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  Partner: Arlington Public Library
 Decade: 1990-1999
[APD badges and decorations]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of an Arlington police badge centered and surrounded by decorations. The caption reads "Clockwise from top in order of precedence: Medal of Honor; Medal of Valor; Wounded in Action; Distinguished Service; Police Officer's Award; Medal of Merit; Supervisor of the Year; Officer of the Year; Service to Youth; Community Service; Life Saving; Rookie of the Year; Reserve Office of the Year; Service Award; Safe Driving." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176446/
[APD badges, current versions, view 1]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of the current versions of the Arlington police badges. Showing are: Chief, Sergeant, Deputy Chief, Officer, Lieutenant, Chaplain, and Captain. Use of these badges started in the late 1970s, early 1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176441/
[APD badges, current versions, view 2]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 of the current versions of the Arlington police badges. Showing are: Chief, Sergeant, Deputy Chief, Officer, Lieutenant, Chaplain, and Captain. Use of these badges started in the late 1970s, early 1980s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176498/
[APD badges, earlier versions, 1st close view]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book 1994 of the first Arlington police badges. Five badges are shown, including Captain, Chaplain and Sergeant badges. The badge in the center is pre-1950. The other badges were used up until the late 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176440/
[APD badges, earlier versions, 2nd view]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book 1994 of the first Arlington police badges. Five badges are shown, including Captain, Chaplain and Sergeant badges. The badge in the center is pre-1950. The other badges were used up until the late 1970s. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176497/
[APD Color Guard, ca. 1992]
Photograph of five members of the Color Guard (in uniform) taken about 1992 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). The Color Guard section of the Honor Guard carry the National, State, and City flags during events. L to R are Billy Russell, Steve Hall, Lonny Wright, Bob Gonzales and Henry Hernandez. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176414/
[APD Honor Guard, ca. 1992]
Photograph of the Honor Guard (17 officers) in uniform about 1992 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). All are standing in three rows with five officers on the front row holding rifles. The National, State and City flags are centered behind them. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176413/
[APD Honor Guard, ca. 1995]
Photograph of the Honor Guard (15 officers) in uniform about 1995 in front of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center (Main station). All are standing in two rows with five officers on the back row holding rifles. Portions of the name of the building show behind the legs of the officers on the front row. The Honor Guard contains three separate sections: Color Guard, Shooting (or Firing) Party, and an Honors Party. The Honor Guard participates in parades, dedication ceremonies, and other official events and represents the city as goodwill ambassadors across the state. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176328/
[APD Honor Guard Rifle team at a memorial service]
Photograph of the seven member Honor Guard Rifle team (Shooting Party) standing at attention with their rifles at their side, barrel touching the ground. They form a line standing in the cemetery at Moore Memorial Gardens. Two other officers are standing nearby and two police cars are in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176469/
[APD. "Lock and unload!" campaign picture]
Photograph of Texas Ranger baseball player Will Clark holding a shot gun and police officer Austin Barrett holding a hand gun for the Firearms Injury Prevention campaign. The slogan "Lock and unload!" is added to the picture. National Fire Protection Association logo Risk Watch is in the bottom left corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176339/
[APD Millennium badge and Mobile Command Post "MC-1" bus]
Photograph of the APD Millennium badge and a photograph of the "MC-1" Mobile Command Post bus. The gold Millennium badge is imprinted with the words "Arlington," "Police," "1884-2000," "Texas" (printed inside a white baseball), a bronze colored front view of the Texas Rangers Stadium, and the word "Officer." The badge was worn from November 1999 until January 1, 2000. The MC-1 Mobile Command Post is a white bus with wavy red, black, and blue stripes on the side bottom. It serves as a temporary station. Across the side top of the bus is the Arlington Police patch emblem and the words "Arlington Police Department." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176453/
[APD "Missing" flyer for Amber Haggerman, 1996]
Photograph of the police flyer posted for the abduction of Amber Haggerman of Arlington in January of 1996. Her story led to the AMBER Alert system. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176326/
[APD. New 1993 Arlington police cruiser]
Photograph of a new 1993 Chevrolet Arlington police cruiser parked in front of the Ott Cribbs Station at 620 West Division Street. The driver side door shows the Arlington City emblem with "Arlington Police" beside it. The small rear window has "806" underneath it. "Call 9-1-1 Emergency" is inside a circle which is placed next to the rear tail light and bumper. The roof has the red, white, and blue flashing lights attached. A push bumper is mounted on the front. 'Law and Order Magazine 1993' gave this cruiser third place in its Design Contest for its "very simple, clean design which looks good both day and night." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176437/
[APD retirees with Arlington Police Chief David Kunkle, 1992]
Photograph of APD retirees taken in 1992 at a retirement ceremony. Bottom row L to R: Homer DeWolfe (retired 1987), Jerry McCurry (retired 1992), Bob Easley (served 1956-1982). Top row L to R: Bill Wills (retired 1991), Bobby Wiggins (served 1959-1984), James Long (in uniform) (served 1954-1992), Ed Watson (retired 1989), Chief David Kunkle (in uniform), Boyce Megason (retired 1990). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176364/
[APD Special Operations in training]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 (Vol. II) showing the Special Operations Unit in training. The word "Training" is in the upper left corner. Showing are five pictures with captions: Dolores Chavez demonstrating the "Spider Crawl" ; P.J. Brock learning to tie the "Swiss Seat" ; Sgt. Walt West instructs Johnny Spruiel (Sgt. Paul Richards, Sgt. Walt West, Johnny Spruiel, J.T. Boyd) ; Rudy Salazar, rapel instructor ; Lt. Roy Mitchell "needing a little help" with the rope bridge. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176502/
[APD Special Operations training. "School" page]
Photograph of a page taken from the Arlington Police Department Commemorative Book, 1994 (Vol. II) showing the Special Operations Unit in training. The word "School" is in the upper left corner. Showing are four pictures with captions: Mark Funderburk preparing to rapel ; Helicopter rapelling ; "The Exterminators" (Greg Borders, Sgt. Walt West, Danny Nutt and James McSpadden) ; "We always knew Craig was hard-headed" (Craig Taylor, Tony Monlina, Steve Dollar, and Doug Cooper) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176501/
[APD trading cards (4 horizontal prints), 1994]
Photograph of four Arlington Police trading cards. The black cards have horizontal color shots of personnel in the middle. The name on each card is labeled in white at the bottom. They are: Traffic Supervisors; Bike Patrol, Pam Gold and John McGrath; Accident Investigators; School Resource Officers. Printing on the left side of the card says "Premier Edition 1994" in yellow and on the right side "Photos by Studio Works" in white. At the top of each card is the Arlington Police Shield and printed in white "Arlington Police." These cards were given out in schools, the stadium and various places for kids to collect. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176450/
[APD training the recruit class, 1999]
Photograph of two Arlington Police vehicles stopped abreast on a back road with the drivers leaning out the doors, hand guns pointed at a female suspect. The suspect is standing with her hands placed on her head. A group of people are standing behind, between, and to the side of the police vehicles. At least three of the people in the picture are wearing police uniforms. The others are in street attire or their apparel is not clearly pictured. Three civilian vehicles are parked on the grass behind the police vehicles. The fire training center is shown in the background (two red brick buildings, a white building and a ramp). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176349/
[APD "Use your head...Protect it!" campaign picture]
Photograph of Texas Rangers player Rusty Greer, bike patrol officer Russ Greene, a firefighter, a teenager on inline skates and a young girl with a bicycle (pedestrian safety) inside Rangers Ballpark in Arlington. The slogan "Use your head...Protect it!" is added to the picture. National Fire Protection Association logo Risk Watch is in the bottom right corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176338/
[APD's first female officers (20 years later) in 1997]
Photograph of some of the first female police officers in Arlington taken twenty years later in 1997. Front row: Martha Bacile Findlay, Martha Willbanks (center in dark blue uniform), Patt Scheckel-Hollingsworth. Back row: Shirley Bryant, Dixie Stout Bersano, and Sandy Walthall Jay (in uniform). Lt. Martha Willbanks (center) was the first female APD Police Officer. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176352/
[APD's first legal advisor, Robert Diaz, portrait ca. 1995]
Photograph of a head and shoulders shot of Robert (Bob) Diaz who was the first legal advisor of the Arlington Police Department. He is wearing a dark suit with a red tie. He served as police legal advisor for the City of Arlington from 1974 until 1997. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176500/
[Arlington patrol car belonging to Officers Lewis and Crocker on display for MADD, 1992, back side view]
Photograph of the wrecked police car that Officer Terry J. Lewis and Officer Jerry L. Crocker were driving when they were hit by a drunk driver in 1992. The wrecked vehicle was on display by the MADD Organization to discourage drunk driving. The vehicle is sitting on a trailer. Several people are gathered around to view the car. The photograph shows the back side view of the wrecked vehicle. The photograph was taken outdoors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176388/
[Arlington patrol car belonging to Officers Lewis and Crocker on display for MADD, 1992, back view]
Photograph of the wrecked police car that Officer Terry J. Lewis and Officer Jerry L. Crocker were driving when they were hit by a drunk driver in 1992. The wrecked vehicle was on display by the MADD Organization to discourage drunk driving. The vehicle is sitting on a trailer. Several people are gathered around to view the car. The photograph shows the back view of the wrecked vehicle. The photographs was taken outdoors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176387/
[Arlington patrol car belonging to Officers Lewis and Crocker on display for MADD, 1992, driver side view]
Photograph of the wrecked police car that Officer Terry J. Lewis and Officer Jerry L. Crocker were driving when they were hit by a drunk driver in 1992. The wrecked vehicle was on display by the MADD Organization to discourage drunk driving. The vehicle was sitting on a trailer with large red letters displaying the word MADD. Several people are gathered around to view the car. The photograph shows the driver side view of the wrecked vehicle. The photographs was taken outdoors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176411/
[Arlington patrol car belonging to Officers Lewis and Crocker on display for MADD, 1992, passenger side view]
Photograph of the wrecked police car that Officer Terry J. Lewis and Officer Jerry L. Crocker were driving when they were hit by a drunk driver in 1992. The wrecked vehicle was on display by the MADD Organization to discourage drunk driving. The vehicle is sitting on a trailer. Several people are gathered around to read the information and view the car. The photograph shows the passenger side view of the wrecked vehicle. The photograph was taken outdoors. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176410/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott comforting Ernestine Henderson, newspaper clipping, 1991]
Photograph of Police Chaplain Harold Elliott comforting Ernestine Henderson, the mother of a drowning victim at Lake Arlington, when he told her that her son's body had been found. It was taken by Allen Rose from the Fort Worth Star Telegram, July 12, 1991. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176365/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott holding a photograph taken at the bombed Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (newspaper clipping, 1996)]
Photograph of Chaplain Harold Elliott holding a large color photograph that shows him walking past the bombed Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The bomb completely demolished one side of the building and was the worst terrorist attack at the time on U.S. soil. Chaplain Elliott was called to the city to assist as a chaplain to the other chaplains and later, to councel state, federal and local rescue and recovery workers. The caption of the clipping from the Fort Worth Star Telegram reads "Helping Hand. Police Department's chaplain serves many roles." The hand written date on the article is 8/96 but the bombing occured April 19, 1995. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176400/
[Arlington Police Chaplain Harold Elliott's annual New Year's Day Police Breakfast]
Photograph of Arlington policemen and families gathered at a dining table in the home of Chaplain Harold Elliott for the annual New Year's Day Police Breakfast that began in 1984. Chaplain Elliott is standing on the right in a red plaid shirt talking to a young girl. A light colored table cloth covers the table and a large pink flower arrangement sits in the middle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176397/
[Arlington Police Chief David Kunkle, portrait, b&w]
Photograph of Police Chief David M. Kunkle in suit and tie. Police Chief Kunkle served as Arlington Chief of Police from January 14, 1985 to 1999. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176512/
[Arlington Police Chief David Kunkle, portrait, color]
Photograph of a formal portrait of Police Chief David M. Kunkle in suit and tie. Police Chief Kunkle served as Chief of Police from January 14, 1985 to 1999. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176406/
[Arlington Police Chief David Kunkle with Fort Worth Police Chief Tom Windham at a Fort Worth memorial service]
Photograph of several policemen and an unidentified woman sitting in folding chairs at a Fort Worth memorial service. Police Chief David Kunkle is second from left on the front row and beside Chief Kunkle is Fort Worth Police Chief Thomas R. Windham. Most of them are reading a program from the service. Several people appear to be standing behind them in the crowd. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176403/
[Arlington Police Chiefs Roy Ables, David Kunkle, Herman Perry and Theron Bowman, 1999]
