criminals were being held while on trial for war crimes. He describes some of the routines and residents in the prison. Sansom taught Hideki Tojo how to play card games like gin rummy. Sansom also describes the process of executing convicted prisoners as he carried out some sentences. In all, he executed nine convicted war criminals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204504/
Oral History Interview with Alan W. Saunders, October 8, 2004
Interview with Alan W. "Buck" Saunders, a pilot during World War II. He discusses joining the Army Air Corps, becoming an airplane mechanic, and going to flight school for pilot training. He was stationed in India and flew supplies into China over the Himalayas (known by pilots as "the Hump"). In China, he traded items such as jewelry or opium for information on Japanese troop placements in Burma. He also discusses his meetings with native Burmese and talks about later experiences he had after the war and during the Vietnam War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204505/
Oral History Interview with Alan W. Saunders, October 8, 2004
Interview with Alan W. "Buck" Saunders of New Braunfels, Texas, a veteran of the Army Air Force during World War Two. The interview includes Saunders' personal experiences while in the Air Force, including the China-Burma-India Theater and memories of flying cargo to China over the Himalayas. Mr. Saunders also talks about life before and after his service. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193886/
Oral History Interview with Ethel Reisberg Schectman, March 24, 2001
Interview with Ethel Reisberg Schectman regarding her experiences during World War II. She begins by discussing her family background: her parents were Jews born in Poland and emigrated to the United States. Ethel's European aunts, uncles and grandparents all likely died in the Holocaust. As a first grade student, she taught her mother, a Polish immigrant, how to read and write English. She recalls, wartime rationing, Victory Gardens, scrap drives, and antisemitism among her school-aged classmates in Dallas, Texas, and the end of the war. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204466/
Oral History Interview with Ethel Reisburg Schectman, March 24, 2001
Interview with Ethel Reisburg Schectman of Fort Worth, Texas, who was born in New York City during the Great Depression to Jewish Polish immigrant parents. The interview includes Hill's personal experiences of World War II on the home front, including memories of D-Day, iron metal scrap drives, victory gardens, rationing, V-E and V-J Days, and what it was like being Jewish in Dallas during that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193887/
Oral History Interview with David Straus, September 17, 2001
Interview with David Straus of San Antonio, Texas, a veteran from the United States Marine Corps during World War Two in the Pacific Theater as well as the Korean War. The interview includes some of Straus' background before the war and his personal experiences while in the Marines, including memories of Okinawa, various weapons, what happened at the end of World War Two, and his assignment in Korea. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204477/
Oral History Interview with David Straus, September 17, 2001
Interview with David Straus of San Antonio, Texas, a veteran from the United States Marine Corps during World War Two in the Pacific Theater as well as the Korean War. The interview includes some of Straus' background before the war and his personal experiences while in the Marines, including memories of Okinawa, various weapons, what happened at the end of World War Two, and his assignment in Korea. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193888/
Oral History Interview with Elliott Ross, May 1, 2001
Interview with Elliott Ross who joined the U.S. Navy during World War II. He discusses being a landing craft coxswain carrying troops and supplies from ships to the shore in seven invasions: Guam, Leyte, Luzon, Santacristo, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and as an occupation force in Japan after the surrender. He talks mostly about Guam, Leyte, Luzon, Iwo Jima, Okinawa and Japan, but also mentions burials at sea and on the beachs, seeing his brother's ship get hit by torpedoes, and the emotional toll of the war. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204469/
Oral History Interview with James Phinney, July 15, 2010
Interview with James (Jim) Phinney, an aircraft electrician for the U. S. Navy during Wold War II. He discusses joining the Navy, going through boot camp and becoming an aircraft electrician. He was assigned to the USS Lexington but abandoned ship after it was hit by a torpedo. He was rescued and was then sent to San Diego to be reassigned to the USS Enterprise. He mentions being at Guadalcanal and later aboard a sub-chaser. The crew crossed the Equator and consequently participated in an initiation ceremony, during which time Admiral Halsey was nearly shot by one of the ship's pilots who forgot to lock his gun. He also recalls some of the food he ate while at sea. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204520/
Oral History Interview with Joseph B. Brown, March 23, 2001
