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  Partner: Austin College
 County: Bell County, TX
[Application for the National Society United States Daughters of the American Revolution]
Application for membership to the National Society United States Daughters of the American Revolution for Ora Osterhout by claim of her relation to Jeremiah Osterhout. The application details her genealogy and Jeremiah's service during the American Revolution. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255604/
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public by Charles Allen Culberson, governor of Texas, for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the Secretary of State and the governor of Texas. It allowed John to work in this office in Bell County. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255645/
[Certificate of Appointment to Postmaster for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of Appointment to Postmaster of Belton, Texas presented to John Patterson Osterhout. The document was signed by the president, Benjamin Harrison, and the postmaster general, John Wanamaker. He was able to hold the position until the end of the next session of the Senate. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255644/
[Certificate of Appointment to Postmaster for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Postmaster by President Chester Alan Arthur for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the President and the Postmaster General, Walter Q. Gresham. It certified John to work as Postmaster in Belton, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255646/
[Elector Registration in Belton, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout]
Elector registration in Belton, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout that certifies that John meets all the qualifications for being an elector. The registrar of voters, R. D. Kinney, signed to prove that the aforementioned information was correct on October 17, 1872. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255641/
[Envelope to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 30, 1879]
Envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout," Junia Roberts Osterhout, in Factoryville, Pennsylvania. The envelope is postmarked for October 30, 1879 from Belton, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255444/
[Letter from African American People of Bell County to William McKinley, June, 1897]
Letter from African American people of Bell County to President William McKinley regarding John Patterson Osterhout's application to be postmaster of Belton, Texas. The letter includes a list of African Americans who live in Bell County that vouch for John's trustworthiness. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255619/
[Letter from E. M. Drayton to William McKinley, February 19, 1897]
Letter from E. M. Drayton to President William McKinley regarding John Patterson Osterhout applying for the position of postmaster in Belton, Texas. He wrote that he could think of no one better to fill the position. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255613/
[Letter from F. M. Law to William McKinley, February 15, 1897]
Letter from F. M. Law to President William McKinley regarding John Patterson Osterhout applying for postmaster in Belton, Texas. He gives John a high amount of praise and states that he has the support of the administration of Baylor College. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255612/
[Letter from George Robinson to John Patterson Osterhout, February 17, 1897]
Letter from George Robinson to Judge John Patterson Osterhout regarding the trustworthiness of John. The letter is short and simply states that the judge was deserving of respect and was held in high esteem. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255611/
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to George E. Osterhout, February 13, 1899]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her cousin, George E. Osterhout, discussing a loan. Gertrude wanted to borrow a few hundred dollars from George and would be grateful if he would lend it. She intended to write him a longer letter when the weather improved. Included is an envelope addressed "Mr. Geo. E. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255555/
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, November 13, 1881]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her mother, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing her life at school. She wrote about a trip to town she had taken with other girls and the new faculty and campus. The faculty was young this upcoming session and she said the campus was being built slowly. She mentioned some news she had heard from others and asked her mother about mutual acquaintances. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255591/
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Ora and Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 21, 1879]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her sisters, Ora and Junia Roberts Osterhout. She wrote to her sisters while they were visiting family with their mother. She let her sisters know of some guests that had stopped by to see them. Gertrude hoped that her younger sisters were behaving and enjoying their time with family. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255432/
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, December 3, 1879]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her brother, Paul Osterhout, discussing family news in Belton, Texas. Because their mother has been wanting to see Paul ever since she returned from Pennsylvania, Gertrude hopes he will be able to return for Christmas. Gertrude told him that she had been appointed assistant conductor of a local temperance club. Gertrude ended the letter early because there were visitors at her home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255455/
[Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, November 13, 1879]
Letter from Gertrude Osterhout to her brother, Paul Osterhout, discussing recent news in Belton, Texas. She told him that their mother, Junia Roberts Osterhout, had not yet returned home and updated him on recent baptisms and conversions at the local church. She mentioned temperance meetings she had been attending and a trip she had made recently to collect pecans. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255452/
[Letter from H. J. Bardwell to John Patterson Osterhout, December 5, 1896]
Letter from H. J. Bardwell to John Patterson Osterhout regarding questions he had about the Osterhout family. He asked John where an older member of the family was born and who her parents were so he could trace the family farther back. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255532/
[Letter from J. H. James to John Patterson Osterhout, July 2, 1899]
Letter from J. H. James to John Patterson Osterhout regarding an outstanding debt. James was upset that John refused any aid for a debt that James was trying to repay despite the help James has given John's family over the years. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255556/
[Letter from J. Z. Miller, February 16, 1897]
Letter from J. Z. Miller to unknown discussing the work of John Patterson Osterhout. Miller told the gentleman he was writing that John was a respectable judge and had done good work. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255610/
[Letter from John Jeremiah Osterhout to Bud, April 2, 1881]
