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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 21 of 21: An Early Stage, Looking East, Smoke Billowing]
Here is a view of the Damron Hotel (formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street)during the early stages of the fire (on December 22, 1975) that completely destroyed it. Built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife, and traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. It was a popular hotel during the heyday of Mineral Wells--through the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29885/
[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]
Spectators are shown here, at a spring play-day frolic at Elmhurst Park around 1910. The popular park once boasted a Casino, a Dancing Pavilion, Exhibit Halls, and Outdoor Sports Fields. It hosted the County Fair and sports events until 1913. On the closure of Elmhurst Park, the City of Mineral Wells became the owner of the property. It was used for a housing development during World War II to accommodate families of soldiers and civilian workers at Camp Wolters. The City of Mineral Wells built city's water treatment facilities on the site of the former park after World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29834/
Daniel Photo 1907
Shown is a group of seven women (riding "sidesaddle" as was the fashion for women at the time), two men and a boy, all riding donkeys. A handwritten note on the photograph's mat identifies it as: "Daniel Photo 1907." The identities of the people are unknown, but the caption suggests this could have been a Daniel family outing. Riding donkeys over the "mountains" of Mineral Wells was a popular pastime of the day. The picture appears to have been taken atop East Mountain in Mineral Wells, which was a popular destination. Souvenir photographs of of the donkey trails survive from the early days. [There was a Daniel's Studio located in the 200 block of N. Oak Avenue in the early days of Mineral Wells, and this photograph is likely to have come from that collection. In which case, the group shown here could have been unrelated.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24997/
Davis Bath House Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of the allurements to be found at the Davis Bath House is shown here. This building was used for the Buckhead Bath House at one time, and then used for the Davis Bath House. The building is located in the 200 block of N. Oak Avenue. Still in existence, it is under renovation as of 2010. This photograph appears on page 52 of the Mini Edition, "Time Was in Mineral Wells..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20285/
The Davis Wells; The Davis Baths
Pictured here is a semi-ornate brick building (with a socle presumably of stone), advertising the Davis Wells and the Davis Baths. This enterprise is not listed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." The picture appears to have been excerpted from a larger photograph, as the legend "Davis Baths" (not visible in the picture) appears on the negative. Polk's Directory for 1920 lists "Davis Mineral Baths" (proprietor, Dr. Eldred A.--the "A" stands for "Albany"--Davis) at "210 1/2 N. Oak Avenue." The business cannot be found in the 1909 or 1914 Polk's Directories. However, the 1914 Polk's Directory shows a Dr. Davis as living at 514 East Throckmorton [presently, in 2014, NE 1st Street] with his wife, Helen. The name of the bath house was changed to the "Buck Head" (or "Buckhead", as some sources have it) at some as yet unknown date. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60884/
[Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Mounument: Sen. Tom Creighton Speaks]
Texas State Senator Tom Creighton delivers the keynote address at the dedication of a memorial marker to W.P. (Bill) Cameron at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. Mr. Cameron was the Editor of the Mineral Wells Index newspaper, and an active and popular participant in local civic and social events. After his death, his family placed a marker in his honor at the museum. Members of Mr. Cameron's family are seated to the speaker's left, and the Junior High Ensamble, Director Vicki Carden, are on the museum steps behind and to the speaker's right, Please contact the collection webmaster if you recognize other persons in the picture. The marker has been removed, and its location iss not known at this time.[see previous photographs for more details.] Very dimly visible in an enlarged photo, inside the open door of the museum, is an original five-pointedwooden star that decorated a gable of the historic Hexagon House Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29868/
Delaware Hotel
The Delaware Hotel, at 316 N. Oak Avenue, is shown here in its glory days. Formerly named "The St. Nicholas Hotel", the Delaware was destroyed by fire. This photograph has been restored. It appears in its original form (as the St. Nicholas) in picture AWO_0564N [St. Nicholas Hotel]. The current picture was "modified" with the name changes (to the Delaware) on signs and re-named at the bottom of the picture. At the time it became the Delaware, this was probably the best picture of the structure. (Subsequent adjacent buildings and power lines interfered with the view). The Chautauqua Theater is identifiable at the immediate left and behind the hotel. This version of the picture is on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20340/
