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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
[Parade at Highways 180 and 281 in Mineral Wells]
The bi-centennial parade, 1976 is shown here in progress. A covered wagon, horses, riders, and parade float are visible in the background. The view is taken from the corner of westbound Hubbard Street, (US Highway 180) at Oak Avenue, (US Highway 281.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16145/
[A Parade in 1925]
A military contingent of the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade is proceeding west in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street. Please note the Mineral Wells Sanatorium in the upper right of the photograph just east of the old Post Office. Please note also the double line of angle-parked automobiles on the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16298/
[A Parade in 1925]
A parade took placed during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce's convention of 1925. The parade is moving west on NE 2nd Street. The Whatley-Maddox Ford-Lincoln Motor Company (festooned with bunting)is shown on the corner with the U.S. Post Office across the street. East of the Post Office is the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16230/
[A Parade in Mineral Wells on North Oak Avenue]
The Chamber of Commerce float, with the Parade Princess, greets visitors in the 1936 Centennial Parade in Mineral Wells,Texas. It is shown proceeding along the 200 block of North Oak Avenue. Businesses in photograph include, (bunting-festooned)Perry Brothers 5- 10- and 25-cent store, City Bakery, and (to the left) part of Duke & Ayers 5- & 10-cent store. Angle-parked automobiles and spectators line the street. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16257/
[A Parade of Automobiles]
A parade of decorated automobiles is shown crossing the intersection at North Oak and NE 2nd Streets,as seen from the west. A sign for Lovera Cigars is visible on the front of the Crazy Drug Company (the gray building at right middle of the picture.) The large white building in the left center back-ground is the Presbyterian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16263/
[A Parade With a Rotary Club float]
The Rotary Club float in Mineral Wells' 1976 Bi-Centennial Parade featured riders, in clothes typifying the period, that represent a "Roaring Twenties" golfer dancing with "Flapper Fannies." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16141/
[Partial Minutes: Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, November 18, 1975]
First page of the minutes of the Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, held in the old Nazareth Hospital in 1975. It includes a list of attendees and a summary of some of the discussion points. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60937/
[A party at the Wann home]
A photograph of a news article describing a party given by Mrs. Chloe Schillings at her home, located on NW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue--across the street and west of the Presbyterian Church. The party included Mrs. M. R. Birdwell, Mrs. S. A. Prostridge, Mrs. B. R. Beeler, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. Elizabeth Cushman, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Mrs. Gus Wicklund, Mrs. Millie Turner, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Mae B. Tiliord, Mrs. E. W. Rogers, Mrs, Vera Lang, Mrs. Ed Oliver, Mrs. F. C. Highsmith and Mrs. Chloe Wann Schillings At the time of the news article, the home, a large Queen Anne-style house, was said to be owned by Mrs. S. H. Smith. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16185/
Pasadena Heights
A July, 1906 plat of "Pasadena Heights, the Home Builders Addition to Mineral Wells, Texas." Developers of the addition were D. M. Howard, (Co-owner of Mineral Wells' first big department store, Howard Brothers), B. R. Strong, and Frank Richards (manager of the Star Well and owner of an early mineral water crystal plant). Street names were changed in 1912. This area came to be facetiously called "Jackass Flats" by locals. The Brazos Mall is currently [2008] located at the bottom of the plat, Wal-Mart, to the east of the plat. Elmwood Cemetery is at the southwest edge of the plat. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20282/
Pat-Ike
An inscription at the bottom of the photograph reads" Pat--Ike." The "Ike" presumably refers to Ike Zablosky, who came from Russia to Philadelphia in 1890. He and his wife, Fanny Jaffee, later moved to Mineral Wells for health reasons where he became involved in the fur-and-hide business. Zablosky once described the northwest part of Palo Pinto County as a "'Possum kingdom"; hence the first flood-control lake on the Brazos River was named Possum Kingdom Lake. (The story is that it was named that by president Franklin Roosevelt himself.) Zabloski sponsored a local baseball team. He bought a Texas League franchise, after he moved to Dallas, when it became available. It was to become Dallas' first professional baseball team. He pioneered the founding of city farm teams, and acted as umpire and coach. The last name of the "Pat" in the photograph is unknown. He was associated with a team known as the White Sox, which held spring training in Mineral Wells in 1911 and again from 1915-1917. This picture is dated 1917. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29810/
[Pediment on the Second Building of the First Presbyterian Church]
This photograph shows the pediment of the south-west entrance to the First Presbyterian Church (This is its third building) at 300 NW 4th Avenue. The acanthus ornaments on top of the pediment (in Classical times, a guard against dripping rain), have no real function. The dentils that line the interior of the pediment are not Classical, nor are the capitals of of the pillars. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25011/
[The Penix Home ]
The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16161/
[The Penix House ]
This home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas) was once owned by William H. Penix, who was a partner in the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He was also vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style of the house is Queen Anne, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual flat-topped tower on the left of the photograph. Such towers were almost always turreted, flat-tops being practically unknown in this style of architecture. It might not be original; but given the general appearance of the house the condition of the tower might be a testimony to the ravages of time. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16162/
