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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
Baker Hotel-Mineral Wells, Texas
A panorama View of the Baker Hotel with all the surrounding buildings is shown here. Note: The general appearance of the city surrounding the hotel suggests strongly that this picture was heavily edited. Perhaps it was taken from a postcard. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39159/
Bank of Mineral Wells
This picture is an undated photograph that appears to have been published in the Mineral Wells Index. It also appears on page 148 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." The caption reads, "Palo Pinto County Boys' and Girls' Poultry Clubs and the Junior Rotary Band received pure-bred eggs distributed free by the Bank of Mineral Wells. Note the bank has had an addition to its south side." The caption on an earlier picture of the bank states, "D. M. Howard and R. B. Preston opened the first bank in the City, The Bank of Mineral Wells, located at 102 SE 1st Avenue." In a companion picture on p. 148, "TIME WAS ... ", the caption reads,"The Bank of Mineral Wells went broke in 1924. The building was then used by Ball Drug and Massengale's Appliances. The building was torn down to make room for parking in the downtown area." (The City Directory of 1924 lists the bank's location at 102 SE 1st. Avenue. There is no listing of it in the 1927 City Directory.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20440/
The Bank of Mineral Wells
The Bank of Mineral Wells, the first of its kind, was located at 102 SE 1st Avenue. The quality of this picture is parlous: The upper story of the building appears to have been heavily retouched by an unknown hand. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60922/
[Baum-Carlock-Bumgardner Funeral Home Burial Records]
Report containing information pertaining to dead of Mineral Wells, Texas. This includes names, birth dates, dates of death, relations, and location of burial site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477569/
[Baum-Carlock-Bumgardner Funeral Home Burial Records]
Report containing information pertaining to dead of Mineral Wells, Texas. This includes names, birth dates, dates of death, relations, and location of burial site. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth477566/
The "Ben Hur"
The "Ben Hur" motor car is shown on Mesquite Street (the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue), Mineral Wells, Texas. This new and larger gasoline-powered car joined two "Dinky Cars" (Esther and Susie--named for the daughters of the railroad's co-owner, banker Cicero Smith) on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park and Scenic Railway in 1908. The railway ceased operation in 1909, a year after the larger car was added to the fleet. Mineral Wells was probably one of the few cities in the United States which had gasoline-powered street cars. One of the boys shown standing beside it is Mr. Whatley of automobile fame. This photograph is shown on page 74 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition. The Scenic Railway, on which the "Dinky Cars" operated, was owned by banker Cicero Smith; and Ed Dismuke, owner of the Famous Water Company. It carried passengers every quarter-hour from Mineral Wells around the south flank of West Mountain to the recreation area of Lake Pinto. A 'round trip fare was fifteen cents. Dismuke's Famous Mineral Water wells were located around Lake Pinto, and water was pumped over the mountain to the Famous Water Company and its drinking pavilion. The building on the left edge of the picture with the arched windows was M.H. Coleman's Clothing and Shoes for gentlemen. It was later occupied by Wallace Distributing Company. The building still stands diagonally northwest across NE 1st. Avenue from the Baker Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16317/
The Bethesda Bath House
This is a photograph of the Bethesda Bath House was formerly located 406 N. Oak, with the top of the front of Chautauqua (to the northeast of the bath house) visible over the top of the roof's gable at the left side of the building. The Bethesda Bath House apparently contained the office of Dr. G. W. Hubbard. Bathing in the mineral waters was considered a health treatment, and was recommended by local doctors. There is a structure seen behind the bath house in the lower right quadrant of the photograph. This may have been the doctor's residence. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20307/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
The Rotary Club featured a float during "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bi-Centennial) parade in downtown Mineral Wells, on April 4, 1976. It is moving south on Oak Avenue at the intersection of Oak and Hubbard Streets. Riders on the float depict "flappers" and a golfer of the "Roaring Twenties", dancing to jazz music. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16144/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float that appeared, among others, in the "Time was" Bicentennial parade, held on April 4, 1976. It depicts former mineral-water drinking spots in Mineral Wells. Ladies on the float represent customers at some of Mineral Wells' more popular one-time Spas. The wells depicted are: Lynch's discovery-well, the Crazy (Mineral Wells' third and namesake water well), the Gibson Well, the Carlsbad Well, and the Hawthorn Well. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16146/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, with women dressed in period clothing, appeared in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (commemorating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates several historical mineral-water drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, including the Lithia, the Gibson, Lynch's mineral well, the Carlsbad, the Crazy, and the Hawthorne. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16149/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows a celebrity car in the "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) parade, held April 4, 1976. The passengers riding in the back seat of the 1976 Cadillac El Dorado convertible are The Mayor of Mineral Wells, Ellis White, and his wife, Janie. The picture was taken at the intersection of Oak Street (Highway 281) and Hubbard Avenue (Highway 180) in downtown Mineral Wells. The car is moving south on Oak Street, with the Baker Hotel one block east in background. The camera that took the picture is facing east-northeast. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16143/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, depicting the Rock School House in the "Time Was" featured in Bicentennial parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). Built in 1884, it was Mineral Wells' first public school. The float is shown at the corner of Hubbard and North Oak Streets. It was sponsored by the Junior History Club. A sign on the building in the background identifies the Proctor Schneider Insurance Agency. This site was formerly occupied by the First National Bank. The Baker Hotel is in left background. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16142/