A brief letter from John Jeremiah Osterhout to Bud with news from Belton, Texas. He wrote that he had recently gone to a ball. He discussed people who had recently fallen ill and described his family's health. He ended the letter by stating that one of their cows had had a calf and that they were considering selling one of their animals. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255469/
[Letter from John Jeremiah Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, November 22, 1885]
Letter from John Jeremiah Osterhout to his brother, Paul Osterhout, updating him on events at home. John regretted not writing sooner and mentioned an expensive wedding that was being planned in Belton, Texas. He told Paul that he was well and that some of their mutual acquaintances had arrived in town. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255506/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, April 3, 1881]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, discussing news from home and some items that she sent to Gertrude. Junia had fabric, shoes, and money sent to her daughter and told her she would have to get a dress made where she was. Her mother told her how her family and friends were doing and that she was worried about the headaches Gertrude was experiencing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255576/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, April 26, 1881]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, regarding news from home. He told her that Gertrude's sisters had recovered from being sick. He and his wife were trying to raise money to send to Gertrude and her brother, Paul, although he told his daughter that she needed to make sacrifices while she was in school. He ended the letter with other various bits of local news and looked forward to seeing her return home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255580/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, December 4, 1880]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, discussing life at home. He wrote of a child that had died and that some of the family had gone to the burial. He then discussed in his letter how Gertrude and her brother, Paul, would be returning home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255569/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, January 10, 1881]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, about what was happening in Belton, Texas. He told her that she should have written sooner if she wanted a reply letter earlier. He regretted telling her that he had found out about her dancing at a local party and a committee had been organized to investigate the incident. He advised her to write the committee a letter lest they rescind her membership in the church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255464/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, March 19, 1881]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, with news from home. Everyone at home at been well, except for her mother who had a cold. They had four cows that they milked and used the milk to make butter to sell. He told his daughter that she should not be so eager for school to be over. He concluded the letter by correcting his daughter on her use of the word "too." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255472/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, May 7, 1881]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, discussing daily life at home. He mentioned that they would be able to make some money by producing buttermilk and that they would be getting more poultry soon. John's uncle, Peter, was having a birthday soon and he requested that Gertrude write a letter to him so that he may pass it along. The letter closed with John saying that it was his birthday the next day and that he wanted Gertrude and his son, Paul, to write to him. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255588/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, September 17, 1882]
A brief letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, with news from home. He wrote with news of the family's health and a recent murder that occurred in town. Included is an envelope addressed to "Gertrude Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255482/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Gertrude Osterhout, September 24, 1880]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his daughter, Gertrude Osterhout, discussing affairs at home. He wrote about his family's health and a show that came to Belton, Texas that his sons went to see. He told Gertrude that he hoped he would come to like the doctors she worked with and that his son needed to start working on their cotton crop. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255566/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to John Jeremiah Osterhout, December 10, 1895]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, John Jeremiah Osterhout, with news from his family. His older son, Paul, was living poorly, but was about to make a fortune. His wife, Junia, believed she was sick again and the family was trying to make her rest. He let Jeremiah know that his daughter was doing well and wanted to see him. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255526/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout and Family, November 2, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, and family with news from Belton, Texas. He claimed to be lonesome because his wife and two youngest daughters were visiting family in Pennsylvania and their eldest son Paul had moved out. He told her about how the remaining children at home were doing and shared other pieces of news from Belton. The letter ended with him prompting her to write more and to send notice before she starts for home. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255450/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, August 18, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. John wrote his wife while she was away visiting family. He updated her about how their family was doing, a trade he made, and an event that their children attended. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255426/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, August 26, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. John wrote about how their family was faring while Junia was away. He mentioned a church meeting they attended recently that saw many baptisms and conversions. He told her that he would send her money around Christmas if she wanted to return home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255427/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 13, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. John wrote his wife while she was away visiting family. He told her that their son, Paul, might be making progress in the telegraph business and that a local priest was conducting a protracted meeting. The county fair was about to begin, although John did not think they would take much part in it. He ended the letter by stating that he was not sure when Junia planned on returning. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255439/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 24, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, regarding the departure of their son, Paul, who left home in order to manage a telegraph office in another town. John continued his letter with local news, including the county fair, various persons who were on trial, and a Methodist protracted meeting at a local church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255441/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 26, 1879]
A letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing how family life had been since Junia left to visit with extended family. John let her know of local baptisms and poultry sales he had made at the recent fair. He and their daughter, Gertrude, were looking forward to Junia's return home. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255442/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 29, 1879]
A letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, expressing his regret that the house felt lonesome without Junia and the three children that were away. He hopes that his son, Paul, will return to live with them if the telegraph company relocates him to an office in town. John then told Junia that when she was ready to make the return home, she should consider whether or not to purchase a second class ticket for the train. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255445/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 28, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, September 28, 1879. John began his letter with bad news. A fire broke out in Belton, Texas and John wrote of the difficulties he and his sons had in trying to save some of his books and papers. Otherwise, John says he and the children are in good health and mentioned work that Paul had done work in a telegraph office recently. Included is an envelope addressed "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout" and an article titled "Fire in Belton!" The article lists the losses incurred from the disaster. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255436/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout to Family, September 6, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, and children. He wrote his wife while she was away. He told her that their son, Paul, was house-sitting for someone in the neighborhood and had the unfortunate news that a woman's baby had died. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255428/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, April 12, 1881]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, involving the state of the family while Paul was away at school. A family has been feeling sick, possibly with the measles, and John was able to make sales on some of his cattle. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255470/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, December 1, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, discussing family news in Belton, Texas. John's wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, and two daughters returned from visiting family in Pennsylvania. He wrote about the state of his cattle and chickens and how he was tending to them. The letter ended with John hoping that Paul would join them for Christmas. Included is an envelope addressed to "Paul Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255454/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, December 5, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, discussing local news from Belton, Texas. He informed Paul that if he came home for Christmas he would give him molasses. Also, he also updated him about various family members and farm animals and shared other pieces of news. Included is an envelope addressed to "Paul Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255456/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, June 04, 1880]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, discussing work. John was writing from his place of work, the post office, and gave Paul some advice regarding how he should go about receiving work from "G. O." John hoped to send his son to school at Baylor in the fall and promised to write again later. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255458/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, June 7, 1886]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, regarding Paul's return home. John sold Paul's bike and sent him money to help him afford the trip home. John expects his other son, Jeremiah, and his wife to have a child soon because she has been staying with their family for long periods of time. John mentioned that their town, Belton, was worried that their oil well would leave town and they would have to rely on the college for their future. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255514/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, May 10, 1881]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, about how glad he is that Paul went to school. John looked forward to seeing Paul and his sister's, Gertrude, educational growth. He expressed worry about his younger son, John Jeremiah, not showing any interest in receiving education. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255474/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, May 22, 1886]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, regarding Paul returning home for a visit. John recommended Paul get his certification to practice being a doctor before he graduates. John sent what money he could and if Paul was able, he had a list of people he wanted Paul to try to visit. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255511/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Paul Osterhout, October 30, 1879]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his son, Paul Osterhout, discussing family life since Paul's departure to work at a telegraph office in another city. He told his son about the recent successful sales of poultry he made and that he had hopes for Paul's future career. John gave his son advice and hoped he would be able to come home and visit soon. Included is an envelope addressed to "Paul Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255447/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sally Osterhout, January 13, 1875]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his niece, Sally Osterhout. He wrote her after receiving a letter a couple weeks prior. He was glad to hear his mother was well and told Sally what was happening with John and his family. He mentioned some of the cases he was working on, his children's schooling, and how his wife had recently come down with a pneumonia. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255393/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, July 11, 1872]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout. He wrote to tell his mother that he would be unable to visit this year and spoke of how his family had been. The letter finishes with news regarding the frontier. John wrote that Indians raided nearby areas and took horses. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255361/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, May 20, 1877]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout. He wrote his mother to let her know how his family was doing. He told her he was sorry to hear that someone was sick and gave his recommendation to have the man inhale smoke to help him. He then went on to write about his beliefs that inhaling smoke was good for the lungs and that he learned this from inhaling smoke from a campfire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255417/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, November 21, 1876]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout. He wrote his mother to tell her that his children are in good health and that Junia is recovering from an illness. Also, he and his son Paul are planning to start a ranching business with their sheep. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255410/
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