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  Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission
 Decade: 1970-1979
[Dogwood Tree in front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree located in front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25630/
[Dogwood Tree in Front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25679/
[Dogwood Tree in Front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25646/
[Dogwood Tree in Front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25764/
[Dogwood Tree in front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry]
Photo of a blooming Dogwood tree in the front yard of the Howard House, which is located at 1011 N. Perry Street, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25731/
[Dogwood Trees in front of City Hall - Palestine]
Photo of the Dogwood located in front of City Hall, downtown Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25608/
[Dogwood Trees in front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of the Dogwood Trees in bloom located in the front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25604/
[Dogwood Trees in front of the Carnegie Building]
Blooming Dogwood trees in the yard of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25614/
[Dogwood Trees in front of the Howard House]
Photo of Dogwoods located in front of the Howard House - 1011 N. Perry Street - Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25612/
[Dogwoods around the Sacred Heart Catholic Church]
Photo of the dogwood trees blooming near the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, viewed from the northeast, on Queen Street in Palestine, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25653/
[Dogwoods in Bloom in Front of the Carnegie Building]
Photo of the Dogwoods blooming in the front yard of the Carnegie Building. This building housed the Palestine Public Library until 1985. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25639/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the First Methodist Church, which is located at 422 S. Magnolia, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29291/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the gardens of the First Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29294/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the side of the First Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29297/
[First Methodist Church - 422 S. Magnolia]
Photo of the garden walls at the First Methodist Church, located at 422 S. Magnolia, Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29305/
[The Front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine]
Photo of the front of the Carnegie Building in Palestine. This building once housed the Palestine Public Library. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25672/
[Gatewood Shelton Gin - Crawford Street]
Photograph of the Gatewood Shelton Gin when it housed an antique store. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29336/
[Highway Scene in Anderson County]
Photo of a county road in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25605/
[Hotel O'Neill - 313 Spring Street]
Palestine's O'Neill Hotel was located at 313 Spring Street but was actually the third hotel to sit on the site. In 1873, following the coming of the railroad to town, the Laclede Hotel was built there, but was destroyed by fire in 1876. The following year, a Dr. Manning of Oakwood erected a brick building known as the International Hotel on that location. It was purchased in 1882 by Col. George Burkitt who turned over operations to Mrs. Emma Nolen. During her tenure, the property was known as the Nolen Hotel, but when she moved to St. Louis, Col. Burkitt himself took over the management. That building was razed in 1922 and the "new" O'Neill, maiden surname of Burkitt's Irish born mother, was constructed on the site. The O'Neill boasted not only hot and cold running water in its guest rooms, it was also equipped with an electric Otis elevator and a radio receiving set on the mezzanine for entertainment of the hotel's guests. When Texas Gov. Ross Sterling declared martial law in the East Texas Oil Fields and ordered the National Guard to take it over and shut-in all wells, the O'Neill became the staging center where the command cadre spent its first night "in the field." During the oil boom, the hotel was a favorite meeting place for oil operators, lease hounds and geologists. Among the famous early day oil men who slept under its roof and conducted business out of its rooms were H.L. Hunt, Harold Byrd, Jack Frost and other wildcatters. Those were the "glory days" of the venerable hotel, but not the end. The hotel was sold a number of times, and despite halfhearted attempts to restore it, the condition of the building went downhill. It was demolished in August 1983 and the property is still vacant today. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29193/
[Jim Conaway's Grave in the Palestine City Cemetery Complex]
Headstone of Jim Conaway, who is buried in the East Hill section of the Palestine City Cemetery Complex. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25692/
[John H. Reagan Camp of Confederate Veterans]
Photo of a photo of the John H. Reagan Camp of the Confederate Veterans taken October 3, 1902. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25642/
[Kolstad's Jewelry Store - 100 W. Oak]
Photo of Kolstad's Jewelry Store. Established in 1853 by Soren Kolstad, it was once touted as the longest established Jewelry store in Texas. It closed for business in the early 1990's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25777/
[Looking East up Avenue A]
Looking east up Avenue A from a position near the front of the Presbyterian Church toward to the Anderson County Courthouse. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29184/
[Looking North along N. Sycamore Street]
Looking north along N. Sycamore Street. Notice the construction of what was the Royall National Bank Drive-Thru building on the right. This bank later became the Hibernia Bank, then Capitol One in 2006. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25628/
[The Old and the New Pilgrim Churches - Elkhart, Tx]
The Pilgrim Church, a Primitive Baptist institution, was organized in Crawford County, Illinois, by Daniel Parker, who led a caravan of twenty-five ox-drawn wagons to Texas in 1833 after securing permission to establish the church from Stephen F. Austin. This picture depicts the rebuilt replica of the original church and the new church, which is still in use today. The replica was dedicated sometime before 1962 and is the site of the annual Coffee and Gingerbread reception held each spring. The site is next to the Pilgrim Cemetery, which is located just outside of the rural community of Elkhart, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25776/
[The Old Pilgrim Church - Elkhart, Tx.]