Photograph of the current and three previous police chiefs taken at an office retirement party. From left to right, they are Roy Ables (chief from 1983-1985), David Kunkle (chief from 1985-1999), Herman Perry (chief from 1971-1983) and Theron Bowman (chief from 1999-present). All the men are dressed in suits. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176347/
[Arlington Police Department all divisions group photo, ca. 1999]
Photograph of eleven people who represent each department of the Arlington Police Department. The picture was taken at the back door employee entrance of the "Ott" Cribbs Public Safety Center on Division Street. On the left is motocycle parking and on the right is the jail entrance. Some of those included are representatives from the Motorcycle Division, Bike Patrol, Honor Guard, Special Operations, Canine (K-9) Unit, Warrant Division, Crime Scene Search Unit, and Public Service Assistant. Standing in the rear is Police Chief Theron Bowman. Also in the photograph are a police car, police motorcycle, bicycle and police dog. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176385/
[Arlington Police Deputy Chief A.J. Key]
Photograph of Deputy Chief A.J. Key in uniform shaking hands with someone out of the picture. He served with the Arlington Police Department for about 22 years between the years 1977 through 1999. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176514/
[Arlington Police Detective Ann Thompson's drawing of a child]
Photograph of a drawing done by Arlington Police Detective Ann Thompson that depicts a young boy putting on his parent's police hat and shoes. The boy is wearing a stripped shirt, shorts, and one mid thigh sock. He is seated on a flat surface with the police hat on his head and is attempting to tie a shoe on his left foot with his leg folded up and the knee against his chest. The other shoe is on it's side next to the shoe he is tying on and the other sock is lying under his left leg. The drawing appears to have been done in black pencil. The drawing was given to Police Chief Theron Bowman and the image was later used on office birthday cards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176348/
[Arlington Police Museum. Newspaper picture of Russian police officer Col. Galija Mavljutov touring the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping with a photograph taken by Brad Loper from the Arlington Morning News of Russian police officer Col. Galija Mavljutov touring the Arlington police museum after she attended the International Association of Women Police conference in Dallas. The caption at the top of the picture says "Policewomen join forces." The picture also shows various artifacts on display at the museum including three mannequins wearing uniforms and a United States Flag. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176496/
[Arlington Police Museum. Newspaper picture of Russian police officer Oleg Orjekhouski touring the Harold K. Elliott Police Museum in Arlington]
Photograph of a newspaper clipping with a photograph taken by Carolyn Bauman from the Fort Worth Star Telegram April 23, 1992 of Moscow police officer Oleg Orjekhouski. The caption beneath the picture says "Moscow police officer Oleg Orjekhouski looks at one of the displays at the Arlington Police Museum." The display is of a mannequin wearing a motorcycle police uniform. A United States Flag is in the background. Officer Orjekhouski is wearing his uniform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176436/
[Arlington Police Officer Chip Oxendine with his parents]
Photograph of Police Officer Chip Oxendine talking to his parents at the dedication of the East Arlington Police Station on New York Avenue in 1996. His step-father, U.S. Representative Richard "Dick" Armey and his mother, Susan, had attended the ceremony. They are standing beside the windows inside the building and a City of Arlington flag appears to be flying outside. Officer Oxendine is in dark blue uniform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176383/
[Arlington Police Officer Craig M. Hanking, portrait]
Photograph of Officer Craig Michael Hanking in full dark blue uniform. Officer Hanking was killed in the line of duty in an automobile accident on August 3, 1994 while responding to a burglary call. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176331/
[Arlington Police Officer Dee Anderson speaking in city council chamber room]
Photograph of Arlington Police Officer Dee Anderson standing at a podium speaking to an audience in the City Council Chamber room. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176409/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, street renaming ceremony]
Photograph of a group gathered outside of the Ott Cribbs Public Safety Center for the dedication of a street that has been renamed in memory of Officer James Johnson. Three people, a police officer and two women, are holding a new street sign: "James Johnson St 200" (block). The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176431/
[Arlington Police Officer James Evans Johnson, street sign]
Photograph of a group of people looking at a renamed street sign, "James Johnson St 200" (block) which has been installed on the sign post with "W Division" street sign. The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176433/
[Arlington Police Officer Jerry J. Crocker's name being "rubbed" from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.]
