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  Partner: Austin College
[Passport to Travel for James E. Flowers]
Passport to travel for James E. Flowers issued by David G. Burnet under the power of the Republic of Texas. The passport entitled Mr. Flowers, a citizen of the republic, to pass freely. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255631/
[Letter from J. W. Mann to Robert M. Johnson, October, 1837]
Letter from J. W. Mann to Robert M. Johnson introducing an attorney by the name of John Patterson Osterhout. Mr. Mann regards John Osterhout highly and informed Mr. Johnson that he was going to Arkansas to practice law. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255301/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Orlando Osterhout, October 30, 1838]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother, Orlando Osterhout, discussing recent events in his life. He attended a Baptist convention in Independence, Texas and planned to return there to attend an examination of students at Baylor University. He wrote about the woman he was courting and told his brother that he hoped he would not remain a bachelor. John intended to return home and considered the different routes he could take while also requesting that his brother give him access to transportation in the winter so he could visit a friend. Soule University planned to lay a cornerstone soon in a Masonic ceremony and John wanted to be attendance. The letter ended with John making fun of the LaGrange Volunteer Rifle Rangers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255311/
[Letter to General, December 12, 1851]
Letter from unknown to general discussing the author's travels from Pennsylvania to the South. He detailed the route he took through Pennsylvania and where he made stops, including Philadelphia and Delaware county. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255302/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, December 21, 1851]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout, discussing his safe arrival to Bellville, Texas. He told her he might be staying there for a few months and starting a school, but was unsure. He promised to write her a longer letter soon and let her know the mail only came through once a week. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255303/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, March 8, 1852
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother, Sarah Osterhout, regarding his time in Bellville, Texas since his recent move there. He was undecided about whether or not he would remain in the county or travel around Texas. He wrote about how sparse buildings were where he lived and that the way wealth was measured there was not by amount of land, but by the amount of slaves owned. Many in the area had begun growing their own gardens and he had learned from them that he needed to be careful of poisonous spiders and centipedes. John told his mother that the mail was arriving with irregularity and they were lucky if they got it once a week. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255304/
[Letter of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Letter of appointment to Public Notary for John Patterson Osterhout for the county of Austin. It was signed by the governor of Texas, Peter Hansborough Bell, and the Secretary of State. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255643/
[Business Card for John Patterson Osterhout]
Business card for John Patterson Osterhout, an attorney and collector of claims for Austin and surrounding counties. On the back of the card is a note concerning that if money was collected from a claim, it would be paid to someone while John would retain half as commission. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255625/
[Oath of Service in the Western Frontier of Texas]
Oath of military service in the Western Frontier of Texas during an invasion by Mexico. The oath was made by H. M. Watkins and B. N. Robinson and certified that Private [Juno] D. Banton[deco], deceased, served under General Vasquez. John Davidson, the county clerk, served as a witness to the oath and added his seal of office to the paper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255626/
[Oath of Service in the Western Frontier of Texas for Elijah Collar]
Oath of service in the Western frontier of Texas for Elijah Collar in the fall of 1842 under General Wall. The oath was taken by James J. Allphin and tracked where Private Collar went in the Western frontier. It stated that he served in R. Williams's company as a private. On the bottom, a notary public, James S. Fai[rl]y, certified the oath and added his seal to the paper. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255623/
[Proof of Payment for Military Service]
Proof of payment by John Patterson Osterhout for the military service of John N. Robinson. The money was due to Eliza Bennett and was paid in full. The payment was signed and dated by John Ridens. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255627/
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public in Texas for John Patterson Osterhout signed by the Texas governor, Elisha M. Pease, and the Secretary of State, Edward Clark. In the center of the certificate is a hole that renders parts of it unreadable. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255651/
[Certificate of Payment]
Certificate of payment for J. Bird and the enlisted help of John Patterson Osterhout, an attorney, in collecting the debt. On the back of the certificate it states that the debt was paid in full on March 15, 1855. Included is a business card for John Patterson Osterhout. The card states he is an attorney for Bellville, Texas and on the back of the card is an agreement for another collection to be done by John. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255628/
[Appointment of John Patterson Osterhout as Attorney to Hazel P. Ford]