[The Delaware Hotel Fire]
The Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas), at the corner of NE 3rd Street and N. Oak Avenue, is shown in the process of burning down. Also pictured is the Brazos Valley Land Company advertising FARMS RANCHES and CITY PROPERTY. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20288/
[The Delaware Hotel on fire]
The destruction of the Delaware Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The hotel was located at the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NE 3rd St. The fire was fought by horse-drawn fire wagons and a pumper. Trolley rails visible in middle of unpaved street date the picture as being between 1907, when the street car began operations, and 1914 when the street was paved. A partly obliterated legend on the photograph declares that it was taken by "Ellis." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16277/
[Dismuke's Famous Mineral Crystals Label]
One of the by-products of the water which made Mineral Wells famous was mineral crystals, which were shipped all over the world. Purchasers could dissolve the crystals in tap water and (reportedly) receive the same benefits from the reconstituted water as from the well water. The Famous Water Company and the Famous Crystal Company were founded by Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco who came to Mineral Wells for his health. The Famous Water Company is still in operation (under different ownership) and it is the only mineral water company in Mineral Wells at this time. Ed Dismuke is buried in Elmwood Cemetery. He died in 1957 at the age of 97. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24972/
[A District Baptist Meeting]
This is a picture taken by A.F. Weaver during the District Baptist Meeting of 1964, held at the high school football stadium on the west side of town. Miller Stadium, where this photograph was taken, has been replaced by a new one at the High School complex on the east side of town as of March, 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29976/
[A Donkey on 6th Street Mineral Wells, 1916]
Donkeys were still prevalent in 1916, and so were the grass-grown steel tracks of the "Dinky Cars" (Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway which had ceased operations in 1909) on NW 6th Street. The house to the left is an example of the architecture of this time. The source of the photograph is A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." first edition, 1975, on page 82. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24998/
[Downtown Mineral Wells: 1 of 3]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells was taken looking north on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) from SE 1st Street (US Highway 180 E). The visible buildings are: (on the left), Hill's Ladies' Apparel, Cole's House of Flowers, (at the intersecting street, [Hubbard Street--US Hwy. 180 W]), and George's Men's Store. Lynch Plaza and a parking lot are on the right, with the Texas Historical Commission marker on the wall in the lower right-hand corner commemorating the first mineral-water well in the City. In the background, the First State Bank can also be seen (also on the intersecting Hubbard Street, US Highway 180 W.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29839/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 2 of 3: A Different View]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells shows (left to right): Hill's Ladies' Apparel; Cole's House of flowers; (Intersecting street): George's Man's Shop; the Professional Building (formerly the Texas Theater); Poston's Dry Goods;Palace Saloon; Marsden's Shoe Store (former Gem theater). The Crazy Hotel is visible in the background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29838/
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 3 of 3: The 100 Block]
This photograph shows downtown Mineral Wells. The dominant building is Mineral Wells Office Supply (formerly Lattner Funeral Home), followed by R.P.'s Western Outlet; next door: Jann's Boutique; next, Jann's Fashions. Next is Hill's Style Shoppe. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29837/
[Dry Cleaning Bag from Baker Hotel]
A dry-cleaning bag from the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The bag has an image of the hotel, taken from the front, as well as "The Baker Hotel - Mineral Wells, Texas, World Famous Health Resort". Further information on this artifact has not been forthcoming. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16325/
Dry Goods--W.H.H.Hightower
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60912/
DUPLICATE OF The Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16178/
[Dust-proof, Round Windows of Motor Chair Car]
