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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
[A Charter for the Interurban Road and Street Car Line]

[A Charter for the Interurban Road and Street Car Line]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Mineral Wells Electric System operated two electric street cars in the city of Mineral Wells from 1907 to 1913; one on Hubbard Streeet from NE 17th Avenue to SW 6th Avenue (later part of the Bankhead Highway), and one on Oak Avenue from NE 17th Street to SE 11th Street, thence Southwest to Elmhurst Park. However, two gasoline-powered 70 passenger (all-passenger) motor cars were operated by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMW&NW) between Graford, Mineral Wells, Ft. Worth and Dallas from 1912 to 1935. An electric interurban line was not built. The second part of this notice--the Army-Navy Sanitarium--was never approved by Congress.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Ground-breaking for the Peck City Railroad Depot]

[The Ground-breaking for the Peck City Railroad Depot]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture illustrates a newspaper article (in the Mineral Wells "Index")about the ground-breaking ceremony for the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad depot in Mineral wells, Texas. The G & B V railroad ran from a junction on the Texas & Pacific Railroad main line at Peck City (2 miles west of Millsap) to Mineral Wells. The G&B V depot was on SE Mesquite Street, (now SE 1st Avenue) one block north of the WMW&NW depot. The G&B V contracted to use the WMW&NW tracks from Mineral Wells to the Rock Creek coal mines in far western Parker County, four miles east of Mineral wells. The G&B V ceased operation shortly after the Texas & Pacific Railroad bought the WMW&NW in 1902.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]

[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]

Date: 1907?/1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: A "Major" Beardsley, a Canadian who fought for Maine in the Civil War, (And reported by the Abilene "Daily Reporter" of 1905 to be of Gibstown, Iowa) was granted a franchise to construct a railway street system in 1906. He was also granted a 99-year franchise for the generation and sale of electricity in Mineral Wells. He also bought about 600 acres of land, and established three additions: Lowe Place addition, Lawn Place, Lawn Terrace, and Elmhurst Park, which came to sport a dance pavilion and a Casino. The Beardsley enterprise ended mysteriously with the notice that the workers for his interurban (from Mineral Wells, Peaster, Millsap, and Weatherford) had not been paid. Beasley himself was in New Orleans at the time. Beardsley's trustee, a Mr. W.B. Smith,and the City of Mineral Wells, sued Beardsley's creditors. A judgment awarded Smith the sum of $15,000, and gave the City of Mineral Wells some sixty acres--which included Elmhurst Park. The legal battle continued beyond 1917, when the decision was reversed and remanded by the Court of Civil appeals for Texas. Number 23 trolley car is illustrated here.
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The Fair Grounds and Race Track, Mineral Wells, Texas

The Fair Grounds and Race Track, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: Shown here is a picture of a dirt horse-race track and fair grounds,located southeast of town. It is not known if thoroughbred horses raced, but sulkies are known to have raced here. This course was the first of its kind in Mineral Wells. Another track was constructed at Elmhurst Park, in the southeast part of town, after this one was torn down.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
"Crazy" Water Crystals Plant

"Crazy" Water Crystals Plant

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant was built in 1919. Mineral water was boiled down in the plant, until only the mineral crystals were left. The crystals became an early version of "instant food" when dissolved in water. Radio advertising in the 1930's over the Texas Quality Network, direct from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel, developed a market for the "Crazy Water Crystals" all over the world. This picture of the plant has been computer-enhanced.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
First Car of Shale

First Car of Shale

Date: 1925?
Creator: unknown
Description: "First car of shale" is the legend printed on the original photograph. The car bears the marking "H.M.X. 20" on the rear. The picture probably commemorates the opening of Mineral Wells' fledgling brick manufacturing industry, as the appearance of a gentleman wearing a tie and wielding a shovel suggests a celebration of sorts. His attire shown is typical of summertime 1930's dress. The photograph bears the legend that it was restored by A.F. Weaver.
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[ A Street Scene]

[ A Street Scene]

Date: unknown
Creator: Clarence Winfield Simonds
Description: This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope, are some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) The scene is believed to show some of the large homes on the east slope of West Mountain, in the 600 block of NW 6th Street, taken at about the time of their construction. The home in the foreground appears to be the site of the former Episcopal Parsonage (the church adjoins the parsonage to the north (left of the picture).
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A House in Mineral Wells]

[A House in Mineral Wells]

Date: January 10, 1919
Creator: unknown
Description: Writing on the side of the negative reads: "Vance Villa, Jan. 10, 1919, Mineral Wells." (The 1914 Mineral Wells City Directory lists Vance Villa at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells actually did have a school in the 1890's, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hubbard Street.) This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069) and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. It is postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Some telephone numbers and the remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" also appeared on the envelope.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Mineral Wells (1900)

Mineral Wells (1900)

Date: 1900?
Creator: unknown
Description: This article and photograph from the Weaver Collection appeared in the Mineral Wells Index in the late 1960's--or possibly the early 1970's. The newspaper attributes the photograph to the "Courtesy of Tom Green," and the research to "Bill Cameron." The article states: "This is the way Mineral Wells looked at the turn of the [twentieth] Century. The Scott Livery Stable, foreground, is occupies the area the Whatley Motor Company does today. Across the street at left was the two-story Holmes Hotel. The barn in the corner, in the center of picture, was the T.J. Green Transfer Company. Mat Birdwell, who purchased horses for the government, had his headquarters in the Green barn. Other spots include the Frost Lumber Yard, next to the Green barn; [the] old Baptist Church steeples, top left; [the] Presbyterian Church, top right, that burned 60 years ago."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[An Aerial View of Downtown Mineral Wells in 1954]

[An Aerial View of Downtown Mineral Wells in 1954]

Date: 1954
Creator: unknown
Description: This is a picture of an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells (taken from the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, January 1954)at about South Oak Avenue, and looking north-northeast. Some of the buildings identifiable in the picture no longer exist. The Damron Hotel, at the middle left of the picture, burned in 1975. The Oxford Hotel/First National Bank building, one block east [right] of the Damron, near the center of the picture, burned in 1983. It has been replaced by Lynch Plaza. The Hexagon Hotel, in the upper left corner of the picture, (north and above the Crazy) was demolished in 1959. The Convention Center behind the Hexagon was demolished in 1976. Landmarks still standing are: The 13-story (including a Roof Garden) Baker Hotel, dominating the upper right of the picture; The Crazy Hotel (now [2003] a retirement home) at the upper left of the picture; and the old Post Office in the upper middle of the picture (between the Baker and Crazy Hotels), which now [2003] houses the Woman's Club. The building across the street and to the south (this side of the Baker) was demolished to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, which in turn was replaced ...
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