The Pilgrim Church, a Primitive Baptist institution, was organized in Crawford County, Illinois, by Daniel Parker, who led a caravan of twenty-five ox-drawn wagons to Texas in 1833 after securing permission to establish the church from Stephen F. Austin. This picture depicts the rebuilt replica of the original church located beside the new church, which is still in use today. The replica was dedicated sometime before 1962 and is the site of the annual Coffee and Gingerbread reception held each spring. The site is next to the Pilgrim Cemetery, which is located just outside of the rural community of Elkhart, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25802/
[Osjetea Briggs Home - Rusk Highway]
Photograph of the home of Osjetea Briggs, which was located just out of the city limits on the highway going toward Rusk. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29173/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25577/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25585/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25581/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25704/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25722/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25744/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25700/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25748/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25708/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25730/
[A Parade in Palestine]
A parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25726/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25752/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of an unknown parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25735/
[A Parade in Palestine]
Photo of a parade in Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25713/
[Pear Trees in Anderson County]
View of a fruit laden pear tree in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25609/
[Photo of a Crypt in the Palestine City Cemetery Complex]
Photo of a crypt in the East Hill section of the Palestine City Cemetery Complex. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25685/
[Photo of a monument at the Palestine City Cemetery Complex]
Photo of a marker in the East Hill section of the Palestine City Cemetery complex. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25678/
[Photo of a Painting of Confederate Soldiers]
Photo of a painting done by an unknown artist of confederate troops in battle during the civil war. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25601/
[Pilgrim Predestinarian Church]
Photo of the "new" Pilgrim Predestinarian Church, which is located outside of Elkhart Texas, in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29313/
[Pilgrim Predestinarian Church]
Photo of the "new" Pilgrim Predestinarian Church, which is located outside of Elkhart Texas, in Anderson County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29289/
[Reagan School - 400 S. Michaux]
The old Reagan School is a premier example of Tudor Revival style and is among the city’s most outstanding architectural landmarks. In July 1915 Palestinians voted for a $100,000 bond issue to cover construction costs for this building, which replaced an earlier high school in the city’s business district. Prominent Fort Worth architects Marshall R. Sanguinet and Carl Gordon Staats designed the building, while A.W. Flynt, also of Fort Worth, served as general contractor. Completed in the spring of 1916, the new school was designed for an enrollment of 300 students. From 1939 through 1966 the building served as the city’s junior high school. It was officially renamed the John H. Reagan Junior High School in 1955. From 1966 until 1976 the building housed elementary grades. After that time it was abandoned and stood vacant for several years. In 1981 a local preservation group rehabilitated the school and converted it into a museum. It remains the “Museum for East Texas Culture” today. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29189/
[Rev. Bert Bagley - First Methodist Church]
Photo of Rev. Bert Bagley, pastor of the First Methodist Church - Palestine. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29301/
[Sacred Heart Catholic Church - 503 N. Queen]
Photograph of the front and west side of Sacred Heart Catholic Church, located at 503 N. Queen in Palestine, Texas, viewed from Oak Street. The handmade brick building has a square tower on the southeast corner and features many Gothic arch-style windows. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29186/