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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 County: Palo Pinto County, TX
 Language: English
[The Hexagon Hotel - drawing]

[The Hexagon Hotel - drawing]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A photograph of a painting of the Hexagon Hotel is shown here. The unique Hexagon Hotel was the subject of many artists and photographers during its existence. Built in 1897 by David Galbraith, inventor of the paper clip, it was the first hotel in Mineral Wells to have electricity in every room. It also had outside exposure in every room for ventilation in the summer. Alvis Lynch, the painter of the picture, was the grandson of Judge Lynch, who founded Mineral Wells. He lived in California, but presented the original painting to the Heritage Association when he visited Mineral Wells. His signature--and the date 1977--is visible on the lower right-hand portion of the photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Hexagon Hotel and Convention Hall]

[The Hexagon Hotel and Convention Hall]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A hexagon-shaped hotel was designed and built by David G. Galbraith, and located in Mineral Wells in the 700 block of N. Oak Street. Construction was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. The hotel was the first electrically-lighted hotel in the city, and the hexagon shape was designed to achieve maximum air circulation 61 years before air-conditioning became available. Mr. Galbraith was also the inventor of the paper clip; and along with five other men, he was the inventor of the synthetic fiber acetate. The hotel was demolished in 1959. The Convention Hall building at 715 N. Oak Street, located next door to the Hexagon Hotel, was built in 1925 on the site of Mineral Well's first electrical generating plant (DC). The Convention Hall was torn down by the city in 1977.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The "Ben Hur"

The "Ben Hur"

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The "Ben Hur" motor car is shown on Mesquite Street (the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue), Mineral Wells, Texas. This new and larger gasoline-powered car joined two "Dinky Cars" (Esther and Susie--named for the daughters of the railroad's co-owner, banker Cicero Smith) on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park and Scenic Railway in 1908. The railway ceased operation in 1909, a year after the larger car was added to the fleet. Mineral Wells was probably one of the few cities in the United States which had gasoline-powered street cars. One of the boys shown standing beside it is Mr. Whatley of automobile fame. This photograph is shown on page 74 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition. The Scenic Railway, on which the "Dinky Cars" operated, was owned by banker Cicero Smith; and Ed Dismuke, owner of the Famous Water Company. It carried passengers every quarter-hour from Mineral Wells around the south flank of West Mountain to the recreation area of Lake Pinto. A 'round trip fare was fifteen cents. Dismuke's Famous Mineral Water wells were located around Lake Pinto, and water was pumped over the mountain to the Famous Water Company and its drinking pavilion. The building on ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Women's  Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells]

[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A women's basketball game (at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells, taken about 1910) is shown in progress here. A "Dancing Pavilion" is visible in the background. Please note the players' uniforms. This scene shows a battle for the rebound after a shot at the basket.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park, 3 of 3]

[The Casino at Elmhurst Park, 3 of 3]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph shows a view of the Casino and gazebo in Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells, Texas. The Park was constructed by the Mineral Wells Electric System (which operated a street-car line from 1907 to 1913). The street-car was the primary transportation from downtown Mineral Wells to the park. As America became enamored with the automobile as a personal vehicle, street-car passenger traffic declined, and the street-cars went out of business for lack of passengers. When the street-cars of Mineral Wells shut down, so did Elmhurst Park. The Casino was the center point of Elmhurst Park, and a popular gaming-house until both the Park and Street-Car Line that transported its customers went out of business in 1913. This image was used in a postcard.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]

[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The entrance to Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells is shown here. The number "7830" in the upper left portion of the picture remains unexplained. The park was a recreational spot for the resort city. The park was closed in 1913, when trolley service was discontinued for lack of customers. As a direct result, the casino no longer exists, being also a casualty of the state's reform of gambling laws. It is now the site of the city sewage disposal facility.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Casino

Casino

Date: 1907/1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: A Casino at Elmhurst Park was located in southwest Mineral Wells, Texas, at the turn of the twentieth century. The structure was a large stucco building facing Elmhurst Lake (created by a dam on Pollard Creek) in the foreground. The lake was sometimes referred to as "Pollard Lake." Elmhurst Park was served by the Mineral Wells Electric Railroad (Street Car), with whom it seemed to have had a symbiotic relationship; both came into existence about 1903, and both went out of business about 1913.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Remember the Good Old Times Back in 1906-1907 [Newspaper Article]

Remember the Good Old Times Back in 1906-1907 [Newspaper Article]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A "Mineral Wells Index" newspaper article, dated 1933, it is titled: "Remember the Good Old Days Back in 1906-1907", showing two views of Elmhurst Park. One view shows an automobile and streetcar at the entrance; and the other shows the casino located in the park, with the lake in the foreground.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907

Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907

Date: 1907
Creator: unknown
Description: Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[North Oak Avenue ]

[North Oak Avenue ]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A street scene in Mineral Wells (looking north on Oak Avenue) approximately at the corner of North Oak Avenue and West Hubbard Street is shown here. Street car (running from 1907 to 1913) tracks are visible in the foreground, and the guy wires required to keep the power wire of the trolley in place festoon the sky. The Hexagon Hotel (opened in 1897)is visible towards the back of the picture. The Vichy (later the Beach, and then later the Standard)well is barely visible across from the Hexagon Hotel. The streets of Mineral Wells were not paved until 1914. Please observe the utter absence of automobiles.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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