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
The Mineral Wells Heritage Association sponsored a float in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates both the publishing of A. F. Weaver's photographic history, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", which was published co-incident with the conversion of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" into a museum, and restoration of the building itself. The ninety-member Mineral Wells Heritage Association was formed to preserve Mineral Wells' first (1884) public school. Mr. Weaver was a director and Charter Member of the Heritage Association, and served as its first President. He was also chairman of the Palo Pinto County Bi-centennial Committee. The parade is pictured going south on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) at the corner of Hubbard Street (US Highway 180). Jeep's "The Thing" automobile is pulling the float. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16147/
[Bill Cameron in Front of Old "Index" Building]
Bill Cameron stands before the old "Index" Building--on Northwest First Avenue (across from the Crazy Water Building). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39254/
The Bimini
The Bimini Mineral Baths, at 112 NW 4th Street, was built by Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, contractors in the early 1900's. The Bimini later became the Wagley Bathhouse. Dr. Wagley was an early pharmacist in Mineral Wells. Please note the utter lack of automobiles, and the horse-drawn vehicle in front of the bath house. The meaning of the white-ink number "1861" remains to be determined. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20234/
The Bimini Bath House
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building" is shown here. It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. It was later demolished. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16181/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells]
An early panoramic view of Mineral Wells is shown here. The picture is a composite of two views taken from East Mountain. Attached to the composite is a date "1901." The large building in the front middle of the picture is the Holloway & Haley livery stable. Some of the buildings are numbered on the photograph. Recognizable are: (2) The Hawthorn Well, with steeple (Right middle of the picture), (4) The original Crazy water drinking pavilion (two-story with smaller upper third floor, right middle of picture), The Lythia Well (between the Crazy Well and the Hawthorn Well), and The Hexagon House at the far right edge of picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20324/
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells
Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16214/
[A Bird's Eye-view of Mountains in the Distance]
Illustrated here is a view of Mineral Wells from the southeast, looking northwest. On the left, the large building in front of the hill is the Chautauqua, built by public subscription in 1905. It was demolished sometime about 1912. The large white building near the edge at the left middle of the picture was the First Baptist Church, which served the congregation from 1900 to 1920. The dim building under the hill at the upper right of the picture is the East Ward School (Mineral Wells' first High School), built in 1906 and closed in 1926. Please note the windmills in the backyards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16218/
[Blind Nellie]
Blind Nellie was brought to Mineral Wells by a cowboy, who sold her at auction for a dollar and a half. She eventually came into the possession of Colonel W.R. Austin, who used her to turn the wheel of the pump at the Austin Well. In that capacity, the horse became a tourist attraction. When she was retired, she continued to walk in circles in her pasture. She was given a ceremonial burial when she died in 1912, a burial attended by a large crowd of admirers. The story may be found on page 54 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." by A.F. Weaver. Written on the back of this photograph is "Blind Nellie at Austin Well located in the 900 block of N.E. 2nd Ave." This is clearly a photograph of a newspaper clipping. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25103/
[Blind Nellie at the Austin Well]
Colonel W. R. Austin came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880, and settled on Staggs Prairie. When an infection in his eye responded to mineral water treatment, he established the Austin Well, later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims. Blind Nellie was a fixture of the Austin Well for years. She had an interesting history: A cowboy rode her into town one day, and auctioned her off to the highest bidder, J.H. Coleman, who bid a dollar and a half for her. Then Bob Kyle took Coleman's bargain off his hands, but Colonel Austin was the one who profited most from her when he devised a method that used her to "pump" water from his well. This unique method of bringing water to the surface was an added attraction at the Austin. Instead of drawing it up by hand or using a power pump, Blind Nellie was trained to walk around in circles, pulling the water up from below. She would pause long enough for the water to empty and, as if on a hidden cue, would go around again as the receptacle was lowered back into the well, repeating her performance accurately each time. In later years, when she became confused in her ritual, she was allowed to retire. In retirement, however, Blind Nellie selected a place in her pasture, and during the working hours of the day she repeated the ritual of walking her circle in a size corresponding to the one she had walked for so many years at the Austin Well. She died in 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24964/
Boating on Pinto Lake, Mineral Wells
This appears to be a photograph of an old postcard entitled "Boating on Pinto Lake, Mineral Wells." It shows a boating party taking a cruise by motor boat, which was an activity enjoyed by many tourists to this area. The picture appeared in the Daily Mineral Wells Index on May 6, 1902, but no date was assigned the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20484/
[A Bottle-Shaped Advertisement ]