Photograph of a person making a rubbing of Officer Jerry Crocker's name that is engraved on the wall of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington D.C. The memorial honors federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the safety and protection of the nation and its people. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176495/
[Arlington Police Officer Martha Willbanks, APD's first female officer]
Photograph of Officer Martha Willbanks standing with her arm on the driver's door of an Arlington Police cruiser. This is a close-in photo of Officer Willbanks taken in about 1999 with the background of the building and foliage distorted. Officer Willbanks was Arlington's first female officer (she was called the city's only armed secretary) and her dress uniform hangs in the police museum. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176376/
[Arlington Police Officer Teresa Ivy, APD's first African American woman officer]
Photograph of Police officer Teresa Ivy sitting at a desk with a telephone receiver to her ear. She is not in uniform. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176470/
[Arlington Police Officer Terry Lewis's casket carried by the Honor Guard during his funeral, newspaper clipping, 1992]
Photograph of Arlington Police Honor Guard carrying Officer Terry Lewis's casket during his funeral. Officer Lewis was killed in the line of duty by vehicular assault on October 9, 1992. It was taken by Gregg Ellman October 13, 1992 for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176368/
[Arlington Police Officers Gary D. Harl and Terry L. Lewis, street signs]
Photograph of two street signs on a stop sign post that were placed in memory of police officers Gary Harl and Terry Lewis. The picture of the sign post is angled to show clearly the renamed streets: "Gary Harl St 500" (block) and "Terry Lewis St 200" (block). The signs were presented to the families of each officer before being erected on the streets surrounding the main station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176432/
[Arlington Volunteer Police Chaplain Ronnie Armstrong, Sr. obituary]
Photograph of a Fort Worth Star-Telegram newspaper obituary of Arlington Volunteer Police Chaplain Ronnie Armstrong, Sr. who died in 1996. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176451/
[East Arlington Police Service Center dedication, Chaplain Harold Elliott speaking]
Photograph of the Arlington East Police Station dedication with Chaplain Harold Elliott speaking at a podium on a raised platform. Seated on the platform with him are seven other people, six men and a woman. Left to right are: Police Chief David Kunkle, Congressman Dick Armey, Assistant Police Chief Theron Bowman, Mayor Richard Green, U.S. House Rep. Martin Frost, Council Member Paula Hightower, and the Priest from St. Matthews Catholic Church. The brown skirted platform is outside with a parking lot, trees, and a building in the background. East Arlington Police Service Center is also referred to as the East Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176379/
[East Arlington Police Service Center dedication, Chief David Kunkle speaking]
Photograph of the Arlington East Police Station dedication with Police Chief David Kunkle speaking at a podium on a raised platform. Seated on the platform with him are six other people, five men and a woman. Left to right are: vacant chair for Chief Kunkle, Congressman Dick Armey, Assistant Police Chief Theron Bowman, Mayor Richard Green, U.S. House Rep. Martin Frost, Council Member Paula Hightower, and the Priest from St. Matthews Catholic Church. The brown skirted platform is outside with a parking lot, trees, and a building in the background. East Arlington Police Service Center is also referred to as the East Station. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth176378/
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