[People in a Parade]
A buggy is shown here, filled with people dressed in what appears to be fashions from the 1920's. The buggy wheels are decorated for a parade and the buggy itself has the name "T. J. Green" on it. The location appears to be in front of the Gibson Well in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, now [2008] the location of the First Christian Church. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16295/
[People in an Automobile]
An automobile is shown here, decorated for a parade. The occupants of automobile are obviously dressed for the special occasion. The photograph is a view looking south on Oak Avenue at First Street, in downtown Mineral Wells. The ghostly images in the picture remain unexplained. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16303/
[People in the Front of the Nazareth Hospital]
A group of people, including a priest, three nuns and Mother Superior, standing in front of the Nazareth Hospital. For details about the Nazareth Hospital, please see: "Nazareth Hospital, 25th Anniversary, 1931-1956." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20405/
[People Marching in a Parade]
Shown here is a photograph of people walking south along North Oak Avenue in a street parade, with some individuals playing musical instruments. The prominent building in the middle right of the picture is the former Crazy Theater on the east side of Oak Avenue, across the street from the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16260/
[People Sitting in a car]
This photograph, looking west on East Hubbard at the corner of NE lst Avenue, shows a touring car, with two men in front and three women behind. Please note the trolley car tracks in front of the car. They are almost covered with dirt and no longer in use. This photograph, taken about 1915, may be found on page 137 of Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20421/
[A Period Car]
Three men are shown sitting in a restored "Vintage" car. Razz Ford sits in the back seat. Tom Creighton, in the driver's seat, still wears the beard he grew for Palo Pinto County's 1957 Centennial celebration. Russell Whatley occupies the passenger's seat. The car is making an exit from the driveway of the Baker Hotel onto Hubbard Street. The picture was taken in 1958. The building behind the Oldsmobile/Cadillac sign is the Beetham Funeral Home. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20453/
The Period Hotel
Postcard of the Period Hotel, a two-story building with Neo-classical architecture which was located at the corner of NW 4th Avenue and 6th Street, in Mineral Wells, Texas. There is a horse-drawn carriage parked in front of the hotel and various people standing on the sidewalks around the building. A printed note at the top of the picture reads: "7698. The Period Hotel, Mineral Wells, Texas." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60886/
Period Hotel and Annex
The Period Hotel and Annex was located at N.W. 4th Avenue and 6th Street. It was managed by Miss Lizzie More. The hotel was destroyed by fire. The Annex was later known as the Town House Apartments. The Annex is still extant in 2007. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16207/
Petroleum Products, The Texas Company
This is a picture of truck number D-677, bearing the identification of Texaco Petroleum Products, The Texas Company. A woman sits in the cab of the truck. The truck itself seems to date to about 1912. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16281/
[A Photocopy of the Mineral Wells "Index"]
Shown here is a photocopy of a page from the Mineral Wells "Index." No date is shown. The only legibly complete articles concern the Buck Head Bath House and Pavilion, and the Wagley Bath House and Annex. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20284/
[A Photographic Miscellany of Mineral Wells]
Shown here is a possible composite picture of the attractions about Mineral Wells. It features a panorama of Camp Wolters, dated 1941; A scenic drive, Mineral Wells; the hospital & headquarters Areas; Regimental Areas 4 & 5, Camp Wolters. Several small towns(e.g. Salesville, Graford, and Santo) are shown as existing--but nothing more. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39206/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 1: Infantry Replacement Training Center
This volume includes a time-line of events that took place in Fort Wolters from 1921 to 1973, including biographies of personnel, photographs, diagrams and a Roster of Infantry Replacement Center Officers from 1941. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24855/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 2: Primary Helicopter Center Personnel
This volume includes a list of U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School Commandants from 1961-1973, with biographies and photographs of some personnel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24854/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 3: Primary Helicopter Center Facility
This volume includes a list of abbreviations, a list of Fort Wolters buildings and facilities (with square footage and cost of construction), a detailed history of Fort Wolters; and information on recreational activities, such as the Fort Wolter's Boots & Saddle Club, the Bowling Alley, and Skeet Range. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24853/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 4: Army Primary Helicopter School, Officer Graduation Class
This volume includes a document that was the first official written notice designating Wolters as a Fort, dated June 4, 1963. It also includes biographies, and photographs of graduating pilot classes. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24852/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 5: Military Personnel: Awards, Promotions, Retirements
This volume consists of photographs of personnel receiving awards, promotions, and retirements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24851/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 6: Civilian Personnel
This volume consists of photographs of civilian employees at Fort Wolters, with a few of their biographies. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24850/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 7: Heliports, Stagefields, Directory
This volume consists of photographs and diagrams of stage fields such as Sundance, Mustang, Rawhide, Da Nang, Phu Loi, Soc Trang, and many others. The U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School utilized approximately 1,350 square miles of airspace. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24849/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 8: Southern Airways Company, Southern Airways of Texas
