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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
Crazy Hotel: Formal Opening Menu
This photograph shows a SOUVENIR MENU on the occasion of the formal opening of the Crazy Hotel on March 11, 1927. The hotel, now [2008] a retirement hotel, is still located on the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NW 3rd Street, Mineral Wells, Texas. It was closed as a retirement hotel, under a considerable cloud, in 2012. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38088/
[A Mineral Wells Water Cartoon]
Graphic representation of the combined effects of four common mineral concentrations of blended mineral water produced in Mineral Wells, Texas; it shows four bottles spouting water that form a stream of "Health and Happiness" to repel a skeleton (labeled "Disease") and other symbols of medicine (crutches, a wheelchair, and "Patent Medicine" Bottle). A flag over the water jugs says "Mineral Wells, the strongest fort in the world." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38075/
[The Mineral Wells Mounted Police]
A copy of a newspaper clipping, the caption identifies members of the Mineral Wells Mounted Police "57 years ago." Identified are: "Uncle Billy Wood" on his white horse (not a member of the force); Bob Pate; Paul Craig; Jim Barrett, probably Chief of Police at the time; Paul Granbury. All are reported to be deceased at time of printing. The picture was furnished to the paper courtesy Mrs. Paul Granbury. The sign on the building at the far left of the picture has been tentatively identified as a Livery Stable. Though the sign is visible, the distance has made its contents extremely obscure. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38082/
Crazy Hotel, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture illustrates a postcard of the Crazy Hotel, taken about 1930, well after the "Crazy" burned in 1925. This is a view of the rebuilt hotel, which opened in 1927. It was considered completely up-to-date, and built with solid masonry interior walls to make it fire-proof. The facility is currently [2008] used as a retirement home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38070/
[The Lions Club Womanless Wedding]
Pictured here is the Lion's Club "Woman-less Wedding", a Community Entertainment Production sponsored by the local Lion's Club as a fund-raiser for local charity, and popular around the 1930's and 1940's. Participants are identified as: Seated; J. B. Courtney (Miss Fortitude), Charles Williams and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Standing; Cary Lodal, Dr. Holder, Bob Joiner, Jess Purvine, Cecil Young, Charlie Johnson and Frank Burney (Mae West). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38076/
[A Centennial Booklet of First Baptist Church]
A booklet of twenty pages, celebrating centennial anniversary of First Baptist Church of Mineral Wells, October 10, 1982, it indicates that the Reverend Bobby E. Moore was pastor at the time. The booklet is paperback and vanilla-colored. The text is in brown sans-serif. The interior text is in script. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38091/
[The Knights of Pythias Band]
This photograph appears on page 187 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." (Second edition, 1988, by A. F. Weaver) with the caption, "Knight of Pythias 212 Band of Mineral Wells". The photograph is labeled "K of P Band -- Guy Woodward, Director, Mineral Wells, Texas." The Knights of Pythias Lodge is now located at 610 SE 14th Street in Mineral Wells, adjacent to the former Kidwell Heights elementary school. The Knights of Pythias has run an orphans' home in Weatherford, Texas since the turn of the twentieth century. Mr. Weaver had been in possession of a Pythian album, from which this picture may have been abstracted. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38077/
We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas
This is a picture that was found in Mr. Weaver's collection, and captioned "We lost our job at Mineral Wells, Texas." This type of advertising was used by most of the drinking pavilions in this popular health resort to tout the beneficial effects of Mineral Wells' waters. There were numerous testimonials attesting the truth of such claims. When the Food and Drug Administration began to enforce the nation's drug laws vigorously in the mid- 1930's, however, there were no rigorous scientific test data to document such claims or to warn of possible side effects that taking the mineral water might bring about. Consequently, this sort of advertising was banned after the 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38081/
"Crazy Hotel Opens"
CRAZY HOTEL OPENS: A program Presented by A.F. Weaver to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association March 10, 1994. [This is the first of ten pages, stapled at upper left-hand corner.] The text was probably computer-generated in 13-point sans-serif script and it is likely that Mr. Weaver began his program with a contemporary newspaper account of the gala opening of the re-built hotel. Certainly the opening of the significant hotel was a red-letter day in the history of Mineral Wells. A photocopy of a souvenir menu was laminated on the back of Mr. Weaver's prepared program.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38087/
[The Vichy Well and Natatorium]
Found on page 66 of A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells, Second Edition", the caption for this photograph reads: "First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later the Beach, and then The Standard Well. It was torn down, and the USO was built during World War II (now [2007] the North Oak Community Center)." For the entertainment of visiting "health seekers", the Standard Pavilion offered a swimming pool, skating rink, dance floor with "name band" visiting musicians, amphitheater, playgrounds with band, children's swings with slide, and a flower garden in addition to its drinking pavilion. The building was home to the Mineral Wells Senior Center for a time. Still known as the Community Center, the building has recently [2007] been leased to the Crazy Water Festival Association, and is slated for renovation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38086/