Interview with Joseph B. Brown of Abilene, Texas, who is a World War Two veteran of the United States Marine Corps. In the interview, Mr. Brown recalls memories of growing up and his time in the Marines, particularly from training, being wounded, and working campaigns in the South Pacific. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193879/
Oral History Interview with Joseph B. Brown, March 24, 2001
Interview with Joseph Brown, who was in the Marine Corps during World War II. He discusses going to Guadalcanal, various guns and artillery he used, the battle of Tarawa and getting malaria just before it, then going to Hawaii for more training before returning to the South Pacific and fighting on Saipan and Tinian. He also discusses being wounded on Saipan, having a bayonet run through his forearm and keeping the bayonet as a souvenir after the war, and he talks about some of his experiences and travels after the war. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204471/
Oral History Interview with David Lee Hill, September 20, 2003
Interview with David Lee "Tex" Hill of San Antonio, Texas, a veteran from the United States Navy during World War II in the China-Burma-India Theater. The interview includes Hill's personal experiences while in the Navy, including memories of pre-war flight training in Florida, the Flying Tigers, and the Salween River Gorge attack. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204493/
Oral History Interview with David Lee Hill, September 20, 2003
Interview with David Lee "Tex" Hill of San Antonio, Texas, a veteran from the United States Navy during World War II in the China-Burma-India Theater. The interview includes Hill's personal experiences while in the Navy, including memories of pre-war flight training in Florida, the Flying Tigers, and the Salween River Gorge attack. There is a photograph and a short biography of Hill after the interview transcription. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193882/
Oral History Interview with Jo Crutchfield, April 1998
A video interview with Jo Crutchfield (McMurry class of 1937) in which she discusses her memories of McMurry and of her acquaintance with Gypsy Ted Sullivan Wylie. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth404804/
Oral History Interview with Darris Egger, February 20, 2001
A video interview with Dr. Darris Egger (McMurry class of 1942) in which Dr. Egger discusses his experiences with McMurry. Dr. Egger was an ordained Methodist minister and served in a number of churches in Northwest Texas and North Texas Annual Conferences. From 1970 to 1975 and 1978 to 1984, Darris served as the District Superintendent of the Abilene District of United Methodist Churches. He was the Program Council Director for the Northwest Conference from 1975 to 1978. Dr. Egger also served as Trustee of McMurry University, Sears Methodist Retirement Centers, Methodist Hospital in Lubbock, Butman Methodist Camp, and the Methodist Mission Home in San Antonio. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth404809/
Oral History Interview with Robert D. Haines, May 15, 2002
Interview with Robert D. Haines, an American prisoner of war during World War II. He discusses the attack on Clark Field in the Philippines on December 8, 1941, as well as his experiences on the Bataan Death March. He also tells of his time spent as a prisoner of war under the Japanese at Camp O'Donnell, Cabanatuan and Bilibid prison in Manila. He encountered his brother, who was a civilian internee, at Bilibid. From there, he rode on a hell ship for 39 days to a POW camp in Formosa (Taiwan). When the Americans began bombing Formosa, Haines was moved via another hell ship to Tokyo, Japan. Not long after, he was liberated and returned to San Francisco, then Denver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204483/
Oral History Interview with O. H. King, September 28, 2002
Interview with O. H. "Karl" King of Fort Worth, Texas, who is a World War Two veteran of the United States Marine Corps. In the interview, Mr. King recalls memories of his travels, the Japanese attack on Clark Field, the Battle for Bataan, and when he was a Japanese prisoner-of-war. He also talks about other experiences he had while serving in the Marines and his life before and after the war. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204485/
Oral History Interview with O. H. King, September 28, 2002
Interview with O. H. "Karl" King of Fort Worth, Texas, who is a World War Two veteran of the United States Marine Corps. In the interview, Mr. King recalls memories of his travels, the Japanese attack on Clark Field, the Battle for Bataan, and when he was a Japanese prisoner-of-war. He also talks about other experiences he had while serving in the Marines and his life before and after the war. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193883/
Oral History Interview with Guinn Rasbury, April 30, 2004
Interview with Guinn Rasbury, a U. S. Marine during World War II. He discusses joining the Marines, being part of the invasion force at Florida and Tulagi Islands, having multiple malaria attacks, being transferred to Maine to cure his malaria, being transferred around the United States, and finally returning to the Pacific theater. He explains how being sick with malaria and getting bumped from a plane ride home saved his life. He shares anecdotes about sounding "Taps" at a memorial service for President Roosevelt and being chairman of the Second Marine Division Memorial Scholarship Fund Committee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204498/
