You limited your search to:

  Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the north and east sides of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story house that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, a fountain in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25779/
[304 Main Street]
Entrance to 304 Main Street - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29207/
[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]
Photograph of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A sign outside the front entrance has information about worship services. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25684/
[411 S. Sycamore - A.S. Fox Home]
Photo of the A.S. Fox home, located at 411 S. Sycamore. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29192/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the front and south side of a two-story house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and brick around the lower level of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25773/
[418 N. Tennessee - St. Mary's Academy]
Photograph of the front entrance of St. Mary's Academy, located on the 500 Block of N. Tennessee Avenue in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with Gothic Revival-style features. There is a partially-visible stone tower above the entrance, as well as a stone arch over the door. Part of another wing is visible on the left side of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25644/
[501 S. Magnolia]
Charles Jacobs, a native of Prussia, and his wife Rachel Lucas Jacobs built a small one-story house on this site around 1877, according to local historians. Mr. Jacobs was the proprietor of a local men’s clothing store. Jack T. Harris, the subsequent owner, added a second story around the turn of the century. Later owners of the house included Steven E. Reed, who served as mayor of Palestine from 1931-34 and for whom Palestine’s first airport was named. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25798/
[519 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. There is snow on the ground and rooftops. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25780/
[619 S. Sycamore - A.R. Howard Home]
The dominant architectural form in the neighborhood in which this 2-story house stands is Queen Anne style; however, due to massive renovations, this building is now a somewhat rare example of Victorian Italianate style. A handful of similarly detailed houses are also in this neighborhood. All are among the oldest buildings in this part of town. This house is noteworthy because of its load-bearing masonry (brick) construction and its segmental-arched openings, bracketed eaves, and low-pitched roof. Local brick manufacturer/contractor Daniel N. Darling built this house in the mid-1880s; it is said to be one of two remaining Victorian-era brick homes in the city. Pennsylvania-born A.R. Howard (b. 1852) and his wife Katie Black Howard purchased this property in 1880 and enlarged the house in 1899. Mr. Howard was employed by the I&GN Railroad for over fifty years, working in a succession of jobs that culminated in his being named Secretary-Treasurer and First Vice-President in 1890. He was active in local Masonic activities, serving as grand commander of the Knights Templar of Texas during 1900-01. His wife, an Arkansas native, oversaw the formation of the local D.A.R. chapter in this house in March 1906. The 1899 changes included the addition of a 2-story veranda on the south; this was enclosed by glass in 1985. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25796/
[717 S. Sycamore]
The neighborhood south of the city’s central business district includes many fine late 19th century residences, and this 2-story frame dwelling is one of the most outstanding. The house has elaborate Queen Anne style detailing, seen most prominently in the porches and the gable ends. The intricate woodwork of the porch trim is an outstanding feature. The second floor windows with their round-arched upper sashes and pedimented architraves, suggest an influence of the Italianate style. The house is an important architectural landmark in the neighborhood and retains much of its historic character. According to the current owner, B.T. Scogin of Hamilton County, TX, built this house in 1878-79, to plans possibly drawn by architect Luther McKlemurry. Mr. Scogin and his wife Sarah sold the house in 1879 to Miss Roberta Hotchkiss, who lived here until 1882. She was followed by a number of residents who lived here only one or two years each. Price and Kate Blanchard acquired the house in 1918. Mr. Blanchard owned the P. Blanchard and Sons Dry Goods Company, located at 203 W. Main. By 1935 the house belonged to his son Lawrence W. Blanchard and wife Eloise. Mr. L Blanchard also worked at the family business. The house is still owned by the Blanchard family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25800/
[722 S. Magnolia - Lucas Davey House]
Photograph of the front and south sides of the "Lucas-Davey House," a two-story Queen Anne-style home located at 722 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. Distinctive features include the asymmetrical massing, a richness in details and materials and superb craftsmanship. There are trees and bushes around the house, obscuring the porch and first floor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25775/
[921 N. Cedar - Bailey - Summers House]
This grand 2 story residence located at 921 N. Cedar St. is one of the city’s premier examples of the Classical Revival style. The dominant architectural feature is the front portico with its 2 story Ionic columns. The building remains virtually unaltered with its historic integrity intact. According to city directories, this house was owned and occupied by Mrs. F.C. Bailey in the mid-1920’s, but from the mid-1930’s through at least 1941 the house belonged to Elbert J. and Bessie B. Summers. Mr. Summers was a real estate agent working out of an office at 115 W. Oak. Billy Bean documented this house in his 1980 survey. The house remains in the Summers family as of 2006. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25797/
[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link Home]
Copy print of the front and south side of the "H.H. Link House" located at 1003 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white house with both Queen Anne and Classical Revival-style architectures, including two-story Ionic columns across the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29366/
[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link House]
Photograph of the front of the "H.H. Link House" located at 1003 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white house with both Queen Anne and Classical Revival-style architectures, including two-story Ionic columns across the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25771/
[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link House]