An interior view of a McKeen motor car, called by the locals "Doodle Bug", showing its dust-proof, round windows. Two of these 70-foot, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, 81-passenger motor cars made a round trip daily from Graford, Texas, through Mineral Wells to Dallas from June 11,1912 to April 23, 1929. They were joined March 27, 1913 by a similar coach on the Gulf Texas & Western (GT&W) line that ran from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro to Salesville where it traveled over the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells,& Northwestern) rails through Mineral Wells and on to Dallas. This picture is on page 93 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", First Edition, 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20366/
[An E-mail Dated 3/9/'99 to A. F. Weaver from Dr. Meyer, of Texas A&M]
An e-mail to A.F. Weaver, concerning Ike Sablosky, written by Greg Meyer of Texas A & M, March 9, 1999. Mr. Weaver apparently had inquired about Mr. Sablosky in connection with a photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29809/
[An Early Car at the Crazy Well Flats]
Frank Richards (The driver, identified as "Dad") sits in a Thomas Flyer, parked at the Crazy Pavilion, in late October (or early November) of 1909. Dust on the car, extra spare tires, and a sign on the spares, indicate they have been involved in a "Pathfinder Endurance" run (from Fort Worth to San Angelo) for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The driver and passenger are dressed in typical "duster" clothing for cross-country travel. Frank Richards went on to maintain a successful Abstract company in Mineral Wells. His father, Thomas Richards, had the Star Wells Company in Mineral Wells. A cigar sign in the window suggests this was the drug store, then located in the southeast corner of the Crazy Flats. A sign on the hotel also advertises rooms for rent in addition to its being a mineral water drinking pavilion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25082/
[An Early Delivery Truck]
An early delivery truck, whose wording (on the side reads) "R.O. Norman, Tailor, Cleaning & Pressing, phone 514", is shown here. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20454/
[An Early Panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas: 1882]
This photograph is an early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken approximately in 1882) from East Mountain, looking Southwest. Numbers on the photograph represent specific locations: 1. Judge Lynch's cabin, location of the first mineral water well; 2. N E 1st Avenue (second water well dug); 3. Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street; 4. Present location of the Fire and Police Station; 5. South Oak Avenue; 6. The Commercial Hotel (present location of the Gas Co.) 7. NE 1st Avenue business district; 8. North Oak Avenue. Note: The picture identifies number 6 as "The Commercial Hotel", but that hotel has been determined to have been located on South Oak Avenue. The hotel shown in the picture was the Early-Southern Hotel, which an 1893 guidebook clearly states was on Hubbard Street. The guidebook goes on to give the hotel's further location as "[O]n the same block with the post-office [sic]and three blocks from the depot." A Mr. Early is named as the proprietor. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20218/
[An Early Street Scene in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the corner of Mesquite and Coke Streets (Now [2008] NE 1st Avenue and NE 2nd Street) The picture was taken in 1912 after the Ben Hur motor car had stopped running (note its tracks). The Whatley Motor Company is now located where the Livery Stable was on the left at the time of the picture. The "Old Post Office" replaced the buildings on the right, and the Chautauqua was the large white building a block further up the street at the center. Information about this photograph was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", on page 82. The the former Coke Street is labeled "Moore Street" (which was actually four blocks further north). The picture dates to 1905 when the "Dinky" car operation began and the Chautauqua was constructed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20425/
[An Early View of Mesquite Street]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60916/
[An Early View of Mineral Wells, Left Portion]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells, looking from the South Mountain to the northeast is shown here. Note: The Hexagon House (middle upper right), First Baptist Church (two white spires in middle right), Chautauqua (far upper right), West Ward School (large building at left middle with "Little Rock School" immediately to this side). [This is the left portion of a contiguous pair of pictures that make up this view. The right portion of the photograph is shown following.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16212/
[An Early View of Mineral Wells: Right Portion]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells from South Mountain looking northeast, this picture gives the other side of a photograph, which, with the preceding, comprise one picture. The Exchange Hotel (upper left of the picture below East Mountain, with Dr. Thompson's home to its immediate right is visible) This is approximately the northeast edge of the City Business District, but other landmarks cannot be identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16211/
[Ellis White Shows Off the Book About Mineral Wells]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60905/
Elmhurst Park