Oral History Interview with Vivian Castleberry, March 29, 2012
Interview with Vivian Castleberry,a journalist in Dallas, Texas. The interview includes biographical information about her life growing up, her educational background, family life raising her children, and her international peace work. She also discusses her career at The Dallas Times Herald and the field of journalism. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc94258/
Oral History Interview with Nancy Lieberman, November 8, 2012
Interview with Nancy Lieberman, a sports broadcast journalist. The interview includes biographical information about her life growing up in New York, her time on the first women's Olympic basketball team, and her career as a coach, author, and journalist on ESPN. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc154712/
Oral History Interview with Rena Pederson, April 5, 2012
Interview with Rena Pederson, a former journalist in Dallas, Texas. The interview includes biographical information about her life growing up, her educational background, her career with The Dallas Morning News and other newspapers, the books she has written, and her work in communications and public affairs. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc94264/
Renilda Hilkemeyer Oral History Interview 1, May 23, 2000
The interview with Ms. Renilda Hilkemeyer begins with her early education and career. She explains how her career led to working in the field of oncology nursing. In this section of the interview, she highlights the development of training nurses, the stigmatism around cancer, and the value of hands-on experience. Ms. Hilkemeyer explains how she came to M. D. Anderson and the challenges she faced in developing the department of nursing, including staffing, interdepartmental collaboration, and institutional bureaucracy. The interview highlights the social issues of the time especially racial segregation and women in the work place. Ms. Hilkemeyer discusses the creation of a rehabilitation center at M. D. Anderson. She talks about her education programs to improve the care of patients. These broke role barriers and increased nursing qualifications. Ms. Hilkemeyer draws attention to her ground breaking education program for nurses in intravenous and chemotherapy procedures. This section also highlights her involvement in creating master and doctoral programs in nursing. Ms. Hilkemeyer discusses her awards and continued role in institutional committees since retirement. She concludes the interview in discussing the motivations and challenges in creating a child care center in 1963 and the honor of having it named after her in 1981. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth159740/
T.C. Hsu Oral History Interview 1, April 11, 2001
The interview with Dr. Tao-Chiuh Hsu begins with the doctor recounting his early career in the United States as a graduate student at the University of Texas in Austin and the University of Texas, Medical Branch in Galveston. He shares his story about how he stumbled upon the hypotonic solution to separate chromosomes for deeper analysis of genes. Dr. Hsu explains his reasons for leaving the Medical Branch and joining M. D. Anderson for better laboratory and teaching opportunities. He shares an anecdote about the original main building of the institution. The interview explores Dr. Hsu’s promotions and positions held within the institution and touches on his relationships and collaborative work with Drs. R. Lee Clark, Charles M. Pomerat, Felix Haas, and Daniel Billen. Dr. Hsu shares his cultural experiences in terms of language barriers, naturalization and family immigration process. The interview concludes with Dr. Hsu answering questions about colleagues who worked with him in his lab over the years. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth159741/
T.C. Hsu Oral History Interview 2, May 10, 2001
Dr. Tao-Chiuh Hsu continues his reflections with Lesley Brunet regarding his career at M.D. Anderson. The interview begins with a discussion of Dr. Felix Haas and the evolution of the department of biology. William R. Brinkley’s contributions and interactions with the department are recounted as well. Several of Dr. Hsu’s major accomplishments to science are highlighted including the development of chromosomal banding techniques, biological specimen banks, and cell preservation. The interview continues with a discussion of his sentiments regarding the re-organization of cell biology and his laboratory location within the Hermann Professional Building. A discussion regarding the collection of tissue samples from cats ends the interview. Several humorous stories regarding his personal life and work are also shared. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth163879/
Oral History Interview with David Braden, September 30, 2000