[A Letter Concerning Mineral Wells High School 1953 Graduation]
A letter is shown here (dated November 27, 2002) from R. B. Shiflet to Bob Bellamy, concerning the Mineral Wells High School graduating classes of 1953 and 1954. It states that the move to the "new" campus occurred during the Christmas holidays of 1953. The letter also describes classroom conditions during this period. Houston School faculty members are mentioned, as well. They included R. B. Shiflet, Mrs. D. R. (Ferne) Hudson and Mrs. Mildred Burnham. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38084/
[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]
A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912. This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of the beneficial minerals inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market. What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38079/
[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]
Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory." The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II. Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells. The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker. The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966. The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38085/
[The Construction of the Post Office]
Written on front of picture is the partial holograph legend: ".ade from the North east ...ner looking Southwest made May the 3rd 1912" It shows the construction of what would eventually be the third Post Office at 201 N.E. 2nd Street. A shear-legs is shown on the extreme left. The workers have clearly stopped work for the taking of the photograph, which is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 150. The building now [2014] houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39177/
[Oden's Drive Inn]
This restaurant and grocery store was once located at 3403 Highway 280 east in Mineral Wells. It is no longer [2012] in existence. The photograph shows 1940's and 1950's cars parked in front. The Odens resided above the business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39193/
The Howard Building
Shown here is the D. M. Howard Building, once located on 101 Southeast 1st Avenue. It was later the J.M. Belcher Furniture Store, and then again the R. & W. Furniture. The building was torn down March 17, 1975 to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings & Loan building, and for a parking lot to serve it. A Piggly-Wiggly grocery store was built to the right. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 123. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39183/
[Fred Estrada, Street Vendor]
Fred Estrada sold hot tamales near the corner of Oak & Hubbard (and in front of what is now [2009] the Mineral Wells Office Supplies) for 75 cents a dozen. He met his end when an automobile ran him over in the mid-1960's. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on" page 182. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39181/
Mineral Wells Drug Store
The Mineral Wells Drug was located at 110 N. Mesquite Avenue about 1910. Charles Pollard was the manager. The date of this picture is unknown, but it is conjectured (from the dress of the people pictured) to have been taken in the early twentieth century. Please note the scant electric lighting. Also note the (working?) brass spittoon in front of the cigar display. Customers, presumably having a light meal, are located in the far back. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39190/
Baker Hotel-Mineral Wells, Texas
A panorama View of the Baker Hotel with all the surrounding buildings is shown here. Note: The general appearance of the city surrounding the hotel suggests strongly that this picture was heavily edited. Perhaps it was taken from a postcard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39159/
[The Firstron Building After a Fire]
The Firstron Building occupied the site of the Oxford Hotel (which burned down)and was itself replaced by the First National Bank (which moved away). The building burned in 1983. Lynch Plaza now [2012] occupies the site. The sign in front of the remains of the Firstron Building reads: Firstron Building OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 325-4461 ROOM 300 It invites ironic comment. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition, on page 186. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39196/
[The Old Post Office]
This picture shows what is now [2101] known as "The Old Post Office Building." A horse, dragging a cart, is seen drinking out of a trough in front of it. The trough is now [2010]located in the Mineral Wells Commons park. The whereabouts of horse is unknown. The building now [2010] houses the Women's club. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 188. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39197/
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39191/
[A Window in the "Texas Carlsbad Water"]
This photograph illustrates one of the painted-glass windows that was installed around 1915 at the Texas Carlsbad Water. It shows a bottle of "#3", extolling its efficacy against "Stomach and Liver Disorders. The Texas Carlsbad Water no longer [in 2012] exists. The picture occurs in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 63. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39228/
[The Smith Memorial at Elmwood Cemetery]
This is a picture of a monument that is to be found in the Elmwood Cemetery. Two Confederate soldiers with rifles (who presumably never went to war) stand at the top of a scrolled pediment that bears the number "32" amidst foliage. Beneath it are crossed sabres. At the very bottom. under the name "Smith", is the motto: "Charity and Humanity Our Religion" in raised letters. This monument may be the grave of the Cicero Smith family. He was the President of Lake View Scenic Railway, also known as the Dinkey Cars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39250/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
