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  Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Aerial Photo of Osjetea Briggs' Home]
Aerial photo of the home of Osjetea Briggs, which was located just out of the city limits on the highway going toward Rusk. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29163/
[Aerial Photo of Palestine]
Aerial view of the city of Palestine looking toward the north from the south side of town. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29256/
[Aerial View of Lacy Street - Palestine]
Aeriel view of Lacy Street with the home of Caldwell Green pointed out on the edge of the photo texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29263/
[Aerial View of Palestine]
Aerial View of Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25651/
[Alamo School Students - 1914]
Photo of a group of students from the Alamo School - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29378/
[Alamo School - Third and Fourth Grade Classes]
Photo of the third and fourth grade classes of Alamo School. A partial list of the students are as follows: Doris Parnell Elizabeth Link texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29148/
[Amende School]
Amende School was a private girls school which was located in Palestine before the advent of free public schools. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29372/
[American Home Bakery]
German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) founded the the highly successful American Home Bakery and operated the business at this site on the corner of John and Oak Streets from 1898 until 1918. He moved the bakery to 512 N. John in 1918 and renamed the business the "Eilenberger Bakery". It is still in operation at the location on John Street and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29322/
[American Home Bakery]
German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) founded the the highly successful American Home Bakery and operated the business at this site on the corner of John and Oak Streets from 1898 until 1918. He moved the bakery to 512 N. John in 1918 and renamed the business the "Eilenberger Bakery". It is still in operation at the location on John Street and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25727/
[American Home Bakery]
German immigrant Frederick H. Eilenberger (1878-1959) founded the the highly successful American Home Bakery and operated the business at this site on the corner of John and Oak Streets from 1898 until 1918. He moved the bakery to 512 N. John in 1918 and renamed the business the "Eilenberger Bakery". It is still in operation at the location on John Street and is famous for its fruit and pecan cakes, which it markets worldwide. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29385/
[Anchor from the Steamboat Ruthven]
This is a photo of the Anchor that was originally part of the steamboat Ruthven. The Ruthven was completed in the spring of 1860, though information concerning her home port and construction details are not clear. Before the civil war, the Ruthven seems to have been engaged in the Magnolia to Galveston trade carrying both goods and passengers. During the war she was chartered as a Confederate transport, hauling troops, military supplies, and the Confederate mails along with her usual cargos. As the war progressed and the Northern blockade of Galveston became more effective, the Trinity River trade tapered down to nearly nothing, suffering because of the inability to either ship cotton out or to receive goods on a regular basis. At the end of the war, however, this trend was reversed. Cotton and other agricultural produce once again flowed southward, and goods such as salt, flour, sugar, coffee, whiskey and clothing were brought north. At that time, shipment of cotton from Magnolia to Galveston cost from seven to ten dollars per bale. In Palestine, anyone expecting goods on a incoming steamboat would wait in town at "Steamboat Corner" until the steamboat blew its whistle as it came within a few miles of the Magnolia landing. All of those waiting would then proceed to the landing to receive their shipments. The river was so narrow at Magnolia that steamboats had to go several more miles upriver in order to turn around for the return trip to Galveston. While the Ruthven was leased to Captain Robert Mercer, the boat gathered into debt. A Captain Gordon then took command, but the debt, which remained with the vessel, was too great. A suit was filed by the crew against her for services rendered, and the courts ordered the boat to be sold. Captain Gordon managed to get a stay of execution for the court order and ran the boat until the next season, 1868, when he laid her up at Parker's Bluff. The boat was then sold at auction, the highest bidder being Col. George Wright, who bought her for $900.00. He had travelled up the Trinity on the Ruthven on her last voyage. The engines, boilers and iron were removed from her and sold, as Col. Wright expected to use the hull as a flatboat. She remained tied to a tree on the riverbank for a time, but soon she began to take on water until she sank to the bottom of the river in 1869. In 1912, when the water was low, the hull of the old steamboat became visible, as was its anchor. The anchor and bell were salvaged from the wreck by W.D. Small, who had been second clerk aboard the Ruthven, at the request of Dr. John M. Colley, then owner of Parker's Bluff. The anchor and bell were taken into Palestine to be exhibited on the lawn of the Young Men's Business League, later the Chanber of Commerce, but the bell dissappeared before the artifacts could be fixed in Place. This is where it was when this picture was taken. Later the anchor was moved to the front lawn of the Howard House Museum in Palestine and then was moved a final time to a monument that sits at the southeast corner of S. Magnolia and Spring Streets. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29354/
[Anderson Campground - Brushy Creek Arbor]
This is a photo of the Anderson County Campground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into the 1950's. On the first Sunday of each September, a large homecoming of descendants of the early Brushy Creek families is held at the arbor. A program, business meeting, and meal are part of the agenda, plus a guest speaker and recognition of families. the annual homecoming is a popular, well-attended event. Many descendants still live in the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25638/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25636/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25674/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25696/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25701/
[Anderson County Courthouse]
The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25718/
[Anderson County Farmers]
Photo of some farmer working in the fields somewhere in Anderson County. It is unknown who Mrs. Melba Wallace is or how she is connected to this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29352/
[Anderson County Jail - 704 Avenue A]
Photograph of the northeast corner of the Anderson County Jail building located at 704 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas, taken from N. Church Street. It is a three-story Art Deco-style brick building. A sign over the entrance says, "Anderson County Juvenile Center." There is a line of orange cones in the street in the foreground of the image, as well as several people: a man on a bicycle to the right and two women with a young girl walking around cones to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25689/
[Anderson County Pasture]
Photo of a pasture in Anderson County texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29384/
[Anderson County Tulips]
Beautiful tulips located at a home in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25667/
[The Arbor at the Anderson County Camp Ground - Brushy Creek]
This is a photo of the Arbor at the Anderson County Camp Ground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into the 1950's. On the first Sunday of each September, a large homecoming of descendants of the early Brushy Creek families is held at the arbor. A program, business meeting, and meal are part of the agenda, plus a guest speaker and recognition of families. the annual homecoming is a popular, well-attended event. Many descendants still live in the county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29216/
[Arnold Hudson and Unidentified Man]
Photo of an unidentified man and Arnold Hudson standing in front of some parked cars in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25742/
[Autumn Leaves on a Dogwood Tree in Anderson County]
An Anderson County dogwood tree during the fall in Davey Dogwood Park near Palestine, Texas. The tree's leaves have all turned red. Other trees are visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25712/
[Avenue A - Palestine]
Photo of Avenue A looking eastward toward the courthouse square. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25670/
[Avenue A - Palestine]
Photo of a snowy Avenue A, Palestine taken December 24, 1887 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29257/
[Avenue Baptist Church and Rev. A.D. Sparkman]
Photo collage including pictures of the Avenue Baptist Church and Reverend A.D. Sparkman. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25647/
[Barbershop Quartet]
Barbershop Quartet in Palestine Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25659/
[Ben Hassell with friends]
Photo of Ben Hassell with friends standing in front of an unidentified house in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29316/
[Best Service Station - Palestine]
Photograph of the Best Service Station - Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29261/
[Betty Flanagan and the Dogwoods at the Carnegie Building]
Betty Flanagan standing next to a Dogwood tree in front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25709/
[Big Bratton Drug Store]
Photo showing the interior of the Big Bratton Drug Store - man on left is Orin Cutter, man in hat is Dr. Bratton and first man on the right could possibly be Earl Butler. The rest are unidentified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29290/
[Bill Hall at the Inland Refinery]
Photo of Bill Hall at the Inland Refinery, which was located near Tucker Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29298/
[Bluebonnets and Azalias in Anderson County]
Photo of Bluebonnets and Azalias in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25666/
[Bluebonnets and Azalias in Anderson County]
Photo of Bluebonnets and Azalias in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25663/
[Bob Burroughs at Service Station]
Photo of Bob Burroughs filling up his car with gas in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25765/
[Bratton Drug Company]
Photo of the interior of the Bratton Drug Company, downtown Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25740/
[Bratton Drug Store - Corner of N. Sycamore and W. Oak Str]
Photo of the Bratton Drug Company, where it was located for many years at the corner of W. Oak and N. Sycamore streets in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25778/
[The Brownies of Palestine]
A Collage of prominent Palestine businessmen titled "The Brownies of Palestine" "Wish you a Happy New Year". Photos are identified left to right as: F. Hufsmith, D.J. Price, V.F. DuBose, J.W. Cuningham, N.R. Royal, W.M. Lacy, Henry Ash, A. Teah, G.A. Wright, W.P. Siddons, A.R. Howard and W.J. Taylor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25774/
[The Brownies of Palestine]
A Collage of prominent Palestine businessmen titled "The Brownies of Palestine" "Wish you a Happy New Year". Photos are identified left to right as: F. Hufsmith, D.J. Price, V.F. DuBose, J.W. Cuningham, N.R. Royal, W.M. Lacy, Henry Ash, A. Teah, G.A. Wright, W.P. Siddons, A.R. Howard and W.J. Taylor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25586/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25603/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25607/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25623/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25611/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25649/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25631/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25619/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25627/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25615/
[Building a Library]
Conversion of the Alamo School into the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25669/