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  Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anchor from the Steamboat Ruthven]

[Anchor from the Steamboat Ruthven]

Date: c. 1920
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a photo of the Anchor that was originally part of the steamboat Ruthven. The Ruthven was completed in the spring of 1860, though information concerning her home port and construction details are not clear. Before the civil war, the Ruthven seems to have been engaged in the Magnolia to Galveston trade carrying both goods and passengers. During the war she was chartered as a Confederate transport, hauling troops, military supplies, and the Confederate mails along with her usual cargos. As the war progressed and the Northern blockade of Galveston became more effective, the Trinity River trade tapered down to nearly nothing, suffering because of the inability to either ship cotton out or to receive goods on a regular basis. At the end of the war, however, this trend was reversed. Cotton and other agricultural produce once again flowed southward, and goods such as salt, flour, sugar, coffee, whiskey and clothing were brought north. At that time, shipment of cotton from Magnolia to Galveston cost from seven to ten dollars per bale. In Palestine, anyone expecting goods on a incoming steamboat would wait in town at "Steamboat Corner" until the steamboat blew its whistle as it came within a ...
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson Campground - Brushy Creek Arbor]

[Anderson Campground - Brushy Creek Arbor]

Date: c. 1980
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a photo of the Anderson County Campground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into ...
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1980~
Creator: unknown
Description: The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1991~
Creator: unknown
Description: The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1991~
Creator: unknown
Description: The Anderson County Courthouse is the largest historic institutional building in Palestine and arguably the most prominent architectural landmark. Sited atop a hill that overlooks the central business district to the southwest, the courthouse retains its historic integrity and character. The original architects, C.H. Page and Brother incorporated Classical Revival elements in the design, which bears a resemblance to the firm’s courthouse design for Williamson County, Texas. Legislators designated Palestine the county seat of Anderson County in 1846, the year of the county’s creation. This is the county’s fourth courthouse, and the third to be erected on this site. It was designed in 1913-1914 by the noted Austin architectural firm of Charles Page and Brother. B.P. Garvey of Gainesville, Texas, served as the contractor. The building’s formal dedication ceremony was held December 20, 1914. Billy Bean documented the courthouse in his 1980 survey. The building was extensively remodeled in 1986. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 - Building #92001256
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: 1980~
Creator: unknown
Description: Detail view of the architecture just south of the entrance on the west side of the Anderson County Courthouse, located at 500 N. Church in Palestine, Texas. The three-story building has Classical Revival-style elements including Ionic columns across the front. There is a dome topped with a statue of Lady Justice in the center of the roof.
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Courthouse]

[Anderson County Courthouse]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of a man wearing a suit, speaking into a microphone on the steps of the Anderson County Courthouse, located at 500 N. Church in Palestine, Texas. There are people seated on the steps and standing on the ground watching. Part of the building's Classical Revival-style architecture is visible in the upper part of the image.
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Farmers]

[Anderson County Farmers]

Date: c. 1900
Creator: unknown
Description: Photo of some farmer working in the fields somewhere in Anderson County. It is unknown who Mrs. Melba Wallace is or how she is connected to this picture.
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Jail - 704 Avenue A]

[Anderson County Jail - 704 Avenue A]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: Photograph of the northeast corner of the Anderson County Jail building located at 704 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas, taken from N. Church Street. It is a three-story Art Deco-style brick building. A sign over the entrance says, "Anderson County Juvenile Center." There is a line of orange cones in the street in the foreground of the image, as well as several people: a man on a bicycle to the right and two women with a young girl walking around cones to the left.
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
[Anderson County Pasture]

[Anderson County Pasture]

Date: c. 1950
Creator: unknown
Description: Photo of a pasture in Anderson County
Contributing Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission