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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1970-1979
 Language: English
[402 SW 5th Street]
A Victorian home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here at 402 SW 5th Street. Note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and wraparound porch. The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, suggesting that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16167/
[612 NW 6th Street]
This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16172/
[915 NW 4th Avenue]
The home at 915 NW 4th Avenue was built by Hugh Coleman in 1906. It was the first elegant home built on NW 4th Avenue, and it was designed as an entertainment and social center. The style of the house has been tentatively identified as Italian Renaissance. This house was also home to the John Moore family, and to the family of Gerald Talkington. The photograph of house was taken April 4, 1976. This photograph is to be found on page 183 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16165/
Air Masses
This booklet gives an overview of air masses as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Explanation of the classification of air masses; weather associated with particular air masses; [and the] trajectory and source region of air masses that invade the United States." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46578/
Atmosphere and Temperature
This booklet gives an overview of atmosphere and temperature as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Pressure scale measurement, isobars, forces that affect winds, high and low pressure systems and associate weather[-]formation prevailing wind belts." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46577/
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20410/
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the auction of the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1975. Identified (facing the crowd in front row) are Mrs. Richard Warren (with arms folded); Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; A.F. (Art) Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore, Auctioneer. The auction took place inside the restored "Little Rock School", Mineral Wells' first public school. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20409/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
[The Crazy Hotel]
This pictures shows the east side of the Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927, and occupies the entire west side of the 400 block of N. Oak Avenue. The Crazy is now [2008] a retirement home. Across N. Oak Avenue (the main street in the picture) and on the right (east) of the Crazy, is the building (with the Community Aerial Cable Company sign) that once housed Stoker Pontiac. It is now [2008] occupied by Bennett's Office Supply. The Grand Theater (originally the Crazy Theater at 400 N. Oak, and now [2008] The Faith Covenant Church) can be seen at the far end of that block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29963/
[The Crazy Water Well--1974]
The original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "cured" her dementia. Although not used for years, the well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29970/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 1 of 21, Dec. 22, 1975]
A fire destroyed the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975. The hotel was located at 109 West Hubbard Street, facing north, before the unfortunate conflagration. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, located in the same block. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20222/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 2 of 21: View South/Southeast ]
The Colonial Hotel was built in 1906 by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store on S. Oak at the back of the hotel. The name of the hotel was changed to The Damron Hotel around 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. A hardware store, hard by, was sold to Mr. Holt's manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel, located at 109 W. Hubbbard Street, along with Davidson Hardware, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Please note the Christmas decoration, symbol of the season, on the telephone pole above the fire truck. The main entrance to the hotel is faintly visible through the dense smoke to the rear of the fire truck. The Crazy Hotel can be seen at the lower left edge of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29903/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 3 of 21: Baker Hotel in Background]
The Damron Hotel (very popular in the resort city of Mineral Wells through the periods of the Roaring Twenties, The Great Depression and World War II) was originally built as The Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J.T. Holt. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store at the back of the hotel facing S. Oak Ave. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron around 1917 in exchange for a ranch, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Mr. Holt sold the hardware store to his manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel and Davidson Hardware burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture of the fire was taken looking east on Hubbard Street. The Baker Hotel in the left middle of the photograph is to the north of most of the smoke. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29902/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 7 of 21: The Parking Lot Behind the Hotel]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas Season. The Damron was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire was covered extensively by free-lance photographers. The hotel was formerly located on at 109 W. Hubbard Street, on the corner of the block that included SW 1st Avenue and SW 1st Street. This picture was taken during the later stages of the fire, and shows the gutted rear of the hotel, with huge flames still burning in the front portion of the building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29898/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 8 of 21: An Early Stage of the Fire, Looking North]
This view of the spectacular holiday [Christmas] fire that consumed the Damron Hotel completely on December 22, 1975, was taken from SW 1st Street at the southwest corner of the block in the early stages of the fire. The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife. She adamantly refused to live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when it was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29897/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 10 of 21]
Another in the extensive series of photographs that covered the spectacular holiday fire that completely consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas season. This picture shows some of the early response to the fire. Note, for example, the electrical utility truck, which has arrived to cut off electrical power to the buildings. The Damron Hotel (which was built during the days when Mineral Wells was a resort) was originally named the Colonial Hotel. It was built in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. The sign "Pemberton Appliance and Plumbing", located across the street west, is visible. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29895/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 16 of 21: Black Smoke Billowing Over Businesses]
Shown here is another view of the huge column of black smoke accompanying the Damron Hotel fire that completely destroyed the hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The popular hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in 1917 for a ranch, and its name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, and the spectacular fire that destroyed it received extensive photographic coverage. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29889/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 18 of 21: Individual in Front of the Burning Hotel]
The Damron Hotel, built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was built by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country. It was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917 and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Shown here is another view of the front entrance to the hotel as flames burst through the front wall of the building. The gesturing individual with the hard hat has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29887/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 19 of 21, Two People Looking South from North]
The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the heyday of Mineral Wells as a popular resort city. Mr. J. T. Holt built it for his second wife, because she insisted that she would not live in the country. It was traded in 1917 for a ranch to Agnew and Bessie Damron, and the name of the hotel was changed to reflect the new ownership. It burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture shows the front entrance under a dark plume of black smoke, with flames breaking through the upper floors of the front wall. Two people (one with a hard hat, and one without)stand observing the proceedings. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29886/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20302/
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 21 of 21: An Early Stage, Looking East, Smoke Billowing]
Here is a view of the Damron Hotel (formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street)during the early stages of the fire (on December 22, 1975) that completely destroyed it. Built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife, and traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a popular hotel during the heyday of Mineral Wells--through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29885/
[Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Mounument: Sen. Tom Creighton Speaks]
Texas State Senator Tom Creighton delivers the keynote address at the dedication of a memorial marker to W.P. (Bill) Cameron at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. Mr. Cameron was the Editor of the Mineral Wells Index newspaper, and an active and popular participant in local civic and social events. After his death, his family placed a marker in his honor at the museum. Members of Mr. Cameron's family are seated to the speaker's left, and the Junior High Ensamble, Director Vicki Carden, are on the museum steps behind and to the speaker's right, Please contact the collection webmaster if you recognize other persons in the picture. The marker has been removed, and its location iss not known at this time.[see previous photographs for more details.] Very dimly visible in an enlarged photo, inside the open door of the museum, is an original five-pointedwooden star that decorated a gable of the historic Hexagon House Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29868/
First National Bank
The first National Bank, at the SE corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20423/
Fog
This booklet gives an overview of fog as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Types of fog and factors for formation and dissipation; flight procedures when fog has been forecasted or encountered en route"; and the en-route weather aids available to the aviator." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46571/
Frontal Weather
This booklet gives an overview of frontal weather as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes a "Discussion of frontal weather systems to include identification, characteristics and flight techniques to be used when penetrating a given frontal system." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46579/
Icing
This booklet gives an overview of icing as it relates to aviation. It includes information on "Three types of icing and associated cloud formations and temperatures" as well as "Hazards and flight procedures in icing", according to the scope notes on the title page. The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46570/
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29917/
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46559/
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [], No. [], Ed. 1 Monday, October 2, 1972
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477386/
Mineral Wells Reporter (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 6, No. 46, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 16, 1978
Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth476673/
Moisture and Clouds
This booklet gives an overview of moisture and cloud formations as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Cloud formation, international classification, abbreviations, and symbols" as well as "General flight conditions associated with stratiform and cumuliform clouds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46580/
Mountain Circulation
This booklet gives an overview of mountain circulation as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information to "Identify mountain circulation patterns, flight hazards, and recommended flight procedures for mountainous operations." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46572/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 9, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 11, 1974
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417293/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 71, Ed. 1 Thursday, October 9, 1975
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417292/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 82, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 25, 1975
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417315/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 102, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 13, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417314/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 103, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 20, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417297/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 110, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 8, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417305/
Palo Pinto Advance-Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 120, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 16, 1976
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417308/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [20], Ed. 1 Thursday, November 16, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417296/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [23], Ed. 1 Thursday, December 7, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417309/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [102], No. [24], Ed. 1 Thursday, December 14, 1978
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417316/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 44, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 19, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417301/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 47, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 10, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417306/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 57, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 12, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417311/
Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 102, No. 71, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 20, 1979
A weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth417290/
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (sixth)]
A panorama, taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16240/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 1 of 15: Will Poston]
Will Poston is shown standing in the cashier's station of his department store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Note the conveyor system by which the cashier received cash and statements from various departments, and distributed change and receipts. Central cashiers were common in department stores from the years of the Great Depression through the time of World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29959/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 2 of 15: Will Poston Inside His Store]
Will Poston stands at the cashier's station, preparing to dispatch a runner to a clerk in his store, Poston Dry Goods, It was located at 107 N. Oak Avenue in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29957/
[Poston's Dry Goods - 3 of 15: Will Poston Inside Cashier Station]
Will Poston, seated at the cashier's station in his store, Poston Dry Goods, located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29954/
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