Close-up photograph of the front walk leading to the entrance of the "H.H. Link House" located at 1003 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white house with both Queen Anne and Classical Revival-style architectures, including two-story Ionic columns across the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29250/
[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link House]
Photograph of the front of the "H.H. Link House" located at 1003 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white house with both Queen Anne and Classical Revival-style architectures, including two-story Ionic columns across the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29254/
[1011 N. Perry - Howard House]
The Howard House was the former home of Colonel George Howard and his wife, Cornelia Cox Howard. Built in 1851 the house is located on land deeded August 17, 1850 to Colonel Howard from Judge Reuben Reeves and his wife, Sarah. Colonel Howard and Mrs. Howard came to Palestine from Tennessee in 1849. Given the title of Colonel when he organized a company of men during the Civil War, he later served in the Texas Legislature, held several county offices and was Mayor of Palestine from 1886-1887. Colonel Howard was an active merchant in Palestine and in 1855 his store was located on the east side of the courthouse square. The Howard House of Greek revival influence is one of the best preserved examples of the ante bellum homes in the city. A walk of handmade brick leads to the house with its pillared portico and a center hall runs through the house with rooms on either side. There are a number of furnishings and other interesting items which are original to the house including a beautifully carved piano. The home remained in the possession of descendants of the Howard family until it was purchased by the City of Palestine on November 23, 1964 for a museum. Since that time it has been repaired and is being furnished by various organizations for meetings. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25656/
[1305 S. Sycamore - Broyles House]
This house is one of the most opulent and outstanding examples of the Queen Anne style in Palestine. This majestic 2 ½ story frame residence displays superb craftsmanship throughout the elaborate woodwork of the exterior. The building retains much of its historic character and integrity. Prominent local architect Luther McKlemurry designed and built this house for William McBurney Broyles and his wife Caroline Scott Broyles in 1893-94. An Alabama native, Mr. Broyles (1849-1925) was a prosperous East Texas lumberman, who played an important role in the economic development of Palestine during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was active in local real estate, and developed three new additions to the town, including the Broyles Addition, on which this house is situated. Much of the exemplary millwork featured on the house was manufactured in Broyles’ own Palestine mills. The house was later occupied by son Gordon Broyles, who lived here until his death in 1987. The house is still in the Broyles family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29380/
[1305 S. Sycamore - Broyles House]
This house is one of the most opulent and outstanding examples of the Queen Anne style in Palestine. This majestic 2 ½ story frame residence displays superb craftsmanship throughout the elaborate woodwork of the exterior. The building retains much of its historic character and integrity. Prominent local architect Luther McKlemurry designed and built this house for William McBurney Broyles and his wife Caroline Scott Broyles in 1893-94. An Alabama native, Mr. Broyles (1849-1925) was a prosperous East Texas lumberman, who played an important role in the economic development of Palestine during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was active in local real estate, and developed three new additions to the town, including the Broyles Addition, on which this house is situated. Much of the exemplary millwork featured on the house was manufactured in Broyles’ own Palestine mills. The house was later occupied by son Gordon Broyles, who lived here until his death in 1987. The house is still in the Broyles family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29326/
[1938 Palestine High School Band]
Photo of the 1938 Palestine High School band, marching in the Anderson County Fair Parade on Monday October 10, 1938 in downtown Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29244/
[Aerial Photo of Osjetea Briggs' Home]
Aerial photo of the home of Osjetea Briggs, which was located just out of the city limits on the highway going toward Rusk. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29163/
[Aerial Photo of Palestine]
Aerial view of the city of Palestine looking toward the north from the south side of town. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29256/
[Aerial View of Lacy Street - Palestine]
Aeriel view of Lacy Street with the home of Caldwell Green pointed out on the edge of the photo texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29263/
[Aerial View of Palestine]
Aerial View of Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25651/
[Alamo School Students - 1914]
Photo of a group of students from the Alamo School - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29378/
[Alamo School - Third and Fourth Grade Classes]
Photo of the third and fourth grade classes of Alamo School. A partial list of the students are as follows: Doris Parnell Elizabeth Link texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29148/
[Amende School]
Amende School was a private girls school which was located in Palestine before the advent of free public schools. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29372/
[American Home Bakery]
German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) founded the the highly successful American Home Bakery and operated the business at this site on the corner of John and Oak Streets from 1898 until 1918. He moved the bakery to 512 N. John in 1918 and renamed the business the "Eilenberger Bakery". It is still in operation at the location on John Street and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29322/
[American Home Bakery]
German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) founded the the highly successful American Home Bakery and operated the business at this site on the corner of John and Oak Streets from 1898 until 1918. He moved the bakery to 512 N. John in 1918 and renamed the business the "Eilenberger Bakery". It is still in operation at the location on John Street and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25727/
[American Home Bakery]
German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) founded the the highly successful American Home Bakery and operated the business at this site on the corner of John and Oak Streets from 1898 until 1918. He moved the bakery to 512 N. John in 1918 and renamed the business the "Eilenberger Bakery". It is still in operation at the location on John Street and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29385/
