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  Partner: Austin College
 Decade: 1850-1859
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public in Austin County, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the Texas governor, Hardin Runners Runnels, and the Secretary of State, J. S. Anderson. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255652/
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public in Texas for John Patterson Osterhout signed by the Texas governor, Elisha M. Pease, and the Secretary of State, Edward Clark. In the center of the certificate is a hole that renders parts of it unreadable. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255651/
[Marriage Certificate for John Patterson and Junia Roberts Osterhout]
Marriage certificate for John Patterson and Junia Roberts Osterhout officiated by William Frear of the Baptist church. The wedding was held at the house of Henry Roberts in Pennsylvania and witnessed by P. M. Osterhout, James Frear, and Henry Roberts. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255647/
[Letter of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Letter of appointment to Public Notary for John Patterson Osterhout for the county of Austin. It was signed by the governor of Texas, Peter Hansborough Bell, and the Secretary of State. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255643/
[Appointment of John Patterson Osterhout as Attorney to Hazel P. Ford]
Appointment of John Patterson Osterhout as Hazel P. Ford's attorney to allow him to receive bounty and law warrants that were due to Ford for military services. At the bottom of the document, a clerk verified that the statement was signed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255632/
[Letter from the Pension Office to John Patterson Osterhout, July 2, 1858]
Letter from the Pension Office to John Patterson Osterhout discussing Lewis Summer's request for a war bounty scrip instead of land. The request was view favorably and sent to the Office of the Secretary of the Treasury. Included is an envelope addressed to "John P. Osterhout Esq." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255633/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his Brother, October 19, 1859]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother regarding land in Texas. He sold a couple hundred acres out of the 400 acres he bought a few years earlier. He wrote about other land he had bought and the cheap pricing of land in Texas. An uncle of theirs was thinking about moving to Texas and John agreed that he should and could get a lot of land for his money. He gave some advice for his uncle if he chose to move to Texas and recommended he should have a few thousand dollars before coming. At the end of the letter, John wrote about several pieces of furniture and cattle he purchased. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255315/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Orlando Osterhout, April 25, 1859]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother, Orlando Osterhout, thanking him for the news in his letter. John and his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, expressed their desire to hear more from Orlando and wanted him to visit their parents to gather more news. He wrote briefly about what he and his wife were doing and in the post script, he asked for a canning recipe for his wife. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255312/
[Letter from Diana Maray to John Patterson Osterhout, December 5, 1854]
Letter from Diana Maray to John Patterson Osterhout discussing daily life in Athens, Pennsylvania. Letters had been received from other family members and her children were doing well in school. In the state of Pennsylvania, the temperance movement was working to get a prohibitive liquor law passed. She closed her letter by writing about what she felt made a real friend and hoped she would meet John in this life or the next. She included two locks of hair, one from each of her sons. Included is an envelope addressed to "John P. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255305/
[Letter to General, December 12, 1851]
Letter from unknown to general discussing the author's travels from Pennsylvania to the South. He detailed the route he took through Pennsylvania and where he made stops, including Philadelphia and Delaware county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255302/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, February 4, 1855]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Sarah Osterhout, regarding his time in Bellville, Texas. He apologized for not writing her sooner since he has been busy with setting up his business as a lawyer. He was considering purchasing slaves although he mentioned a preference for having "white hands" to work with like he did in Pennsylvania. Recently, his friends had been telling him that he was in a good position to marry and he told his mother that he had someone from Pennsylvania in mind. The rest of his family was offended that he had not written then, but he felt that they read the letters he sent to each of them and that it would be repetitive to write the same thing to all of them. He told his mother not to share this letter with any of them and shared that his lawyer business was going well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255307/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his Brother, January 18, 1857]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother regarding his time in Bellville, Texas. He was appreciative of his brother sending him news from home and told him about a real estate sale that had happened recently. People from the U.S., Germany, and Bohemia were in attendance and alcohol was passed around. Money has been short in Bellville because of the cotton and corn crops failing. John needed to borrow money and requested a loan from his brother or anyone else in the family. He requested that his brother write again soon with more news from home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255308/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, March 8, 1852
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout, regarding his time in Bellville, Texas since his recent move there. He was undecided about whether or not he would remain in the county or travel around Texas. He wrote about how sparse buildings were where he lived and that the way wealth was measured there was not by amount of land, but by the amount of slaves owned. Many in the area had begun growing their own gardens and he had learned from them that he needed to be careful of poisonous spiders and centipedes. John told his mother that the mail was arriving with irregularity and they were lucky if they got it once a week. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255304/
[Letter from P. M. Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, March 18, 1857]
Letter from P. M. Osterhout to his brother, John Patterson Osterhout, discussing news from home and slavery. After providing John with updates from those at home, he told his brother he was unsure whether or not he would want to receive something from the black Republican in Pennsylvania. He then went on to write about his opinion on slavery and he hoped his brother was not beginning to view it as a blessing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255309/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his Brother, April 29, 1859]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother discussing brief news about him and his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. He sent gifts to some friends and that he hoped they arrived safely. He had begun constructing a kitchen and dining room for his home and asked that his brother try to locate some seeds that were misplaced somewhere. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255313/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, December 21, 1851]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout, discussing his safe arrival to Bellville, Texas. He told her he might be staying there for a few months and starting a school, but was unsure. He promised to write her a longer letter soon and let her know the mail only came through once a week. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255303/
[Business Card for John Patterson Osterhout]
Business card for John Patterson Osterhout, an attorney and collector of claims for Austin and surrounding counties. On the back of the card is a note concerning that if money was collected from a claim, it would be paid to someone while John would retain half as commission. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255625/
[Certificate of Payment]
Certificate of payment stating that E. H. Cantes was owed money and that John Patterson Osterhout, an attorney, would obtain the payment and receive half as commission. On the back the certificate says the payment was received in full on March 15, 1855. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255622/
[Proof of Payment for Military Service]
Proof of payment by John Patterson Osterhout for the military service of John N. Robinson. The money was due to Eliza Bennett and was paid in full. The payment was signed and dated by John Ridens. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255627/
[Certificate of Payment]
Certificate of payment for J. Bird and the enlisted help of John Patterson Osterhout, an attorney, in collecting the debt. On the back of the certificate it states that the debt was paid in full on March 15, 1855. Included is a business card for John Patterson Osterhout. The card states he is an attorney for Bellville, Texas and on the back of the card is an agreement for another collection to be done by John. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255628/
[Oath of Service in the Western Frontier of Texas]
Oath of military service in the Western Frontier of Texas during an invasion by Mexico. The oath was made by H. M. Watkins and B. N. Robinson and certified that Private [Juno] D. Banton[deco], deceased, served under General Vasquez. John Davidson, the county clerk, served as a witness to the oath and added his seal of office to the paper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255626/
[Oath of Service in the Western Frontier of Texas for Elijah Collar]
Oath of service in the Western frontier of Texas for Elijah Collar in the fall of 1842 under General Wall. The oath was taken by James J. Allphin and tracked where Private Collar went in the Western frontier. It stated that he served in R. Williams's company as a private. On the bottom, a notary public, James S. Fai[rl]y, certified the oath and added his seal to the paper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255623/