This illustration appears to be a picture postcard of the entrance to Elmhurst Park, an amusement park on Pollard Creek, about five miles southwest of Mineral Wells. The park operated from 1907 to 1913, and was a major attraction in "the nation's most popular health spa" at that time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20326/
[An Engraving of a Crowd of Men]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60964/
[The Entrance to Camp Wolters]
Found on page 158 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" by A. F. Weaver, the caption to this picture reads, "Entrance to the original Camp Wolters around the 1930's. This entrance was located near and behind the present National Guard Armory." The Texas National Guard 112th Cavalry Service Troop maintained an armory on West Mountain, from a time before 1923. The hill itself was dubbed "Cavalry Hill." The Service Troop was later re-named 124th Cavalry, Troop F--which attained to fame as part of the task force that cleared the Burma Road in World War II. Camp Wolters was built for summer training of the Texas National Guard in 1927. It was to be used for a minimum of three weeks each year. The famous CCC (The Civilian Conservation Corps) stayed in the camp in 1930, and built several of the rock structures in the camp--and also around Mineral Wells. The original site had sen many uses: It was a P.O.W. camp for German prisoners taken during World War II; it was Texas National Guard property; and it was later given over to commercial use. An embedded star that was once on the headquarters of the parade ground of the original camp (now on the propery of Mineral Wells High School) is still visited by those who were stationed there--and by those World War II prisoners who were interned in Mineral Wells. The Texas Historical Commission recognizes its significance with a marker. The "new" Camp Wolters was located farther east in 1941. It has also had many uses: The U.S. Army IRTC; (Infantry Replacement Training Center) in World War II; Wolters Air Force Base in the early 1950's. It was returned to the army in 1956, and re-named Fort Wolters in 1963. It was the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School (USAPHS)during the Vietnam War in 1966. The entrance to the original Camp Wolters was constructed of native sandstone with red-clay-tile roofs. Part of the property was distributed to Mineral Wells and Weatherford after Fort Wolters was decommissioned following the Vietnam War. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38085/
Exchange Hotel
[The] Exchange Hotel (also known as [The]Plateau in 1909, and later as the Hospital) was built on he site of the Cliff House, which was destroyed by fire. The house to the right was built in 1896 by Dr. A. W. Thompson as a wedding present for his second wife. The Mineral Wells Post Office was built on the vacant lot at the left of the hotel in 1912. The Mineral Wells City Directory of 1924 listed the former Exchange/Plateau building as the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. Dr. A.W. Thompson was still living in the house to the right at the time. The Hotel/Hospital was finally demolished. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16183/
Facts about the U. S. Army Replacement Center, Mineral Wells, Texas
This item appears to be about the size of a bookmark. It contains a list of facts and statistics about the facilities and personnel at Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46562/
The Fair Grounds and Race Track, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a picture of a dirt horse-race track and fair grounds,located southeast of town. It is not known if thoroughbred horses raced, but sulkies are known to have raced here. This course was the first of its kind in Mineral Wells. Another track was constructed at Elmhurst Park, in the southeast part of town, after this one was torn down. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20364/
Fairfield Inn
The Fairfield Inn, built by Col. Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was a very popular rooming and boarding house in the early days of Mineral Wells. It was located at 814 North Oak Street, across Oak Street and one block north of the contemporary Hexagon Hotel. Part of the retaining wall shown in the picture still exists. Mr. Boykin built his home at 1501 SE 4th Avenue. The home was later sold to William Whipple Johnson, who operated the Rock Creek coal mines in eastern Parker County around 1910. Mr. Johnson, with his brother Harvey, had previously opened the coal mines at Thurber on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line in 1908. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16206/
Fairfield Inn, Mineral Wells, Tex
Shown here is a an extensively damaged and repaired postcard of the Fairfield Inn. The inn, built by Colonel Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was located at 814 N. Oak Avenue and faced west. The postcard is addressed to A. J. Ryder, Mallory Docks, Galveston, Texas. The postmark it bears dates to 1911. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20341/
Famous Mineral Water
The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24958/
Famous Mineral Water "At the Sign on of the Old Well"
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39260/