[Anchor from the Steamboat Ruthven]
This is a photo of the Anchor that was originally part of the steamboat Ruthven. The Ruthven was completed in the spring of 1860, though information concerning her home port and construction details are not clear. Before the civil war, the Ruthven seems to have been engaged in the Magnolia to Galveston trade carrying both goods and passengers. During the war she was chartered as a Confederate transport, hauling troops, military supplies, and the Confederate mails along with her usual cargos. As the war progressed and the Northern blockade of Galveston became more effective, the Trinity River trade tapered down to nearly nothing, suffering because of the inability to either ship cotton out or to receive goods on a regular basis. At the end of the war, however, this trend was reversed. Cotton and other agricultural produce once again flowed southward, and goods such as salt, flour, sugar, coffee, whiskey and clothing were brought north. At that time, shipment of cotton from Magnolia to Galveston cost from seven to ten dollars per bale. In Palestine, anyone expecting goods on a incoming steamboat would wait in town at "Steamboat Corner" until the steamboat blew its whistle as it came within a few miles of the Magnolia landing. All of those waiting would then proceed to the landing to receive their shipments. The river was so narrow at Magnolia that steamboats had to go several more miles upriver in order to turn around for the return trip to Galveston. While the Ruthven was leased to Captain Robert Mercer, the boat gathered into debt. A Captain Gordon then took command, but the debt, which remained with the vessel, was too great. A suit was filed by the crew against her for services rendered, and the courts ordered the boat to be sold. Captain Gordon managed to get a stay of execution for the court order and ran the boat until the next season, 1868, when he laid her up at Parker's Bluff. The boat was then sold at auction, the highest bidder being Col. George Wright, who bought her for $900.00. He had travelled up the Trinity on the Ruthven on her last voyage. The engines, boilers and iron were removed from her and sold, as Col. Wright expected to use the hull as a flatboat. She remained tied to a tree on the riverbank for a time, but soon she began to take on water until she sank to the bottom of the river in 1869. In 1912, when the water was low, the hull of the old steamboat became visible, as was its anchor. The anchor and bell were salvaged from the wreck by W.D. Small, who had been second clerk aboard the Ruthven, at the request of Dr. John M. Colley, then owner of Parker's Bluff. The anchor and bell were taken into Palestine to be exhibited on the lawn of the Young Men's Business League, later the Chanber of Commerce, but the bell dissappeared before the artifacts could be fixed in Place. This is where it was when this picture was taken. Later the anchor was moved to the front lawn of the Howard House Museum in Palestine and then was moved a final time to a monument that sits at the southeast corner of S. Magnolia and Spring Streets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29354/
[Anderson Campground - Brushy Creek Arbor]
This is a photo of the Anderson County Campground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into the 1950's. On the first Sunday of each September, a large homecoming of descendants of the early Brushy Creek families is held at the arbor. A program, business meeting, and meal are part of the agenda, plus a guest speaker and recognition of families. the annual homecoming is a popular, well-attended event. Many descendants still live in the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25638/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25636/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25674/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25696/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25701/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25718/
[Anderson County Farmers]
Photo of some farmer working in the fields somewhere in Anderson County. It is unknown who Mrs. Melba Wallace is or how she is connected to this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29352/
[Anderson County Jail - 704 Avenue A]
Photograph of the northeast corner of the Anderson County Jail building located at 704 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas, taken from N. Church Street. It is a three-story Art Deco-style brick building. A sign over the entrance says, "Anderson County Juvenile Center." There is a line of orange cones in the street in the foreground of the image, as well as several people: a man on a bicycle to the right and two women with a young girl walking around cones to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25689/
[Anderson County Pasture]
Photo of a pasture in Anderson County texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29384/
[Anderson County Tulips]
Beautiful tulips located at a home in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25667/
[The Arbor at the Anderson County Camp Ground - Brushy Creek]
This is a photo of the Arbor at the Anderson County Camp Ground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into the 1950's. On the first Sunday of each September, a large homecoming of descendants of the early Brushy Creek families is held at the arbor. A program, business meeting, and meal are part of the agenda, plus a guest speaker and recognition of families. the annual homecoming is a popular, well-attended event. Many descendants still live in the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29216/
[Arnold Hudson and Unidentified Man]
Photo of an unidentified man and Arnold Hudson standing in front of some parked cars in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25742/
[Autumn Leaves on a Dogwood Tree in Anderson County]
An Anderson County dogwood tree during the fall in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine, Texas. The tree's leaves have all turned red. Other trees are visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25712/
[Avenue A - Palestine]
Photo of Avenue A looking eastward toward the courthouse square. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25670/
[Avenue A - Palestine]
Photo of a snowy Avenue A, Palestine taken December 24, 1887 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29257/
[Avenue Baptist Church and Rev. A.D. Sparkman]
Photo collage including pictures of the Avenue Baptist Church and Reverend A.D. Sparkman. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25647/
[Barbershop Quartet]
Barbershop Quartet in Palestine Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25659/
[Ben Hassell with friends]
Photo of Ben Hassell with friends standing in front of an unidentified house in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29316/
[Best Service Station - Palestine]
Photograph of the Best Service Station - Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29261/
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST