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  Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
 Decade: 1970-1979
[301 S. Magnolia - Bowers Mansion]
Photograph of the north and east sides of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story house that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. Part of the yard is also visible, a fountain in the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25779/
[304 Main Street]
Entrance to 304 Main Street - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29207/
[412 S. Royall - Royall House]
Photograph of the front and south side of a two-story house, located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has a long, wrap-around porch with Ionic columns and brick around the lower level of the house. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25773/
[501 S. Magnolia]
Charles Jacobs, a native of Prussia, and his wife Rachel Lucas Jacobs built a small one-story house on this site around 1877, according to local historians. Mr. Jacobs was the proprietor of a local men’s clothing store. Jack T. Harris, the subsequent owner, added a second story around the turn of the century. Later owners of the house included Steven E. Reed, who served as mayor of Palestine from 1931-34 and for whom Palestine’s first airport was named. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25798/
[519 S. Royall]
Photograph of the front of a white, two-story, brick house located at 519 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. It has Victorian Italianate architectural embellishments, including the segmental-arched hoodmolds, bracketed eaves, and main entrance with its round-arched portal and hoodmold. Additionally, there are Queen Anne-style aspects, such as the fish-scaled, patterned shingles in the front-facing gable and the complex roof plan. There is snow on the ground and rooftops. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25780/
[717 S. Sycamore]
The neighborhood south of the city’s central business district includes many fine late 19th century residences, and this 2-story frame dwelling is one of the most outstanding. The house has elaborate Queen Anne style detailing, seen most prominently in the porches and the gable ends. The intricate woodwork of the porch trim is an outstanding feature. The second floor windows with their round-arched upper sashes and pedimented architraves, suggest an influence of the Italianate style. The house is an important architectural landmark in the neighborhood and retains much of its historic character. According to the current owner, B.T. Scogin of Hamilton County, TX, built this house in 1878-79, to plans possibly drawn by architect Luther McKlemurry. Mr. Scogin and his wife Sarah sold the house in 1879 to Miss Roberta Hotchkiss, who lived here until 1882. She was followed by a number of residents who lived here only one or two years each. Price and Kate Blanchard acquired the house in 1918. Mr. Blanchard owned the P. Blanchard and Sons Dry Goods Company, located at 203 W. Main. By 1935 the house belonged to his son Lawrence W. Blanchard and wife Eloise. Mr. L Blanchard also worked at the family business. The house is still owned by the Blanchard family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25800/
[722 S. Magnolia - Lucas Davey House]
Photograph of the front and south sides of the "Lucas-Davey House," a two-story Queen Anne-style home located at 722 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. Distinctive features include the asymmetrical massing, a richness in details and materials and superb craftsmanship. There are trees and bushes around the house, obscuring the porch and first floor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25775/
[921 N. Cedar - Bailey - Summers House]
This grand 2 story residence located at 921 N. Cedar St. is one of the city’s premier examples of the Classical Revival style. The dominant architectural feature is the front portico with its 2 story Ionic columns. The building remains virtually unaltered with its historic integrity intact. According to city directories, this house was owned and occupied by Mrs. F.C. Bailey in the mid-1920’s, but from the mid-1930’s through at least 1941 the house belonged to Elbert J. and Bessie B. Summers. Mr. Summers was a real estate agent working out of an office at 115 W. Oak. Billy Bean documented this house in his 1980 survey. The house remains in the Summers family as of 2006. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25797/
[1003 N. Link - H.H. Link Home]
Copy print of the front and south side of the "H.H. Link House" located at 1003 N. Link in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story, white house with both Queen Anne and Classical Revival-style architectures, including two-story Ionic columns across the front. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29366/
[Aerial Photo of Osjetea Briggs' Home]
Aerial photo of the home of Osjetea Briggs, which was located just out of the city limits on the highway going toward Rusk. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29163/
[The Arbor at the Anderson County Camp Ground - Brushy Creek]
This is a photo of the Arbor at the Anderson County Camp Ground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into the 1950's. On the first Sunday of each September, a large homecoming of descendants of the early Brushy Creek families is held at the arbor. A program, business meeting, and meal are part of the agenda, plus a guest speaker and recognition of families. the annual homecoming is a popular, well-attended event. Many descendants still live in the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29216/
[Betty Flanagan and the Dogwoods at the Carnegie Building]
Betty Flanagan standing next to a Dogwood tree in front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25709/
[Businesses on Spring Street]
Left to Right. Arnold Hudson Car Dealership and Trailway Bus station. Both business are located on the west end of Spring Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29219/
[Carroll Building of First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the Carroll Building of the First Methodist Church, which is located at 422 S. Magnolia, in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29309/
[Construction on the First Presbyterian Church - Palestine]
Photo taken during the construction of a new section of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25782/
[Demolition of a Building in Palestine]
Demolition of an unknown building on Spring Street in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25589/
[Demolition of a Building on Spring Street]
Demolition of an unknown building located on Spring Street - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25593/
[Demolition of a Building on Spring Street]
Demolition of an unknown building on Spring Street in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25761/
[Demolition of a Building on Spring Street]
Demolition of an unknown building on Spring Street in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25739/
[Demolition of a Building on Spring Street]
Demolition of an unknown building on Spring Street in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25717/
[Demoltion of a Building in Palestine]
Demolition of an unknown building on Spring Street in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25757/
[Dogwood Blooms - Anderson County]
Close-up photograph of Dogwood blooms in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25600/
[Dogwood Trails]
Photo of one of the roads in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine during the Dogwood Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25686/
[Dogwood Trails]
Photo of one of the roads in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine during the Dogwood Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25610/
[Dogwood Trails]
Photo of a young girl in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine during the Dogwood Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25624/
[Dogwood Trails]
Photo of one of the roads in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine during the Dogwood Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25665/
[Dogwood Trails]
Photo of one of the roads in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine during the Dogwood Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25632/
[Dogwood Trails]
Photo of a Dogwood Tree during the Dogwood Trails Festival. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25616/
[Dogwood Tree in front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree located in front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25622/
[Dogwood Tree in front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of blooming Dogwood Trees located in front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25620/
[Dogwood Tree in front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree located in front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25630/
[Dogwood Tree in Front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25679/
[Dogwood Tree in Front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25646/
[Dogwood Tree in Front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25764/
[Dogwood Tree in front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25731/
[Dogwood Trees in front of City Hall - Palestine]
Photo of the Dogwood located in front of City Hall, downtown Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25608/
[Dogwood Trees in front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of the Dogwood Trees in bloom located in the front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25604/
[Dogwood Trees in front of the Carnegie Building]
Blooming Dogwood trees in the yard of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25614/
[Dogwood Trees in front of the Howard House]
Photo of Dogwoods located in front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry Street - Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25612/
[Dogwoods around the Sacred Heart Catholic Church]
Photo of the dogwood trees blooming near the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, viewed from the northeast, on Queen Street in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25653/
[Dogwoods in Bloom in Front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of the Dogwoods blooming in the front yard of the Carnegie Building. This building housed the Palestine Public Library until 1985. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25639/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the First Methodist Church, which is located at 422 S. Magnolia, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29291/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the gardens of the First Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29294/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the side of the First Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29297/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the garden walls at the First Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29305/
[The Front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine]
Photo of the front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. This building once housed the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25672/
[Gatewood Shelton Gin - Crawford Street]
Photograph of the Gatewood Shelton Gin when it housed an antique store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29336/
[Highway Scene in Anderson County]
Photo of a county road in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25605/
[Hotel O'Neill - 313 Spring Street]
Palestine's O'Neill Hotel was located at 313 Spring Street but was actually the third hotel to sit on the site. In 1873, following the coming of the railroad to town, the Laclede Hotel was built there, but was destroyed by fire in 1876. The following year, a Dr. Manning of Oakwood erected a brick building known as the International Hotel on that location. It was purchased in 1882 by Col. George Burkitt who turned over operations to Mrs. Emma Nolen. During her tenure, the property was known as the Nolen Hotel, but when she moved to St. Louis, Col. Burkitt himself took over the management. That building was razed in 1922 and the "new" O'Neill, maiden surname of Burkitt's Irish born mother, was constructed on the site. The O'Neill boasted not only hot and cold running water in its guest rooms, it was also equipped with an electric Otis elevator and a radio receiving set on the mezzanine for entertainment of the hotel's guests. When Texas Gov. Ross Sterling declared martial law in the East Texas Oil Fields and ordered the National Guard to take it over and shut-in all wells, the O'Neill became the staging center where the command cadre spent its first night "in the field." During the oil boom, the hotel was a favorite meeting place for oil operators, lease hounds and geologists. Among the famous early day oil men who slept under its roof and conducted business out of its rooms were H.L. Hunt, Harold Byrd, Jack Frost and other wildcatters. Those were the "glory days" of the venerable hotel, but not the end. The hotel was sold a number of times, and despite halfhearted attempts to restore it, the condition of the building went downhill. It was demolished in August 1983 and the property is still vacant today. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29193/
[Jim Conaway's Grave in the Palestine City Cemetery Complex]
Headstone of Jim Conaway, who is buried in the East Hill section of the Palestine City Cemetery Complex. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25692/
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