This volume details the role that the Southern Airways Company played in their contracts for Fort Wolters from 1956-1968. The volume includes biographies of key administrators of Southern Airways, a list of employees, a list of reunion attendees, and a time-line of key events. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25116/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 9: Athletic Awards
This volume includes photographs showing personnel receiving trophies and other recognition for sports activities at the base, such as basketball, golf, softball, bowling, and other sports. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25115/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 10: Primary Helicopter School Training Curriculum for Officers and Candidates
This volume details the curriculum at the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter Training School. It includes a chart of training concepts, a school brigade organizational chart, and a description of the 16-week training course. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25114/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 11: 864 Engineer Battalion, Special Category Army and Air Force
This volume includes a history of Special Category Army with Air Force at Fort Wolters, and includes many photographs of the 864th Engineer Battalion. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25113/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 12: U.S. Army Security Agencies
This volume includes many photographs of personnel of the 316th, 303rd, 330th, and 311th Army Security Agency Battalions. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25112/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 13: Police, Fire, Training Aids, Band, Weather Squadron, Recreation, Prisoner of War Camp, Nike, Camp Wolters Enterprise, Parks
This volume includes a brief history (and many photographs) of Fort Wolters' 84th Military Police Detachment, Fire Department, Training Aids, 328th Army Band, Weather Squadron, Recreation, Prisoner of War Camp 1943-1945, Nike, Camp Wolters Enterprise, and Parks. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25111/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 14: Officer Wives Club and NCO Wives Club Activities
This volume includes many photographs of the activities of the Fort Wolters' Officers' Wives Club, NCO Wives Club, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Teen Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25110/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 15: U.S. Army Hospital, Army Nurses, Beach Army Hospital, American Red Cross, Grey Ladies, Red Cross Volunteers, Dental Clinic
This volume includes photographs of the U.S. Army Hospital, Army Nurses, the Beach Army Hospital, the American Red Cross, the Grey Ladies, Red Cross Volunteers, and the Dental Clinic. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34984/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 16: Historic
This volume includes photographs of local citizens, pictures of the Possum Kingdom dam, and a record of a visit to the Fort from [then] Senator Lyndon B. Johnson. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34983/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 17: Aircraft Airports
This volume includes photographs of the Mineral Wells Municipal Airport, maps, illustrations of aircraft, and articles on the Whirlybird, the Bell H-13 Helicopter, the OH-23 Raven the H-23D, the TH-55A Osage and the Hover Simulator. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34982/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 18: Awards for Best Mess Halls, Most Reenlistments, and Best Drivers
This volume includes photographs of personnel being honored for Best Mess Halls, Most Re-enlistments, and Best Drivers. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34981/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 19: Foreign Students
This volume features photographs of foreign military students attending the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter Training School. Students came from Australia, United Kingdom, Burma, Chile, France, Germany, Guatemala, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Laos, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Turkey, and Vietnam. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34985/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 20: 697th Engineer Company, U.S. Army Reserve Units, 355th Engineer Battalion, 931st Engineer Group, 362nd Civil Affairs Units
This volume features the following: The 697th Engineer Company, U.S. Army Reserve Units, the 355th Engineer Battalion, the 931st Engineer Group and the 362nd Civil Affairs Units. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34980/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 21: Visitors
This volume includes photographs of visitors to Fort Wolters. Images include Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson, several generals, and assorted dignitaries. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34979/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 22: Enlisted Photos
This volume contains photographs of enlisted personnel. It features ceremonies, promotions, and awards. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34978/
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 23: Miscellaneous
This volume includes photographs of ceremonies, cake cuttings, recreational events, holidays, and other activities. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth34977/
The Piedmont Hotel
The Piedmont Hotel, located on NE 2nd Avenue and East Hubbard Street, was demolished to make room for the Baker Hotel Garage. Before its destruction, it was used as an office for the Army Engineers during the construction of Possum Kingdom Dam. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20291/
The Piedmont Hotel [The First Piedmont Hotel]
A picture (perhaps an early photograph) of the first Piedmont Hotel,where the Baker Hotel Garage is presently [2015]. It was built by a colonel R.W. Duke of Weatherford, Texas He purchased the block and built this frame hotel. Later on, a large brick building was put in its place.This photograph appears on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," Second Edition, 1988. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20292/
Piedmont Hotel - [The First Piedmont With Numerous Individuals on Porches]
The First Piedmont Hotel. This photograph was probably taken in the early twentieth century, judging by the attire of the men photographed. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20286/