The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel
The Famous Water Wells maintained a pavilion in the lobby of the Damron Hotel, where guests could partake of mineral water. This hotel was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and SW 1st Street. It burned down in 1975. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20310/
Famous Well
This picture is taken from a series of 17 (4X4) negatives that were enclosed in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma: 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. The photographs were taken January 11, 1919. Also written on the envelope were some telephone numbers and the following: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)." The rock building housing the original well was located on Lake Pinto, across West Mountain from the City of Mineral Wells. Mineral water was piped to the Famous drinking pavilion. The Famous Water Company is still [2007] in operation at 215 NW 6th Street, vending "crazy" mineral water, deep-well water, and drinking water filtered by reverse-osmosis. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20381/
The Fiftieth Reunion of the Graduating Class of 1934
This picture reproduces a newspaper clipping that reports the fiftieth reunion of the 1934 class from Mineral Wells High School. It was published in the Mineral Wells Index on June 28, 1984. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16344/
The Final page of the Minutes of the Bicentennial Committee, 1975
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60938/
[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]
This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29830/
[Firing and Deflection Conversion Tables]
This document (FT 81 B3, abridged) consists of two pages, each with a separate table. The first table is a chart that shows range and elevation for firing particular mortar shells. The second page includes a chart with range and deflection (presumably for the same kind of shells), as well as notes which give additional instructions. The significance of the notation "CW 41-46 (11)" in the upper right-hand corner remains unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46561/
The First Anniversary of the Aviation Engineer Force Activation
Troops and spectators celebrate the first anniversary of Aviation Engineer Force Activation at Wolters Air Force Base on April 10, 1952, with Colonel A.B. Campfield, the Commander of Troops; Brigadier General H.W. Ehrgott, Commanding; Colonel Philip G. Kemp, the Base Commander. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16324/
[The First Boy Scouts in Mineral Wells, 1902]
A note on back of this photograph states, "1902, 1st Boy Scouts in Mineral Wells, organized by Frank Creighton (L) met in old Sangcura Sprudel Well Pavilion." The picture was taken in front of Green's Transfer Building. This photograph possibly shows the youth division of a local lodge, probably Shriners. Please note the military-style stripes and guns. This historic photograph captures a precursor to the Boy Scout movement, that started six years later in England. It spread to America in 1910 to generate an interest in outdoor and educational activities among teen-age boys. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25062/
First Car of Shale
"First car of shale" is the legend printed on the original photograph. The car bears the marking "H.M.X. 20" on the rear. The picture probably commemorates the opening of Mineral Wells' fledgling brick manufacturing industry, as the appearance of a gentleman wearing a tie and wielding a shovel suggests a celebration of sorts. His attire shown is typical of summertime 1930's dress. The photograph bears the legend that it was restored by A.F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20363/
[First Christian Church]
On the back of photograph is typed: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY, A. F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVENUE MINERAL WELLS TEXAS DATE JUL 27 1964. First Christian church occupies the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue (the address on the photograph was A.F. Weaver's home.) Some of the limestone used to build the church was donated by latter-day owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie, where the first meeting of the Northwest Texas Cattle Raisers' Association was held in 1876. Oliver Loving's son, J.C. Loving, wrote a letter to northwest Texas ranchers after the meeting, inviting them to meet the following February in Graham, where the Association was organized. C.C. Slaughter, once the richest man in Texas, owned the Rock Pens at the time of the Stock Raisers' meeting. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29978/
[First Christian Church]
Typed on the back photograph is: THIS PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN BY A.F. WEAVER 1901 N. W. 6TH AVE. MINERAL WELLS, TEXAS DATE JUL 27, 1964. It is a view of the limestone church occupying the site of the former Gibson Well Park and Pavilion. Some of the rock used in this church came from owners of the historic Rock Pens on Dillingham Prairie. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29977/
[The First Crazy Hotel]
This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29966/