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  Partner: Arlington Public Library
 Decade: 1990-1999
 Language: English
[APD badges and decorations]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of an Arlington police badge centered and surrounded by decorations. The caption reads "Clockwise from top in order of precedence: Medal of Honor; Medal of Valor; Wounded in Action; Distinguished Service; Police Officer's Award; Medal of Merit; Supervisor of the Year; Officer of the Year; Service to Youth; Community Service; Life Saving; Rookie of the Year; Reserve Office of the Year; Service Award; Safe Driving." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176446/
[APD badges, current versions, view 1]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of the current versions of the Arlington police badges. Showing are: Chief, Sergeant, Deputy Chief, Officer, Lieutenant, Chaplain, and Captain. Use of these badges started in the late 1970s, early 1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176441/
[APD badges, current versions, view 2]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of the current versions of the Arlington police badges. Showing are: Chief, Sergeant, Deputy Chief, Officer, Lieutenant, Chaplain, and Captain. Use of these badges started in the late 1970s, early 1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176498/
[APD badges, earlier versions, 1st close view]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book 1994 of the first Arlington police badges. Five badges are shown, including Captain, Chaplain and Sergeant badges. The badge in the center is pre-1950. The other badges were used up until the late 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176440/
[APD badges, earlier versions, 2nd view]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book 1994 of the first Arlington police badges. Five badges are shown, including Captain, Chaplain and Sergeant badges. The badge in the center is pre-1950. The other badges were used up until the late 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176497/
[APD Honor Guard, ca. 1995]
Photograph of the Honor Guard (15 officers) in uniform about 1995 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). All are standing in two rows with five officers on the back row holding rifles. Portions of the name of the building show behind the legs of the officers on the front row. The Honor Guard contains three separate sections: Color Guard, Shooting (or Firing) Party, and an Honors Party. The Honor Guard participates in parades, dedication ceremonies, and other official events and represents the city as goodwill ambassadors across the state. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176328/
[APD. "Lock and unload!" campaign picture]
Photograph of Texas Ranger baseball player Will Clark holding a shot gun and police officer Austin Barrett holding a hand gun for the Firearms Injury Prevention campaign. The slogan "Lock and unload!" is added to the picture. National Fire Protection Association logo Risk Watch is in the bottom left corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176339/
[APD Millennium badge and Mobile Command Post "MC-1" bus]
Photograph of the APD Millennium badge and a photograph of the "MC-1" Mobile Command Post bus. The gold Millennium badge is imprinted with the words "Arlington," "Police," "1884-2000," "Texas" (printed inside a white baseball), a bronze colored front view of the Texas Rangers Stadium, and the word "Officer." The badge was worn from November 1999 until January 1, 2000. The MC-1 Mobile Command Post is a white bus with wavy red, black, and blue stripes on the side bottom. It serves as a temporary station. Across the side top of the bus is the Arlington Police patch emblem and the words "Arlington Police Department." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176453/
[APD "Missing" flyer for Amber Haggerman, 1996]
Photograph of the police flyer posted for the abduction of Amber Haggerman of Arlington in January of 1996. Her story led to the AMBER Alert system. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176326/
[APD. New 1993 Arlington police cruiser]
Photograph of a new 1993 Chevrolet Arlington police cruiser parked in front of the Ott Cribbs Station at 620 West Division Street. The driver side door shows the Arlington City emblem with "Arlington Police" beside it. The small rear window has "806" underneath it. "Call 9-1-1 Emergency" is inside a circle which is placed next to the rear tail light and bumper. The roof has the red, white, and blue flashing lights attached. A push bumper is mounted on the front. 'Law and Order Magazine 1993' gave this cruiser third place in its Design Contest for its "very simple, clean design which looks good both day and night." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176437/
[APD Special Operations in training]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 (Vol. II) showing the Special Operations Unit in training. The word "Training" is in the upper left corner. Showing are five pictures with captions: Dolores Chavez demonstrating the "Spider Crawl" ; P.J. Brock learning to tie the "Swiss Seat" ; Sgt. Walt West instructs Johnny Spruiel (Sgt. Paul Richards, Sgt. Walt West, Johnny Spruiel, J.T. Boyd) ; Rudy Salazar, rapel instructor ; Lt. Roy Mitchell "needing a little help" with the rope bridge. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176502/
[APD Special Operations training. "School" page]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 (Vol. II) showing the Special Operations Unit in training. The word "School" is in the upper left corner. Showing are four pictures with captions: Mark Funderburk preparing to rapel ; Helicopter rapelling ; "The Exterminators" (Greg Borders, Sgt. Walt West, Danny Nutt and James McSpadden) ; "We always knew Craig was hard-headed" (Craig Taylor, Tony Monlina, Steve Dollar, and Doug Cooper) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176501/
[APD trading cards (4 horizontal prints), 1994]
Photograph of four Arlington Police trading cards. The black cards have horizontal color shots of personnel in the middle. The name on each card is labeled in white at the bottom. They are: Traffic Supervisors; Bike Patrol, Pam Gold and John McGrath; Accident Investigators; School Resource Officers. Printing on the left side of the card says "Premier Edition 1994" in yellow and on the right side "Photos by Studio Works" in white. At the top of each card is the Arlington Police Shield and printed in white "Arlington Police." These cards were given out in schools, the stadium and various places for kids to collect. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176450/
[APD training the recruit class, 1999]
Photograph of two Arlington Police vehicles stopped abreast on a back road with the drivers leaning out the doors, hand guns pointed at a female suspect. The suspect is standing with her hands placed on her head. A group of people are standing behind, between, and to the side of the police vehicles. At least three of the people in the picture are wearing police uniforms. The others are in street attire or their apparel is not clearly pictured. Three civilian vehicles are parked on the grass behind the police vehicles. The fire training center is shown in the background (two red brick buildings, a white building and a ramp). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176349/
[APD "Use your head...Protect it!" campaign picture]
Photograph of Texas Rangers player Rusty Greer, bike patrol officer Russ Greene, a firefighter, a teenager on inline skates and a young girl with a bicycle (pedestrian safety) inside Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. The slogan "Use your head...Protect it!" is added to the picture. National Fire Protection Association logo Risk Watch is in the bottom right corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176338/
[APD's first female officers (20 years later) in 1997]
Photograph of some of the first female police officers in Arlington taken twenty years later in 1997. Front row: Martha Bacile Findlay, Martha Willbanks (center in dark blue uniform), Patt Scheckel-Hollingsworth. Back row: Shirley Bryant, Dixie Stout Bersano, and Sandy Walthall Jay (in uniform). Lt. Martha Willbanks (center) was the first female APD Police Officer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176352/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott comforting Ernestine Henderson, newspaper clipping, 1991]
Photograph of Police Chaplain Harold Elliott comforting Ernestine Henderson, the mother of a drowning victim at Lake Arlington, when he told her that her son's body had been found. It was taken by Allen Rose from the Fort Worth Star Telegram, July 12, 1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176365/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott holding a photograph taken at the bombed Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (newspaper clipping, 1996)]
Photograph of Chaplain Harold Elliott holding a large color photograph that shows him walking past the bombed Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The bomb completely demolished one side of the building and was the worst terrorist attack at the time on U.S. soil. Chaplain Elliott was called to the city to assist as a chaplain to the other chaplains and later, to councel state, federal and local rescue and recovery workers. The caption of the clipping from the Fort Worth Star Telegram reads "Helping Hand. Police Department's chaplain serves many roles." The hand written date on the article is 8/96 but the bombing occured April 19, 1995. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176400/
[Arlington Police Department all divisions group photo, ca. 1999]
Photograph of eleven people who represent each department of the Arlington Police Department. The picture was taken at the back door employee entrance of the "Ott" Cribbs Public Safety Center on Division Street. On the left is motocycle parking and on the right is the jail entrance. Some of those included are representatives from the Motorcycle Division, Bike Patrol, Honor Guard, Special Operations, Canine (K-9) Unit, Warrant Division, Crime Scene Search Unit, and Public Service Assistant. Standing in the rear is Police Chief Theron Bowman. Also in the photograph are a police car, police motorcycle, bicycle and police dog. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176385/
[Arlington Police Deputy Chief A.J. Key]
Photograph of Deputy Chief A.J. Key in uniform shaking hands with someone out of the picture. He served with the Arlington Police Department for about 22 years between the years 1977 through 1999. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176514/
[Arlington Police Museum. Newspaper picture of Russian police officer Col. Galija Mavljutov touring the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping with a photograph taken by Brad Loper from the Arlington Morning News of Russian police officer Col. Galija Mavljutov touring the Arlington police museum after she attended the International Association of Women Police conference in Dallas. The caption at the top of the picture says "Policewomen join forces." The picture also shows various artifacts on display at the museum including three mannequins wearing uniforms and a United States Flag. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176496/
[Arlington Police Museum. Newspaper picture of Russian police officer Oleg Orjekhouski touring the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping with a photograph taken by Carolyn Bauman from the Fort Worth Star Telegram April 23, 1992 of Moscow police officer Oleg Orjekhouski. The caption beneath the picture says "Moscow police officer Oleg Orjekhouski looks at one of the displays at the Arlington Police Museum." The display is of a mannequin wearing a motorcycle police uniform. A United States Flag is in the background. Officer Orjekhouski is wearing his uniform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176436/
[Arlington Police Officer Craig M. Hanking, portrait]
Photograph of Officer Craig Michael Hanking in full dark blue uniform. Officer Hanking was killed in the line of duty in an automobile accident on August 3, 1994 while responding to a burglary call. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176331/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, street renaming ceremony]
Photograph of a group gathered outside of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center for the dedication of a street that has been renamed in memory of Officer James Johnson. Three people, a police officer and two women, are holding a new street sign: "James Johnson St 200" (block). The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176431/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, street sign]
Photograph of a group of people looking at a renamed street sign, "James Johnson St 200" (block) which has been installed on the sign post with "W Division" street sign. The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176433/
[Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's name being "rubbed" from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.]
Photograph of a person making a rubbing of Officer Jerry Crocker's name that is engraved on the wall of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington D.C. The memorial honors federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the safety and protection of the nation and its people. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176495/
[Arlington Police Officer Terry Lewis's casket carried by the Honor Guard during his funeral, newspaper clipping, 1992]
Photograph of Arlington Police Honor Guard carrying Officer Terry Lewis's casket during his funeral. Officer Lewis was killed in the line of duty by vehicular assault on October 9, 1992. It was taken by Gregg Ellman October 13, 1992 for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176368/
[Arlington Police Officers Gary D. Harl and Terry L. Lewis, street signs]
Photograph of two street signs on a stop sign post that were placed in memory of police officers Gary Harl and Terry Lewis. The picture of the sign post is angled to show clearly the renamed streets: "Gary Harl St 500" (block) and "Terry Lewis St 200" (block). The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176432/
[Arlington Volunteer Police Chaplain Ronnie Armstrong, Sr. obituary]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper obituary of Arlington Volunteer Police Chaplain Ronnie Armstrong, Sr. who died in 1996. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176451/
["From Joining to Shipping Out"]
Document relating Jack Vaughan's time in the Marines Corps during World War II, from joining to shipping out. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth379927/
[Image of a case displaying the book "Mail Order Murder", a case solved by Detectives Tom LeNoir and Buddy Evans]
Photograph of a case displaying a paperback book "Mail Order Murder" written by Patricia Springer about the case solved by Detectives Tom LeNoir and Buddy Evans. To the left of the book, a two-sided folding frame holds their photos and names. To the right of the book, a framed placard states: Book about murder cases solved by Detectives Tom LeNoir and Buddy Evans 1994. Additional comments, not in the image, follow: "The book is the story of a case they solved called, MAIL ORDER MURDER. The suspect was convicted for the murder of only one of several wives he killed. He acquired his brides through mail order romance magazines. Arlington Police became involved in 1994. A jury convicted Jack Reeves in 1996 and sentenced him to 99 years in prison." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176206/
[Image of a display honoring Arlington Police Officer Craig Hanking]
Photograph of a display of various objects belonging to and honoring Officer Craig M. Hanking who was killed in the line of duty in an automobile accident on August 3, 1994 while responding to a burglary call. Shown is Officer Hanking's black wallet containing his business card on the left and his ID badge #1443 on the right. His wrist watch sits below the wallet. At the top of the wallet is a bronze horse statue called a "caparisoned horse". The single riderless horse carries boots reversed in the stirrups in a military funeral. By tradition in military funeral honors, a caparisoned horse follows the casket of the deceased indicating that the warrior will ride no more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176242/
[Image of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial in Austin, Texas, side view]
Photograph of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial. The Texas Peace Officers' Memorial is a monument erected on the grounds of the Capitol Complex in Austin, Texas to recognize and honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Texas law enforcement and corrections officers who were killed in the line of duty. On May 10, 1999, law enforcement officers and the families of officers traveled to Austin for the Memorial dedication. This replica is on a wooden base with the words "Texas Peace Officers Memorial" printed on a bronze plate attached to the center of the base. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176235/
[Image of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial in Austin, Texas, top view]
Photograph of a replica of the Texas Peace Officers' Memorial. The Texas Peace Officers' Memorial is a monument erected on the grounds of the Capitol Complex in Austin, Texas to recognize and honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Texas law enforcement and corrections officers who were killed in the line of duty. On May 10, 1999, law enforcement officers and the families of officers traveled to Austin for the Memorial dedication. This replica is on a wooden base with the words "Texas Peace Officers Memorial" printed on a bronze plate attached to the center of the base. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176236/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's pistol, view 1]
Photograph of the pistol carried by Reserve Officer Jerry J. Crocker the night he died in the line of duty October 9, 1992. Officer Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis were killed when their patrol car was struck broadside by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. This image shows the pistol with Officer Crocker's name plate above it and a brief description of the event below it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176246/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's pistol, view 2]
Photograph of the pistol carried by Reserve Officer Jerry J. Crocker the night he died in the line of duty October 9, 1992. Officer Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis were killed when their patrol car was struck broadside by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. This image shows the pistol with Officer Crocker's name plate above it and a brief description of the event below it. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176248/
[Image of Arlington Police Officer Terry L. Lewis's pistol]
Photograph of the pistol carried by Officer Terry L. Lewis the night he died in the line of duty October 9, 1992. Officer Terry Lewis and Officer Jerry Crocker were killed when their patrol car was struck broadside by a drunk driver driving a tractor trailer. This image shows the pistol with a brief description of the event placed above the pistol. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176247/
[Image of Detective James McSpadden's Investigative Review notebook on the Amber Hagerman Homicide, view 1]
Photograph of Amber Hagerman Homicide Investigative Review note book kept by Detective James McSpadden. The notebook is lying on blue fabric. Additional comments: Amber’s death in 1996 led to President George W. Bush signing the AMBER Alert into law in 2003. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176212/
[Image of Detective James McSpadden's Investigative Review notebook on the Amber Hagerman Homicide, view 2]
Photograph of Amber Hagerman Homicide Investigative Review note book kept by Detective James McSpadden. The notebook is lying on blue fabric. Additional comments: Amber’s death in 1996 led to President George W. Bush signing the AMBER Alert into law in 2003. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176222/
[Image of the APD Millennium badge]
Photograph of the APD Millennium badge. The gold Millennium badge is imprinted with the words "Arlington," "Police," "1884-2000," "Texas" (printed inside a white baseball), a bronze colored front view of the Texas Rangers Stadium, and the word "Officer." The badge was worn from November 1999 until January 1, 2000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176288/
[Newspaper article about the street dedications for fallen Arlington police officers, part 1]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article written by Jessamy Brown. The article is about the street naming dedications for Arlington police officers James Johnson, Gary Harl, Jerry Crocker, and Terry Lewis who died in the line of duty. It includes brief statements from family members of the slain officers. There are three pictures in the article. The largest is of Luther Johnson with a photo of his brother Officer James Johnson who died in 1930. Two other smaller pictures are photos of Officer Jerry Crocker and Officer Terry Lewis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176434/
[Newspaper article about the street dedications for fallen Arlington police officers, part 2]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper article written by Jessamy Brown. The article is about the street naming dedications for Arlington police officers James Johnson, Gary Harl, Jerry Crocker, and Terry Lewis who died in the line of duty. It includes brief statements from family members of the slain officers. It shows a map of the street locations. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176435/
[Recollections of Honolulu, Hawaii]
Document written by Jack Vaughan recollecting his time spent in Honolulu, Hawaii during March and April of 1944. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth379907/
[Recollections of Jack Vaughan]
Recollections written by Jack Vaughan concerning his service in the military in American Samoa during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth379779/
[Recollections of Klamath Falls]
Recollections by Jack Vaughan about his time spent in Klamath Falls, Oregon, recovering from a disease he had contracted in American Samoa. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth379920/
[Recollections of Yerba Buena Island]
Document of Jack Vaughan's recollections of his time spent at the detention barracks on Yerba Buena Island in San Francisco, California, from July 1945 to April 1946. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth379921/