Convention Hall
The Convention Hall, built in 1925 to accommodate the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. An ice plant and electric plant built by Galbraith (owner of the Hexagon Hotel) had burned, and the rock foundation was used to build the Convention Hall. Demolition of the building began in 1975. A spokesman for the company tearing down the hall stated that the man who imported the London Bridge to Havasu City, Lake Havasu, Arizona, was interested in purchasing the rock foundation to restore an old fort at the London Bridge facility. This picture is featured in "Mini Edition" of "Time Was..." on page 34. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39233/
The Giant Penny
This photograph appears to have been taken in the Convention Hall. The date is unknown. It shows a display of various items on and around a stage. The sign 'The Giant Penny' features prominently. The occasion that prompted the display and the significance of "The Giant Penny' are now [2010] unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39235/
[A Photographic Miscellany of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is a possible composite picture of the attractions about Mineral Wells. It features a panorama of Camp Wolters, dated 1941; A scenic drive, Mineral Wells; the hospital & headquarters Areas; Regimental Areas 4 & 5, Camp Wolters. Several small towns(e.g. Salesville, Graford, and Santo) are shown as existing--but nothing more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39206/
"CRAZY" WATER CRYSTALS PLANT
This photo shows an easterly view of the "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant, the Water Tower, and Crazy Water train cars on the train track adjacent to the Plant. Mineral Wells, Texas texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39224/
[The Crazy Laundry]
In the 1930's, the Carlsbad Building (once a spa for taking the mineral waters. See "The Texas Carlsbad" for details)was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for use as a laundry. Note the painted windows that still proclaim the waters, and the original Texas Carlsbad building. The Panel truck in front was driven by L. C. Ely and the other truck was driven by his father R. C. Ely. This picture was taken sometime in 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39226/
[The Crazy Box Factory Crew 1940]
A. F. Weaver, Sr. (seated on the left) raised money--just before World War II--to build the new building just behind the Crazy Box Factory. He is pictured here with the staff of the building. The Polluck Paper and Box Company took over the plant right after the war. It later became the St. Regis Packaging. The photograph dates to 1940. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39221/
Famous Mineral Water "At the Sign on of the Old Well"
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39260/
[The Burning of the First Crazy Hotel]
The first Crazy Hotel burned in 1925. This photograph shows the fire as it is burning out, and only a few pieces of the structure still stand. The sign seen in the left part of the photo says "Crazy Drug Co." which was the pharmacy inside the hotel. The hotel was rebuilt and claims to be fire proof. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39218/
The Raines Building, Mineral Wells
The Raines Building located at 101 N.E. 1st Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas, was once a drug store, then a department store, later Pemberton's Appliance Store; in 1975 it was Calhoun Furniture Company and in 2008 is the home of Downtown Video. This photograph is found on page 126 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. Note the clothing of the people, the absence of any traffic, and the bunting on the building. A legend in white ink on the lower left-hand corner of the photograph reads: Texas Trade Review." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39216/
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
Lion's Club Womanless Wedding [Around the 1930's or '40's] A note tacked to the bottom of the picture reads: LEFT TO RIGHT: LIONS Conrad Brady Clyde Murray Alton Pope George Ritchie Al Frances Burl Lawrence Charles Garland One "lady" [Conrad Brady] wears the banner "Miss Conduct"; another, [Alton Pope]the banner "Miss Judge." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39245/
[A Letter from Texas Governor to D.C. Harris]
James V. Allred, then governor of Texas wrote, on July 14, 1938, to D.C. Harris a charming response to a letter Mr. Harris had sent to him. The original letter, that prompted this reply, has not survived to this day [2010]. Mr.Allred's letter is reproduced here for the benefit of the curious. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39251/
[A View of Mineral Wells, Before the Building of the Baker Hotel]
A view of Mineral Wells from West Mountain, taken before the Baker Hotel was built. The picture therefore predates 1929. Just to the left of the upper center is the Hexagon Hotel. To the right of that, almost at the upper center, is the Standard Well and Amusement Park. On top of the hill are homes on what is now Northeast 4th Avenue. Some of these houses (especially the one with columns) are still in existence today [2009]. At the southern base of the hill, the house which Mr. Pratt restored in 2006-7 can be seen next to the Sanatorium. The Hexagon Hotel and the Standard Well no longer exist. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20452/
[The Grande Courts]
A tourist court, built about 1930 by Charlie E. Turner, Harold Dennis, and Clarence Hunt is depicted here. It was located in the 1000 block of West Hubbard Street. Grande [pronounced "Grand-dee"--at least in Mineral Wells] Courts was a national chain of franchise motels. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 99. The sign reads "Grande Courts Tourist Apts." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20429/
