You limited your search to:

 County: Harris County, TX
 Collection: Photographing Texas
San Jacinto Monument
Photograph of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. Most of the monument is visible, including the frieze near the base and the top of the column. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3677/
Detail of frieze on the San Jacinto Monument
Photograph of a portion of the frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. The visible corner is labeled "Lamar's School System" and shows three children lined up in front of a woman holding an open book and a man standing in the background. Portions of other images are also visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3676/
Frieze of San Jacinto Monument, San Jacinto Advance
Photograph of a frieze of the San Jacinto Monument. Two men on the far left advance to the right, above the words "Houston and Deaf Smith." Carved into the middle section of the frieze are many men with guns. A drummer and piper stand to the left, a man rides a horse in the middle, and two men roll a cannon forward on the right. The words "San Jacinto Advance" are engraved under the frieze. On the far right side, above the words "Lamar's School System," several children sit at desks in front of a woman who stands next to a tall man. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3674/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Colonists Forced the Mexican Authorities
Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It says: "In June, 1832, the colonists forced the Mexican authorities at Anahuac to release Wm. B. Travis and other from unjust imprisonment, the battle of Velasco, June 26, and the Battle of Nacogdoches, August 2, followed; in both the Texans were victorious. Stephen Fuller Austin, "Father of Texas," was arrested January 3, 1834, and held in Mexico without trial until July, 1835. The Texans formed an army, and on November 12, 1835, established a provisional government." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3675/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Early Policies of Mexico
Photograph of engraved writing near the base of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It reads: "The early policies of Mexico toward her Texas colonists had been extremely liberal. Large grants of land were made to them, and no taxes or duties imposed. The relationship between the Anglo-Americans and Mexicans was cordial. But, following a series of revolutions begun in 1829, unscrupulous rulers successively seized power in Mexico." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3673/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, The First Shot
Photograph of engraved text at the base of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. There is a family walking next to the monument. Text: The first shot of the revolution of 1835-36 was fired by the Texans at Gonzales, October 2, 1835, in resistance to a demand by the Mexican soldiers for a small cannon held by the colonists. The Mexican garrison at Goliad fell October 9; the Battle of Concepción was won by the Texans October 28. San Antonio was captured December 10, 1835 after five days of fighting in which the indomitable Benjamin R. Milam died a hero, and the Mexican army evacuated Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3671/
San Jacinto Monument
San Jacinto Monument texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3672/
Frieze of San Jacinto Monument, Building of Industries
Photograph of a portion of the frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. The segment is labeled "Building of Industries" and depicts men with shovels and beams on the left, men on horseback herding cattle in the center, and men with an oil derrick on the right. Partial images are visible on either side, labeled "Lamar's School System" on the left and "Stephen F. Austin Undertakes Texas Colonization" on the right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3670/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Texas Declared her Independence
Photograph of writing on side of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It had decorative stonework above. Text: Texas declared her independence at Washington-on-the-Brazos March 2. For nearly two months her armies met disaster and defeat: Dr. James Grant's men were killed on the Agua Dulce March 2; William Barret Travis and his men sacrificed their lives at the Alamo, March 6; William Ward was defeated at Refugio, March 14; Amon B. King's men were executed near Refugio, March 16; and James Walker Fannin and his army were put to death near Goliad March 27, 1836. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3669/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, On This Field
Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte. It reads: "On this field on April 21, 1836 the army of Texas commanded by General Sam Houston, and accompanied by the Secretary of War, Thomas J. Rusk, attacked the larger invading army of Mexicans under General Santa Anna. The battle line from left to right was formed by Sidney Sherman's regiment, Edward Burleson's regiment, the artillery commanded by George W. Hockley, Henry Millard's infantry and the cavalry under Mirabeau B. Lamar. Sam Houston led the infantry charge." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3668/
Frieze of San Jacinto Monument, Coming of the Pioneers
Photograph of the San Jacinto Monument featuring a frieze, "Coming of the Pioneers." Two couples, and a man, and a horse stand in front of a wagon. All three men hold rifles. To the left, there is another frieze, showing a man with a rifle facing a woman holding a piece of paper in her hands. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3667/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, With the Battle Cry
Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte. It reads: "With the battle cry, "Remember the Alamo! Remember Goliad!" the Texans charged. The enemy, taken by surprise, rallied for a few minutes then fled in disorder. The Texans had asked no quarter and gave none, the slaughter was appalling, victory complete, and Texas free! On the following day General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, self-styled "Napoleon of the West," received from a generous foe the mercy he had denied Travis at the Alamo and Fannin at Goliad." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3666/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Citizens of Texas
Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It says: "Citizens of Texas and immigrant soldiers in the army of Texas at San Jacinto were natives of Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Austria, Canada, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Portugal and Scotland." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3665/
Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Measured by its Results
Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte. It reads: "Measured by its results, San Jacinto was one of the decisive battles of the world. The freedom of Texas from Mexico won here led to annexation and to the Mexican War, resulting in the acquistion by the United States of the states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California, Utah and parts of Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas and Oklahoma, almost one-third of the present area of the American nation, nearly a million square miles of territory, changed sovereignty." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3664/
