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  Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library
 Collection: Austin History Center General Collection Photographs
[Rosewood park bandstand]
Photograph of the empty Rosewood Park bandstand. The bandstand is surrounded by electric light posts, and a large tree offers shade to the left. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124742/
[Construction of the Rosewood Recreation Center, now Doris Miller Auditorium, in Rosewood Park]
Photograph of construction of the Negro Recreation Building in Rosewood Park. Three men stand on the back of a 1930s flat bed truck, as they use a crane mounted on the truck to lift half of a laminated wooden semi-circular arched truss into place. Two of the trusses are already completed in the background. The scaffolding used to support workers joining the trusses at their centers stands to the back of the truck. The trusses are joined by cross members, and the half truss erected to the left in the photograph is supported by a post, awaiting the other half of the truss. Two wooden saw horses and several stacks of bags of cement(?) are on the ground under and near the trusses. This photograph appeared in the 1944 Annual Report of the Austin Recreation Department, on page 48, labeled "New Gymnasium - Auditorium at Rosewood". texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124741/
[Children around USN sand sculpture at Sandcraft]
Photograph of a group of children around a sandbox with a sand sculpture of an anchor and the initials U.S.N. (United States Navy) imprinted over it at Sandcraft Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124747/
[Arch construction of the Negro Recreation Building, now Doris Miller Auditorium, in Rosewood Park]
Photograph of the construction of an arch at the Negro Recreation Building, now Doris Miller Auditorium, in Rosewood Park. A man in a fedora sits astride a semi-circular laminated wooden truss, working on joining it at the center. This truss, and two completed trusses in the background are framed against the sky. The trusses are supported by posts, and temporarily joined together with wooden cross braces. The top of a wooden scaffold is visible in the lower right corner of the image. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124740/
[Group of World War I Army enlisted men eating beside tent rows]
Photograph of several enlisted men in what appear to be World War I U.S. infantry uniforms, some wearing sweaters and others thick shirts, eating at the end of a row of field tents. They are eating from metal mess kits, and the meal appears to include biscuits. Several of the men are wearing enlisted visor hats. Three of the men are identified in handwriting on the photograph: Walter, Clyde and George. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124748/
Rosewood Park for Negroes
Photograph of a group of black children watching a youth prepare to dive from the diving board into the public pool at Rosewood Park. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124744/
[Ariel view of Camp Swift including Headquarters, Post Finance Office, U. S. Post Office and north cantonment area]
Photograph of an aerial view of Camp Swift Headquarters, Finance Building, U. S. Post Office and a portion of the north cantonment area. The long wooden buildings are arranged parallel to each other, with the two-story Headquarters building in the center and the one-story Finance and Post Office buildings to each side. A flag pole with flag is visible in the foreground, and the cantonment area buildings are in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124749/
[Delta Sigma Theta members receive certificate]
Photograph of three women of the African-American sorority Delta Sigma Theta accept a certificate from the Travis County Historical Survey Commission on behalf of the Rosewood Recreation Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124746/
[Children swimming at Rosewood Park]
Photograph of a group of African-American children swimming and splashing at the Rosewood Park for Negroes swimming pool. Extensive use of swimming pool and facilities demonstrates success of this recreation center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124743/
[A United States Army private and a woman in Austin's U.S.O. Club]
Photograph of a man and a woman seated at a wooden table at Austin's U.S.O. club. Each holds a bottle of 7up with a straw in it. The man is wearing a United States Army enlisted man's uniform, consisting of a jacket, shirt, tie and pants, and the woman is wearing a dress. There is an empty ashtray on the table in front of them. Austin's U.S.O. Club was located at 111-115 East 6th Street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124165/
[Group of men on horseback, including Sheriff George S. Matthews, in front of Barnes and Company Grocers store]
Photograph of a group of men on horseback in front of Barnes and Company Grocers, including George S. Matthews, who served as Travis County Sheriff from 1902 to 1920. Prior to that Matthews was a deputy sheriff. The men are wearing suits and hats, and some are wearing sashes and ribbons. Horses and buggies are visible behind the men on horseback, just in front of the store. Two women on the store's front porch are wearing long skirts and large hats. The Barnes and Company grocery was a two-story brick building with a two-story front wooden porch, located at 123 West 7th Street at Colorado Street. The railing on the second porch floor has Maltese crosses and Masonic emblems on alternating metal balusters, and a painted wooden slat sign between the floors has a decorative pierced and pointed detail on the bottom side. The painter of the grocery's sign was Philip Bruckmann. The street in front of the store is dirt. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124162/
Court-House crowd [Group of Travis County officials standing on the steps of a stone building]
Photograph of a group of men wearing suits standing on the steps of what may be either the Travis County Courthouse or the Travis County Jail. The identified men, including Judge George Calhoun, District Clerk James P. Hart, and Deputy Sheriff Fred Peck, are all Travis County officials, but most of the group are unidentified. One of the the men is African American, and he appears to be the only person not wearing a suit coat. Several of the men are wearing ties -- including bow ties, string ties and neck ties -- and several are wearing vests and have watch chains. The building behind them is made of stone blocks, with rusticated blocks below and ashlar blocks above. There is a door in the center of the photograph, behind the men, and it is flanked by two double-hung sash windows. Inscribed below the image in ink is "Court-House crowd", and the identifications are written in either ink or pencil with arrows pointing to the identified person. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124161/
[President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt making a whistle-stop campaign appearance in Austin]
Photograph of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt standing behind a podium, on a platform, at the end of a train car as he addresses the large, night-time crowd assembled before him. His outstretched arms grasp the podium. Roosevelt is surrounded by a group of people including his wife, Eleanor, and possibly John Nance Garner ("Cactus Jack"), the vice-president. A neon sign above the train car reads, "PROSPERITY'S ROSE BLOOMS AGAIN WITH ROOSEVELT." The crowd is standing shoulder-to-shoulder. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124167/
[Woman standing with a bicycle with balloon tires]
Photograph of a woman dressed in a white blouse and hat as well as a dark skirt standing on a lawn in front of bushes with a bicycle with balloon tires. She has her right hand on the seat and her left hand on the handlebar. The bicycle is a turn-of-the-century safety model with a single gear and bicycle chain. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124160/
[Lobby and registration desk at the Stephen F. Austin Hotel]
Photograph of the front desk and a portion of the lobby at the Stephen F. Austin Hotel, located at 701 Congress Avenue in Austin. The registration area is made of wood, trimmed in a darker wood, and there are rows of key or letter boxes behind the desk. A rack filled with brochures sits on the desk. A large circular chandelier with shaded lamps hangs from the recessed lobby ceiling, just in front of the registration desk. Wooden, upholstered arm chairs sit in front of square columns on either side of the chandelier. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124168/
[Army enlisted men and women in civilian dress pose with leis at the Austin USO Club]
Photograph of a group of soldiers standing on a stage with women at the U.S.O. Club. All are wearing leis, and some of the soldiers wear white t-shirts with their uniform pants. Most of the women are wearing colorful cotton dresses or skirts. One couple is holding a U.S.O. flag. Two soldiers and one woman are standing on a ladder leading up to the stage. The people look like they are participants in a Hawaiian-themed party or show. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124164/
[Registration desk of the Stephen F. Austin Hotel]
Photograph of the registration desk or front desk at the Stephen F. Austin Hotel, located at 701 Congress Avenue in Austin. The desk sits on a dark marble base, topped by wooden panels and a dark counter. Two cubicles, formed by frosted glass and wooden posts, are at each end of the desk. Visible between them is a bank of key boxes or letter boxes. A ceiling fan and several commercial light fixtures hang from the recessed ceiling. There appears to be a hallway leading away from the left side of the reception desk. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124169/
[Anna Duval Bank's Spring Dance Recital]
Photograph of Anna Duval Bank's Spring Dance Recital with a row of five young girls, including Sharon Ward (second from the front) and Elizabeth Ann Curry (third from the front), wearing drummer costumes and sitting on wooden chairs. They are holding drums decorated with cartoon characters on their laps. Champ Howell, a young boy wearing a similar costume, sits at the end of the row. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124166/
[Treaty Oak]
Photograph of Treaty Oak on Baylor Street between Fifth and Sixth Streets in Austin shows the approximately 450-year-old tree's twisting branches and trunk. A low stone wall surrounds the tree, and sun dapples the grass beneath the branches. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124163/
[Negro War Recreation Council Headquarters building]
Photograph of the Negro War Recreation Council Headquarters building, a concrete frame building located at 702-14 East Avenue (now I-35) in the former city market, repurposed as a bus depot and recreation building for African American soldiers. The windows are 6/6 configuration, many of which are decoratively painted with stars, patriotic shields and the letter "V". The 5-panel double wooden entrance doors, at the center of the photograph, each have painted or decal flags on the second horizontal panel from the top. The sign above the doors reads: "HEADQUARTERS, SUB-BUS STATION, NEGRO WAR RECREATION COUNCIL". To the left of the doors sits a 1930s-era sedan, and to the left of that is a ground-mounted sign that reads: "SUB-BUS STATION for COLORED SOLDIERS". There is a large flag pole, without a flag, visible to the rear of photograph. A wooden bench sits in front of the right building bay. There are several suitcases on the bench, and an overcoat appears to be draped over some of them. The market building was originally constructed as a 1935 Public Works Administration (PWA) project, which opened in June 1935. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124815/
[Interior view of the Negro War Recreation Council Building with 3 women and 3 Soldiers around a table]
Photograph of the interior of the Negro War Recreation Council Building, located at 702-14 East Avenue (now I-35) in the former city market building, showing a group of African Americans, including 3 women and 3 soldiers in uniform. Four of the women and men are seated in couples at a table, while the remaining soldier is sitting on the table as the woman stands in front of it. All of the women are nicely dressed; one has a fur collar and hat, and one has flowers in her hair. The building, which also served as a bus depot, has several wooden benches, roughly constructed of lumber. Several of the windows to the rear of the photograph are decoratively painted with stars, patriotic shields and the letter "V". Three single glass globe pendant light fixtures are visible hanging from the open vaulted ceiling. The market building was originally constructed as a 1935 Public Works Administration (PWA) project, which opened in June 1935. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124812/
[Group of African American women in the Negro War Recreation Council Building]
Photograph of a group of African American women seated in a reading room at the Negro War Recreation Council Building and bus depot, located in the former city market building at 702-14 East Avenue (now I-35). The group is seated in a "U" shape, facing a woman seated at a the head table. Books, a four-drawer card file, magazines, and a radio line the back wall. On the wall there is a war bond poster which reads: "Don't let that shadow touch them, Buy WAR BONDS", where the "shadow" is in the shape of a swastika and three children cower in its wake. There is a wall-mounted electric fan to the right of the war bond poster, and a fur coat hangs on a coat hook on the left window wall. A hand-made poster on a window at the back reads: "ATTENTION, Have you written a Letter home to-day? Writing facilities may be obtained at the information desk. Books and Magazines are available in the office for SERVICE MEN." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124811/
[Don Stence and assistant]
Photograph of Don Stence (seated) of the Austin Parks and Recreation Department and assistant looking over architectural park plans. The drafting desk is covered with drawings and plans. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124817/
[Boys making model airplanes at the Pan American Recreation Center in Austin]
Photograph of a group of six Latino youth making balsa-wood airplanes from a Comet brand "Air-Age Educational Kit" at the Pan American Recreation Center (Pan American Community Center), 300 Comal Street, in Austin. The boys are working at two picnic tables placed end-to-end. Several other people, including a girl, two boys, a man and a woman, stand behind the table either observing or assisting. There is a Mexican tourism poster featuring a woman, with her hair in braids, holding a basket of fruit on the wall behind one of the tables. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124810/
[St. David's Episcopal Church exterior]