Appointment of John Patterson Osterhout as Hazel P. Ford's attorney to allow him to receive bounty and law warrants that were due to Ford for military services. At the bottom of the document, a clerk verified that the statement was signed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255632/
[Letter from Diana Maray to John Patterson Osterhout, December 5, 1854]
Letter from Diana Maray to John Patterson Osterhout discussing daily life in Athens, Pennsylvania. Letters had been received from other family members and her children were doing well in school. In the state of Pennsylvania, the temperance movement was working to get a prohibitive liquor law passed. She closed her letter by writing about what she felt made a real friend and hoped she would meet John in this life or the next. She included two locks of hair, one from each of her sons. Included is an envelope addressed to "John P. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255305/
[Certificate of Payment]
Certificate of payment stating that E. H. Cantes was owed money and that John Patterson Osterhout, an attorney, would obtain the payment and receive half as commission. On the back the certificate says the payment was received in full on March 15, 1855. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255622/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Sarah Osterhout, February 4, 1855]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Sarah Osterhout, regarding his time in Bellville, Texas. He apologized for not writing her sooner since he has been busy with setting up his business as a lawyer. He was considering purchasing slaves although he mentioned a preference for having "white hands" to work with like he did in Pennsylvania. Recently, his friends had been telling him that he was in a good position to marry and he told his mother that he had someone from Pennsylvania in mind. The rest of his family was offended that he had not written then, but he felt that they read the letters he sent to each of them and that it would be repetitive to write the same thing to all of them. He told his mother not to share this letter with any of them and shared that his lawyer business was going well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255307/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his Brother, January 18, 1857]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother regarding his time in Bellville, Texas. He was appreciative of his brother sending him news from home and told him about a real estate sale that had happened recently. People from the U.S., Germany, and Bohemia were in attendance and alcohol was passed around. Money has been short in Bellville because of the cotton and corn crops failing. John needed to borrow money and requested a loan from his brother or anyone else in the family. He requested that his brother write again soon with more news from home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255308/
[Letter from P. M. Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, March 18, 1857]
Letter from P. M. Osterhout to his brother, John Patterson Osterhout, discussing news from home and slavery. After providing John with updates from those at home, he told his brother he was unsure whether or not he would want to receive something from the black Republican in Pennsylvania. He then went on to write about his opinion on slavery and he hoped his brother was not beginning to view it as a blessing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255309/
[Certificate of Appointment to Notary Public for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of appointment to Notary Public in Austin County, Texas for John Patterson Osterhout. The certificate was signed by the Texas governor, Hardin Runners Runnels, and the Secretary of State, J. S. Anderson. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255652/
[Letter from the Pension Office to John Patterson Osterhout, July 2, 1858]
Letter from the Pension Office to John Patterson Osterhout discussing Lewis Summer's request for a war bounty scrip instead of land. The request was view favorably and sent to the Office of the Secretary of the Treasury. Included is an envelope addressed to "John P. Osterhout Esq." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255633/
[Marriage Certificate for John Patterson and Junia Roberts Osterhout]
Marriage certificate for John Patterson and Junia Roberts Osterhout officiated by William Frear of the Baptist church. The wedding was held at the house of Henry Roberts in Pennsylvania and witnessed by P. M. Osterhout, James Frear, and Henry Roberts. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255647/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Orlando Osterhout, April 25, 1859]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother, Orlando Osterhout, thanking him for the news in his letter. John and his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, expressed their desire to hear more from Orlando and wanted him to visit their parents to gather more news. He wrote briefly about what he and his wife were doing and in the post script, he asked for a canning recipe for his wife. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255312/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his Brother, April 29, 1859]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother discussing brief news about him and his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. He sent gifts to some friends and that he hoped they arrived safely. He had begun constructing a kitchen and dining room for his home and asked that his brother try to locate some seeds that were misplaced somewhere. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255313/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his Brother, October 19, 1859]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his brother regarding land in Texas. He sold a couple hundred acres out of the 400 acres he bought a few years earlier. He wrote about other land he had bought and the cheap pricing of land in Texas. An uncle of theirs was thinking about moving to Texas and John agreed that he should and could get a lot of land for his money. He gave some advice for his uncle if he chose to move to Texas and recommended he should have a few thousand dollars before coming. At the end of the letter, John wrote about several pieces of furniture and cattle he purchased. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255315/
