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 County: Palo Pinto County, TX
 Collection: Photographing Texas
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the front of the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, built 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972. It is at least twelve stories tall.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, built 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, built 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972. The building is at least twelve stories tall.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, colonnade

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, colonnade

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the colonnade near the front entrance of the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. It was built in 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972. The floor is made of red brick, and the walls of slightly lighter brick.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, colonnade

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, colonnade

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the colonnade at the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells. It was built in 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, detail of doorway

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, detail of doorway

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the doorway to the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. There are double doors in white with glass windows. The door on the left has a sign warning against trespassing. The hotel was built in 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, detail of top floor -  the "Cloud Room"

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, detail of top floor - the "Cloud Room"

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of the top floor, called the "Cloud Room", at the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. There is a balcony around the wall. Several of the windows have been punched out. The hotel was built in 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, flyer for the official website

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, flyer for the official website

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a flier for the official website for the Baker Hotel, in Mineral Wells, Texas. It has been pasted into a window.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
[Brown Stone Building]

[Brown Stone Building]

Date: May 2, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a brown stone building in Mineral Wells, Texas. A road is visible in the foreground, and there is a red truck to the left.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Historic Plaque, Courthouses of Palo Pinto County

Historic Plaque, Courthouses of Palo Pinto County

Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Description: Photograph of a historic plaque about the courthouses of Palo Pinto County. It reads: "Palo Pinto County was created in 1856 and named for a creek south of here that was perhaps named by Spanish explorers of the Brazos River valley. The county seat of 320 acres was surveyed at its geographical center and was originally named Golconda. A court session in 1857 called for the first courthouse to be built of wood frame construction, with two doors and three windows. The contract was awarded to a bid of $300. Shortly after, in 1859, the town name was changed to Palo Pinto. In 1882, just after the Texas legislature allowed counties to issue bonds for new courthouses, a large sandstone structure was built. It cost $35,000 and exhibited second empire styling with a central clock tower. A two-story sandstone annex was added in 1906 and connected to the courthouse by an iron bridge. Sandstone for the buildings was quarried south of the city. In 1940 these buildings were demolished and a new courthouse was erected by Work Projects Administration workers. The reinforced-concrete structure featured subtle classical detail and was clad with some of the sandstone from the old buildings. It ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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