This photograph shows an advertisement for the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad in the shape of a bottle of mineral water. In 1912, two gasoline-powered motor cars were added to the WMW&NW rolling stock to provide passenger service to Salesville, Oran, and Graford. The Golf Texas & Western Railroad,(GT&W)--sometimes referred to by locals as "Get your Ticket and Walk"--was built from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro and contracted to operate motor coaches over part of WMW&NW north extension in 1912. The GT&W line joined the WMW&NW Railroad some 12 miles north of Mineral Wells. Although the contract for the use of WMW&NW system was signed February 6, 1912, actual operation over the WMW&NW line did not begin until March 27, 1913. The Gulf Texas and Western operated gasoline powered motor coaches, similar to the ones owned by WMW&NW, through Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Ft. Worth and on to Dallas. A round-trip from Seymour to Dallas was made daily by a 70-passenger gasoline-powered, motor car. Completion of Morris Sheppard Dam and the impounding of Possum Kingdom Lake necessitated abandonment of the Salesville to Graford line (and consequently the entire GT&W line) by August 15, 1936. The reverse side of this Mineral Water advertisement indicates that the building of the railroad was underwritten by Beetham and Sons. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20353/
[A Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]
A bottle-shaped flier is illustrated here, showing the attractions and services in Mineral Wells. Evidently, this is the interior of the flier. See "Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad" for the cover. All hotels, boarding houses, wells, and activities are listed, including fox hunting. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Ad]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25104/
[A Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Advertisement]
A picture of a mineral water advertisement, probably the cover of a flier is shown here. This is an example of the exaggerated claims made about mineral water. It advertises an "unscientific mixture of water, bottled in bond in Mineral Wells by Pleasant Memory, and marketed as "Donkaione." For the (probable) interior of the flier see [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25106/
[A Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]
The interior of a bottle-shaped advertisement for mineral water is shown here. It claims romantic properties for the water. See also [Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad] and [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25105/
[A Bottle-shaped Souvenir Booklet]
Two pages of a souvenir booklet touting the benefits of Mineral Wells, Texas are illustrated here. The shape suggests a bottle of mineral water. Dr. Dan Cupid has abandoned his bow and arrow in favor of mineral water to treat heart conditions. Among his stock of waters prescribed are bottles from the Crazy, Carlsbad, Gibson, and Lamar Wells. There are other pages of this booklet elsewhere in this collection. They could perhaps be placed together in a file at some time in the future. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20250/
[Boyce Ditto's Social Security Card]
An envelope from the Crazy Water Hotel, containing Boyce Ditto's Social Security Card. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16338/
The Brain Busters
Black-face comedy was considered a socially acceptable form of entertainment until after World War II. The pamphlet suggests that "The Brain Busters" were a series of difficult questions sent in to the duo by listeners to their radio program. Further information about "Sugar Cane" and "February" is unfortunately lacking. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60967/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 1, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 13, 1969
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505716/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 2, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 20, 1969
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505711/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 4, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 4, 1969
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505693/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 5, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 11, 1969
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505648/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 6, Ed. 1 Thursday, December 18, 1969
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505740/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 7, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 1, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505703/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 8, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 8, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505599/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 9, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 15, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505710/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 10, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 22, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505735/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 11, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 29, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505614/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505631/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 13, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505744/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505673/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505588/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 16, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505725/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 17, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505746/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 18, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505709/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 19, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505713/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 20, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 2, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505687/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 9, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505584/
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 22, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 16, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth505601/