[Letter from David Osterhout to Orlando Osterhout, July 29, 1860]
Letter from David Osterhout to his brother, Orlando Osterhout, discussing his family. His children had gotten well after having the measles and he said they were doing well after moving to Texas. The hot weather was making it difficult for David to work and he wished he had money to buy cattle and sheep to lighten his work load. He hoped his letter found Orlando well and wanted to hear from him soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255316/
[Certificate of the Election to Justice of the Peace for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of the election to the Justice of the Peace for John Patterson Osterhout signed by Texas governor Sam Houston and the Secretary of State. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255650/
[Letter from J. W. McDade to Headquarters, March 19, 1862]
Letter from J. W. McDade to Headquarters concerning Private John Patterson Osterhout's detachment. The brief message stated that John was officially detached from his unit and had to report back to his company after seven days. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255317/
[Soldier's Discharge Papers for John Patterson Osterhout]
Soldier's discharge papers for John Patterson Osterhout due to his term of service expiring. He was discharged honorably from the army of the Confederate States on April 25, 1862. The document includes a basic description of his appearance and who he served under. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255636/
[Certificate of the Election to Adjutant for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of the election to adjutant of the 23rd Battalion of the Texas State Troops for John Patterson Osterhout. It was part of a rally for troops for the Civil War and the certificate was signed by the governor, Francis Richard Lubbock, and the Secretary of State. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255649/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, January 24, 1864]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing his time with the Confederate Army. He was grateful to receive her letters from home and detailed the marches that he had been enduring. Like many of the other men felt unwell, he felt unwell, and they were preparing for battle when he concluded the first part of his letter. The second part was written the next day after the soldier's new camp had been secured. The men were living off of a diet of oysters that day and John thought they might be reorganizing later that month. He wished he could see his children, especially his eldest son, Paul Osterhout, and hoped they would stay safe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255318/
[Transcript of Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, January 24, 1864]
Transcript of letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing his time with the Confederate Army. He was grateful to receive her letters from home and detailed the marches that he had been enduring. Like many of the other men, he felt unwell, and they were preparing for battle when he concluded the first part of his letter. The second part was written the next day after the soldier's new camp had been secured. The men were living off of a diet of oysters that day and John thought they might be reorganizing later that month. He wished he could see his children, especially his eldest son, Paul Osterhout, and hoped they would stay safe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255320/
[Letter from S. C. Page, September 24, 1864]
Letter from S. C. Page to friend discussing her travels to hospitals to tend to wounded soldiers from Louisiana. She took with her sacks of clothes and letters and gave money when she could. She was appalled at the injuries she saw and the lack of clothing some men received while they were hospitalized. Page went to multiple hospitals and introduced herself to the Louisianan soldiers to give them company. She earned the nickname "Lady Bountiful" during her travels. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255323/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, October 30, 1864]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout, discussing his time traveling with his oxen wagon. He and his companion, Jo, have had difficulties keeping the oxen in line and have been searching for the ones that have run off. On the route he has taken, he noticed a lot of cotton making its way to Mexico. He was asking around for the price of a bushel of wheat and because of the missing oxen, he was unable to purchase as much as he had planned. He closed his letter by telling her he would be unable to return home until December. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255324/
[General Pass for John Patterson Osterhout]
General pass for John Patterson Osterhout from the Provost Marshal General's Office. The pass allowed John to travel in Texas under oath that he would not leak any information about the Confederate States of America. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255637/
[Certificate of Voter Registration for John Patterson Osterhout]
Certificate of voter registration for John Patterson Osterhout in Austin county. Chief Justice of Austin county, C. B. Oney, testified that John fulfilled the oath of amnesty and John Campbell, county clerk, attested to the registration. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255639/
[Letter from Leyman Richardson to John Patterson Osterhout, May 14, 1866]