Photograph of an oblique view of the south front and west side of Saint David's Episcopal Church located at 301 East 8th Street. The gothic revival stone building has punched gothic windows, edged with stone quoins on the south facade, engaged pilasters and dormer vents. The symetrical south front has a central tower and castleated parapets. Two entrances are visible, both on the west facade: one on the south end and one on the north. There are four children standing in front of the west facade facing the camera, and what appears to be gas lamp standard at the southwest corner. The building was originally constructed in 1854. In 1870 the south addition was constructed, and the south tower was completed in 1885. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124818/
[Playground leaders]
Photograph of a group of playground leaders. Women are seated in the first row, and men are standing in the rear. Beverly Sheffield is identified in the back row, 2nd from right. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124819/
[Swimmers at Rosewood Park pool]
Photograph of swimmers at the swimming pool at the Rosewood Park for Negroes. Because of an extensive remodeling and enlargement program, Rosewood Pool opened its swimming session on June 19, but even with this late start, attendance for the rest of the season totaled 73,155. The completed pool measures 70' x 125' plus an adjacent wading pool that is 20' x 40', giving a combined total of 9,550 sq. ft. A water filtering system was installed with a 3-gallon per minute filter rate. The pool has a 350,000 gallon capacity with a 6-hour turnover. Other improvements include underwater lights in the deep end of the pool. Total cost of improvements was about $68,000. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124624/
Pan American Recreation Center Library
Photograph of children in the stacks at the Pan Am Rec Center library. The shelves are packed with books. Two girls reach for books on shelves within reach. A third boy stands on a child's chair for reach. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124629/
Pan American Recreation Center flag football
Photograph of children, aged about 10-13 play flag football at the Pan Am Recreation Center. A few boys have jerseys that say "Pan Am Aces" on the front; the rest play in plain clothes. A boy in the foreground raises a cup and looks at the camera. The boy next to him leans forward, ready to catch a pass thrown by a boy in sunglasses. Other children stand around casually. The game is not in full-play. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124626/
[Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of the Texas Governor's mansion taken from the northwest. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124269/
[Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of the front entrance of the Texas Governor's mansion taken after a recent snowfall. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124925/
Governor's Mansion Austin, Texas
Photograph of the front entrance to the Texas Governor's mansion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124145/
[Front entry of Governor's Mansion from grounds]
Photograph of the Texas Governor's Mansion front elevation and south elevation showing the entry and grounds. Trees are in front of and partially obscure the upper screened porch of the mansion. The concrete stairs leading to the front porch have one metal handrail on the right. The mansion was built by Abner Cook in 1855 and was continuously occupied since 1856. The occupant here in 1939 was Governor W. Lee O'Daniel. The mansion was declared a Texas historical landmark in 1962 and a national historic landmark in 1970. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124142/
[Front exterior of Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of the Texas Governor's Mansion front elevation and north elevation. The image shows the grounds and entry. The building has a dark downspout on this side of the building. The mansion was built by Abner Cook in 1855 and was continuously occupied since 1856. The occupant here in 1967 was Governor John Connally. The mansion was declared a Texas historical landmark in 1962 and a national historic landmark in 1970. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124141/
[Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of the Texas Governor's mansion taken from the front lawn. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124140/
[Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of the front entrance of the Texas Governor's mansion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124144/
[Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of the Texas Governor's mansion. "Completed in 1856" is typed on front of photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124143/
Putting down striping
Photograph of a worker riding on a self-propelled street striper, repainting the white dashed line of a four-lane road. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124289/
[University of] Texas vs. Kansas City Medics