Interview with David Braden, a member of the U.S. Air Force during World War II. He discusses his training in the U.S. to become a navigator; his deployment to Saipan with the 870th Squadron, 497th Bomb Group, 73rd Wing; initial attacks on Tokyo in a B-29 bomber at high altitude (during which the jet stream interfered with the bombing raids); a low-altitude fire-bombing mission over Tokyo in March, 1945; living conditions on base at Saipan; a mission in which the B-29 he was on ditched in the ocean and his subsequent rescue; Victory in Europe (V-E) Day on Saipan; completing 35 missions; and going home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204465/
Oral History Interview with W. A. Henderson, 2007
Interview with Lieutenant Col. W. A. Bill Henderson of Gatesville, Texas, who is a veteran of the United States Air Force. In the interview, Mr. Henderson answers biographical questions and talks about his military flight training, traveling, and bombing the Kwai River Bridge during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth193881/
Oral History Interview with W. A. Henderson, September 20, 2003
Interview with W. A. (Bill) Henderson, a pilot during World War II. He discusses his time as a bombardier and navigator on a B-24 in the China-Burma-India Theater. His crew hit the bridge over River Kwai (Mae Klong) while making bombing runs along the Burma Railway and also flew runs to supply gasoline to various bases in China, India and Burma. He relates anecdotes about the food and living quarters on the bases and the time he saved his co-pilot's life. He helped his co-pilot land the plane after a bullet tore through the plane's nose wheel and injured the man's leg. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204494/
Oral History Interview with J. Edmund Kirby, March 1998
A video interview with Dr. J. Edmund Kirby (1908-2006), a McMurry alumnus (class of 1931), and his wife Ruth discussing their experiences at McMurry and their life together. Dr. Kirby was a professor of Bible at McMurry from 1945-1947, and later served as a McMurry Trustee. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth404810/
Charles A. LeMaistre Oral History Interview 1, May 6, 2004
Dr. Charles A. LeMaistre’s interview begins with the story about how he met his wife, Joyce Trapp LeMaistre. This story intermingles with his early career that lead him to his role as Chancellor at the University of Texas in Austin. Dr. LeMaistre offers insight into the effect desegregation had on the University of Texas campus and M. D. Anderson’s faculty diversity. He recounts how he was offered the presidential position at M. D. Anderson, the transition in administrative procedures, and growth of the institution. Dr. LeMaistre shares his wife’s personal fight with cancer and uses it as an example of how effective the institution’s policies and procedures. Dr. LeMaistre’s modesty in his administrative accomplishments shine a light on the high regard he had for his team and institutional family. The interview concludes with Dr. LeMaistre crediting members of the University Cancer Foundation Board of Visitors and donors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth159736/
Marion Wall Lowrey Oral History Interview 1, May 5, 2001
Marion Wall Lowrey talks with Lesley Brunet about her career, especially her role at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. She talks about her relationship with Dr. R. Lee Clark and his wife Dr. Bert Davis Clark. She also talks about the time when the institution was housed at the Baker Estate and segregation in the early years of the institution. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth159738/
Oral History Interview with Jessie Clark, June 6, 2002
Interview with Jessie Clark regarding her experiences during World War II. She discusses having to adjust to a lifestyle of rationing for food products and shoes as well as blackouts and scrap metal drives. Her husband worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad and was often absent while she stayed home to raise their children in Houston. She discusses the scarcity of toys during Christmas and hosiery. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth204482/
Eleanor MacDonald Oral History Interview, May 19, 2000
Eleanor MacDonald talks with Louis Marchifava about her early life and education in New England; her early career in the Cancer Division in the American College of Surgeons; her recruitment and subsequent work at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute; her work in developing the biostatistics coding in the early years of the institution; and her relationship with various physicians and luminaries of the Texas Medical Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth159737/
Thomas S. Matney Oral History Interview 1, September 27, 2007,
Dr. Thomas S. Matney talks with Lesley W. Brunet discuss his youth, family, education, and career at MD Anderson. He begins the interview by talking about growing up in Texas and attending Trinity University of his bachelor's and master's degrees. He discusses his early career at MD Anderson and his research into bacteria and genetics. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth163881/
Oral History Interview with Dora Geneva Clement
Interview with Dora Geneva (Clement) Talkington (1886-1976) discussing how her family came to Texas and about growing up on her parents' farm, as well as other events including Theodore Roosevelt's visit to Waco when he was campaigning to be president. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth191369/