Letter from Leyman Richardson to his friend, John Patterson Osterhout, in response to a letter John sent a month earlier. Leyman was grateful to hear that John had survived the Civil War and informed him of what was happening with the Richardson family. The government requested that Leyman be in charge of a school for children who were orphaned by the war, but decided it was too big of a project for his family. Included is an envelope addressed to "John P. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255326/
[Letter from Libbie to Junia Roberts Osterhout, March 1, 1869]
Letter from Libbie to her aunt, Junia Roberts Osterhout, about life in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Libbie wrote of a recent, elegant wedding she had attended and some of the fashion she had been seeing recently. At school, she got held after for breaking one of the rules. The letter closed when it became too late for her to continue writing. Included is an envelope addressed to "Mrs. J. P. Osterhout." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255327/
[Letter from Sarah Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, January 9, 1870]
Letter from Sarah Osterhout to her son, John Patterson Osterhout. She told her son about her health, family members, and local news. She wrote in length about people she knew and mentioned that she wished to send John some vegetables. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255337/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, May 8, 1870]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. He was writing from the State capitol about his time working there. He wrote of his opinion of the Republican Party and wished his wife and family well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255338/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout, July 16, 1870]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his mother. He wrote to her to inform her about his family's affairs. He told her about his work and his affiliation with the radical Republican Party. In the letter, he stated that he believed they were the South's hope for prosperity. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255332/
[Letter from E. Kirlin to Junia Roberts Osterhout, July 20, 1870]
Letter from E. Kirlin to his sister, Junia Roberts Osterhout. He wrote to let her know that a package had been sent out for her. He mentioned their mother being ill recently and a trip he was planning to take soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255334/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, November 9, 1870]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to his wife, Junia Roberts Osterhout. In his letter, he went into detail about his travels, what he did during his time in town, and his work as a judge. He told her that in some of his cases there were papers missing or partially destroyed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255351/
[Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, November 13, 1870]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her husband, John Patterson Osterhout. She wrote her husband to let him know how she and their children were doing at home. She mentioned that their son, Paul, had started going to school again recently and would be writing a letter to John soon. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255335/
[Letter from Paul and Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, November 20, 1870]
Letter from Paul and Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout. Paul told his father that he was well and had started school recently. Junia informed him of the recent weather and how she and their children had been doing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255336/
[Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, November 27, 1870]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her husband, John Patterson Osterhout. She wrote to him about how she and their children had been doing and mentioned letters she had written and received recently. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255331/
[Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout, November 30, 1870]
Letter from John Patterson Osterhout to Junia Roberts Osterhout. He wrote to her from a boarding house and related to her how his travels have been recently and what his plans are. He briefly mentioned the danger of attacks from Indians on the next part of his trip to Stephenville. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255329/
[Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to John Patterson Osterhout, December 4, 1870]
Letter from Junia Roberts Osterhout to her husband, John Patterson Osterhout. She wrote a short letter to update her husband on what was happening at home with their children. She hoped that he would be home soon and that she would receive a letter from him shortly. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255330/
[Letter from Sarah Hartly to Junia Roberts Osterhout, December 10, 1870]
Letter from Sarah Hartly to Junia Roberts Osterhout. The letter was written in two parts on different days. In the first half, Sarah informs Junia of her daily life. In the second portion of the letter, she tells Junia that she recently received news of a death in the family and writes about how her children have grown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255328/
Indian Affairs: Speech of Hon. Edward Degener, of Texas, delivered in the House of Representatives, January 21, 1871.
Text of a speech by a Texas Representative to the U.S. House of Representatives regarding acts committed by Indians against people living in certain counties of Texas, including the number of persons killed, injured, or kidnapped, and property stolen. The speech references a bill drafted to address the issue, titled "A bill for the better protection of the frontiers of Texas" and includes some dialogue with other Representatives. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth255635/
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