The Crazy Theatre
The Crazy Theater was located at 400 North Oak Avenue, on the east side of the street opposite the Crazy Hotel. The sign reads: "Week Commencing Monday June 22." The street does not appear to be paved, which dates the picture prior to 1914. Bennett's Office Supply now [2013] occupies the site of the former theater. The theater features in A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 17. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20439/
[Looking South on Mesquite Street]
A photograph that looks south on Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue)is shown here. It was taken after 1914, as the pavement indicates. Several automobiles and a horse-drawn buggy share the street. Note the water fountain between cars in right-center foreground. This water fountain was later moved to Mineral Wells' West City Park, and is now in the "Towne Common", located in the 100 block of SW 1st Avenue. The picture may be found on page 79 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS . . . " Mini Edition, 2004. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20435/
[A Mini-Park]
The women of Mineral Wells beautified the town by planting vacant lots. This "Mini-park" was located in the 200 block of Hubbard Street, and is now [2008]a parking lot adjacent to Murray's Grill. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20464/
[The Yeager Block]
This picture shows a white sandstone building on NE 1st Avenue named "Yeager Block." The original home of (what was often called) the Lion Drugstore, it once sported a metal statue of a lion mounted on the roof, which gave rise to the legend that the business was called "The Lion Drug." (Current living descendants of Dr. Yeager do not ever remember the drugstore being referred to by than name. However, a casual reference to it in 1912 refers to the store as "The Lion Drug.") It housed the Baker Medical Supply at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back of the photograph gives the year as "1993." The coffee shop "H2J0" is located [in 2007] where "The Rural Route" used to be. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20433/
Co-Operative Market
This photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "Time Was...", second Edition, on page 189. The Co-operative Market was located on the lot in the 200 block of S. Oak Street, where the present [2010] Fire and Police Departments are located. The sign indicates that women and girls were the market's anticipated customers. The street is paved and curbed, so the photograph was taken sometime after city streets were paved in 1914. The facade of a building behind the CO-OP sign bears a "City Feed Market" - "Hay, Oats, Corn . . ." legend. Note the contemporary automobiles in the foreground. The one on the left (edge of picture) appears to be a WHIPPET touring car. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20447/
[A Float in a Parade]
A float, sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce, in a 1938 parade is shown here. Please note the businesses in view: City Bakery, and Perry Brothers 5-10-and 25-Cent [store]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20451/
[The TIME WAS Book Auction]
The auction of first edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." The men in picture were: (left to right) the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Art Weaver, author; H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, Mayor of Mineral Wells; and Frost Bowman, Banker. The Reverend Mr. Moore was pastor of the First Baptist Church at the time. Mr. Weaver was a photographer, and the first president of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Dr. Zappe was a dentist, and Mr. Bowman was a Director of Mineral Wells Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20412/
Texas & Pacific [Bus]
This is a photograph of the bus that conveyed passengers that got off the Texas & Pacific's "Sunshine Special" in Millsap to their destination in Mineral Werlls. This picture was taken in 1940. Information about this picture is taken from Arthur Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", page 96. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20434/
[A Mineral Wells Orchestra]
Shown here is a clipping from a newspaper, showing the Mineral Wells Orchestra, some 65 years previous to its publication. Members are, top row: John Nance, Jeff Reimar, John (last name unknown) and an unidentified mandolin player; middle row is a string guitar quartet consisting of: Mrs. J.E. Johnson, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. P. E. Bock, and an unidentified fourth lady; front row: Mrs. J.D. Cranford, John Muns, an unidentified person (perhaps a trombonist), and Mrs. I. N. Wynn. The clipping was cut short; some information is clearly be missing. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20455/
[A Street Scene, Taken About the 1930's]
This photograph illustrates the "New" Crazy Hotel on North Oak Avenue, which opened in 1927 after the earlier hotel burned March 15, 1925. Many automobiles typical of the period can be seen on the street. Note the following businesses: Tom Moore, Barber Shop, Cafe, Young's Studio, Bath House, Crazy Drug. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20448/
Casino
This photograph may be found on page 87 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. He identifies it as "The Casino and Fiddler's Bandstand at Elmhurst Park." The park was southwest of Mineral Wells. Some of the photograph appears to have been re-touched. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20401/
Mesquite Street North From Throckmorton Street
A postcard of Mesquite Street, taken from Throckmorton Street [In 2008: NE 1st Avenue from NE 1st Street] Note the Post Office, completed August 1913, at end of the newly-paved street. The trolley tracks were removed in 1913, the street paved, and sidewalks installed in 1914. The street names were changed in 1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20442/
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