Photograph of University of Texas Longhorns vs. Kansas City Medics at Clark Field. The weather is sunny and cloudless as the two teams line up against one another. The crowds pack closely together along the two sides of the field. The University of Texas began its football program in 1893 managed by Albert Lefevra, playing two games in the fall and two in the spring. The following year, the team hired its first official head coach, R.D. Wentworth. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124502/
Texas Longhorns of 1941 and Big Boy their Mascot
Photograph of Texas Longhorns of 1941 and Big Boy, their mascot. The 1941 team was ranked no. 1 in the AP poll and declared NCAA National Champions. Their head coach was Dana X. Bible. They were not selected to play in the Rose Bowl, but they made the cover of Life magazine and are still considered one of the greatest Texas teams to this day. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124500/
Sewanee vs. [University of] Texas, 1899
Photograph of Texas vs. Sewanee. Bleachers seat from 150 to 300. Clark Field. Spectators (almost entirely men) crowd the bleachers and the sidelines on both sides of the field. The University of Texas began its football program in 1893 managed by Albert Lefevra, playing two games in the fall and two in the spring. The following year, the team hired its first official head coach, R.D. Wentworth. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124503/
Opening of Pan American Recreation Center
Photograph of the side of the newly built Pan American Recreation Center at 2100 East 3rd Street. Swing sets are behind the building. The previous Pan Am Rec Center existed at 3rd and Comal Streets. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124545/
Pan American Citizenship Class
Photograph of ten elderly women and three men sit around a table at the Pan American Recreation Center for a United States citizenship class. A double sink and cupboards are in the background. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124542/
Pan American Recreation Center Boxing Room
Photograph of one side of the Pan-Am Rec Center Boxing Room. Boxers and trainers exercise by stretching, shadowboxing, and beating punching bags. The sparring ring is visible in the foregrond. Jackets hang on hooks on the left. Clock on the back wall reads about 6:50. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124544/
[English lessons at the Pan American Recreation Center]
Photograph of a group of adults sitting around a table and read from "Elementary Reader - English" books during an English lesson at the Pan Am Rec Center. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124546/
Trio Los Amigos
Photograph of a trio of Mexican mariachi musicians at the Pan American Recreation Center. The mariachi wear sombreros and patterned panchos. The two mariachi on the right and left play guitarrĂ³ns while the middle mariachi plays the Mexican vihuela. The mariachi mouths are open in mid-song. The Pan American Recreation Center was opened in June 1942 as the first Latin American Recreation Center in Austin and run under the auspices of the Federated Latin American Club and directed by the Austin Recreation Department. The name "Pan American Recreation Center" was chosen by the executive committee during a center naming contest. On September 7, 1956, a new Pan American Recreation Center was formally dedicated at 2100 East 3rd Street, just west of the old location and where it currently exists today. The building adjoins Zavala School and was built at a cost of $155,261. The Hillside Theater was later built and completed in June 1958. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124543/
Governor's Mansion
Photograph of the Texas Governor's Mansion in 1882 when it was first occupied. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124115/
[Governor's Mansion behind trees and under snow]
Photograph of Texas Governor's Mansion grounds with snow, trees, greenhouse visible, south and front elevation. Seen from West 10th and Colorado Streets. The mansion was built by Abner Cook in 1855 and continuously occupied since 1856. The mansion was occupied by Governor W. Lee O'Daniel and his wife Molly in 1940 when this image was taken. The mansion was named a Texas historic landmark in 1962 and a National historic landmark in 1970. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124112/
Governor's Mansion Under Snow
Photograph of the Texas Governor's Mansion afer a recent snowfall in February, 1923. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124111/
[Front exterior of Governor's Mansion]
Photograph of exterior front of Texas Governor's Mansion. The columns are dark, and the grounds are a bit unkempt and the windows shuttered. The mansion was built by Abner Cook in 1855 and was continuously occupied since 1856. The occupant here in 1886 was Governor John Ireland. The mansion was declared a Texas historical landmark in 1962 and a national historic landmark in 1970. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth124117/