San Jacinto Monument
San Jacinto Monument. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3662/
San Jacinto Monument
San Jacinto Monument. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3660/
Fields around the San Jacinto Monument
Photograph of the fields around the San Jacinto Monument. There are trees and electrical poles in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3659/
Fields around the San Jacinto Monument with creek
Photograph of the fields around the San Jacinto Monument. There is a small body of water in the field, and buildings are visible in the distance. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3657/
Fields around the San Jacinto Monument with creek and bayou area
Photograph of the fields and bayou around the San Jacinto Monument. There is a small body of water in the middle of the field. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3658/
Bayou on the grounds of the San Jacinto Monument site
Photograph of the bayou on the grounds of the San Jacinto Monument site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3656/
Bayou on the grounds of the San Jacinto Monument site
Photograph of the bayou on the grounds of the San Jacinto Monument site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3655/
San Jacinto Monument with bayou in foreground
San Jacinto Monument texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3653/
San Jacinto Monument with bayou in foreground
San Jacinto Monument texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3654/
Plaque for the 1960 San Jacinto Day time capsule
Plaque for the time capsule that was buried for San Jacinto Day in 1960. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3652/
Battleship Texas as viewed from the San Jacinto Monument
Photograph of the Battleship Texas as viewed from the San Jacinto Monument. Cars are parked in front of the monument, and three flags fly behind them. The battleship is in the far distance, in the center of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3651/
Battleship Texas as viewed from the San Jacinto Monument
Photograph of the Battleship Texas as viewed from the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. The view of the ship is obscured by trees and foliage. It is in the middle of the photo. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3650/
San Jacinto Monument
Photograph of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas, taken near the base looking up at the top of the monument. At the bottom of the image, a part of the frieze is visible; it depicts several men going to battle including two with a cannon, two carrying rifles, a cavalryman with a saber, a flag-bearer, and two musicians playing a flute and drum. The scene is labeled "San Jacinto Advance." Other parts of the frieze are visible on the other faces of the monument: to the left, two men with the label "Houston and Deaf Smith;" to the right, a man and woman standing in front of children seated at desks with the label "Lamar's School System." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3649/
Johnson Space Center, NASA. Building 32
Photograph of Building 32 at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. A parking lot and walkway are visible in front of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3648/
Historic Mission Control at Johnson Space Center, NASA
Photograph of the historic Mission Control building at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3647/
[Kids Looking into Mission Control Room]
Photograph of kids looking through a glass window into a mission control room at NASA in Houston, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3646/
[Mission Control Room]
Photograph of a mission control room at NASA in Houston, Texas. There are pictures of rockets, and a badge showing an eagle on the moon with the words "Apollo 11" above it, in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3645/
[Man by Mission Control Room Display]
Photograph of a man with a backpack standing by a window looking into the mission control room at NASA in Houston, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3644/
NASA Plaque at Johnson Space Center
Photograph of a plaque mounted on a stone pillar outside the Johnson Space Center in Houston Texas. Text: "NASA - Johnson Space Center, National Historic Landmark, designated by United States Dept. of the Interior." The building is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3643/
[NASA Monument]
Photograph of a monument at NASA in Houston, Texas. The plaque mounted on the monument reads: "Apollo Mission Control Center. Apollo 11 Lunar Landing - July 20, 1969". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3641/
[Monument at NASA]
Photograph of a monument at NASA in Houston, Texas. The plaque on the monument reads: "Apollo Mission Control Center. Apollo 11 Lunar Landing - July 20, 1969". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3642/
Hangar X at NASA
Photograph of the "Hangar X" sign on the side of the Hangar X building at the NASA Johnson Space Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3639/
Johnson Space Center, NASA. Caution: Liquid Nitrogen
Photograph of a tank at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. A part of the tank is visible, including a yellow sign that says "Caution. Liquid Nitrogen, Temperature Minus 320°F." A building is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3640/
Banner: National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration, U.S.A.
Photograph of a banner hung on the beams of Hanger X at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The banner contains dark background with a circular seal in the center depicting planets and stars, surrounded by the words "National Aeronautics and Space Administration, U.S.A." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3637/
[NASA Hangar X]
Photograph of a banner, reading "NASA Hangar X", and a NASA flag on the wall of a hangar at NASA in Houston, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3638/
[X-38 Flight Test History]
Photograph of a display about X-38 flight test history at NASA in Houston, Texas, from 1995 to 2001. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3635/
[Machine at NASA]
Photograph of a camo green machine in a hangar at NASA in Houston, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3636/
X-38 Crew Return Vehicle at Hanger X
Photograph of the front portion of the X-38 crew return vehicle housed in Hanger X at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. There is a picture of the U.S. flag and "United States" written on the side of the vehicle near the nose. It is surrounded by a short glass fence and part of the hangar is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3633/
X-38 Crew Return Vehicle
Photograph of the crew return vehicle located in Hanger X at Johnson Space Center, NASA in Houston, Texas. The spacecraft is propped up on blocks and there is a sign at one side that says "X-38 Crew Return Vehicle." The walls of the hangar are visible in the background, covered in foil insulation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3634/
[Machines at NASA]
Photograph of several machines inside a NASA building in Houston, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3632/
[Kids at Mission Concepcion]
Photograph of a group of children wearing bright orange t-shirts walking towards a building at Mission Concepción in San Antonio, Texas. Trees are visible to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth3531/