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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church -- 17 of 18: Architechtural View Looking Up at Steeple]
This picture shows a detail of the gable of the Sanctuary, St. Mark's Lutheran Church, Mineral Wells, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25019/
St. Nicholas Hotel
A note with the picture states: The original picture was re-done and re-named the "Delaware Hotel." This picture appears on page 104 in "Time Was..." The building was located at 316 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. It was eventually destroyed by fire. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16182/
[The St. Nicholas Hotel]
A group of men stand in front of newly-constructed St. Nicholas Hotel. A colophon at the lower right designates this picture as a photographic souvenir from Minerals Wells, taken by Dan W. Evans. This hotel, later known as the Delaware Hotel, was located at at N. Oak and NE 3rd Street. It was eventually consumed by fire. The back of photograph has a T and P Railway logotype and this information about the Jericho Fine Photo Company: "Mountain and Donkey Groups, View Souvenirs and Scenery of Min-Wells, Kodak Supplies and Finishing, Button and Stamp Photos a Specialty. Dan W. Evans Prop. Min Wells, Tex." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16357/
The Stage in the Casino [Elmhurst Parkl]
This picture illustrates the stage in the casino at Elmhurst Park. Several signs above the stage advertise the (Cafe) Royal, furniture, and the Palace Bar. Two unidentified women and one man stand on the stage. It appears on page 187 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", second edition, 1988. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20350/
Stamps & Phillipt [sic] Demonstrating Their Automobile
Stamps and Phillips, inventors, demonstrating their Storm Alarm invention. Note that "Phillips" is spelled with one "l" and a "t" on the hand-written caption. The car is sitting in front of the second Carlsbad drinking pavilion on W. Watts Street (now NW 4th Street.) The photograph was taken during the 1920's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20413/
Standard Park
The Standard Park not only had a swimming pool, but a movie theater and dancing pavilion for the entertainment of health-seekers. A trolley to it operated at 600 North Oak Street from 1907 to 1913. (Note the Kingsley Hotel above and left of the Standard, built into the side of East Mountain--later destroyed by fire.) First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, then later as the Beach, the Standard+ was torn down in World War II; and a USO Club was built here for soldiers at Camp Wolters. The USO building was given to the city after the war, and renamed the North Oak Community Center. The Crazy Water Festival Committee is currently [2003] attempting to restore the Community Center. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24956/
Standard Park [and Amusement Park]
The Trolley goes by Standard Park and Standard Pavilion around 1913. A popular place,the Standard had a swimming pool, amphitheater, dancing and playgrounds. The North Oak Community is now at this location. Information was taken from A.F Weaver's "Time Was" second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29823/
Standard [Well and Amusement Park]
Formerly the Vichy Well, it was re-named the Standard Well and Amusement Park. Note the large mineral water bottle sign in the lower right hand corner of the picture. The building was torn down during World War II, and replaced by USO Club. The North Oak Community Center is at this location as of 2008. Information about it was taken from A.F. Weaver "Time Was" page 67. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29819/
Star House
The Star House was built about 1900,and owned by Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Ramsey. This 34-room hotel was situated at 315 Coke Street. A colophon at the bottom of the picture, barely legible, reads: "1903 Ramsey House Mineral Wells, Texas John Ramsey Ima Ramsey." This photograph appears on page 105 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20294/
The Star Well Water Company
The Star Well Water Company was located in the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue (then called "Mesquite Street"). A. F. Weaver remarks on page 53 of "Time Was...," that "Selling mineral water and establishing bath houses was[sic]big business for 'The Nations Greatest Health Resort'." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24988/
Star Well (Winter Scene)
"Winter Scene--Shipping Star Well Water--From Min Wells Texas" The Star Well was located at the northeast corner of the intersection of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue, across the street and north of the Baker Hotel. The telephone building is currently [2008] located there. A "date", handwritten on the bottom right corner of image, reads--possibly--"1899", which would explain the unpaved street and the lack of automobiles. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24973/
Strange Structure [article]
An article written by Maid J. Neal, in an unknown publication, describes the construction and design of the Hexagon Hotel, which was built in 1895-1897 by D. G. Galbraith. See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]for further details. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20478/
[The Street Car to Elmhurst Park]
Mineral Wells residents and visitors could ride a streetcar out of town to Elmhurst Park. The streetcar in the picture had come to the park by way of North Oak Street. After a ride from town, the passengers could walk across the swinging bridge which spanned Pollard Creek to enter Elmhurst Park. This photograph is to be found on page 86 of "Time Was..." (Second Edition), by A. F. Weaver. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20280/
Street Parade / West Texas C. of C. Convention / Mineral Wells 1925
A parade on North Oak Avenue in Mineral Wells, Texas is the subject of this picture. Businesses partaking of it include Poston Dry Goods, a bath house, the Hexagon Hotel, Palace Drugs, American Cafe, and the Caldwell Hotel. American flags, Texas flags, and various banners are hanging from the buildings. The parade is moving south (while the picture is looking north) on N. Oak Avenue, at its intersection with SE 1st Street It was held during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention of 1925. The photograph bears the colophon of Basil Clemens Photo Company of Breckenridge, Texas. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16301/
[ A Street Scene]
This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope, are some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) The scene is believed to show some of the large homes on the east slope of West Mountain, in the 600 block of NW 6th Street, taken at about the time of their construction. The home in the foreground appears to be the site of the former Episcopal Parsonage (the church adjoins the parsonage to the north (left of the picture). texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20374/
[A Street Scene, Taken About the 1930's]
This photograph illustrates the "New" Crazy Hotel on North Oak Avenue, which opened in 1927 after the earlier hotel burned March 15, 1925. Many automobiles typical of the period can be seen on the street. Note the following businesses: Tom Moore, Barber Shop, Cafe, Young's Studio, Bath House, Crazy Drug. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20448/
[A Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
Information taken from the back of the photograph reads: "Entrance to Elmhurst Park with trolley car. Picture taken around 1910. Entrance to the park with a swinging bridge over Pollard Creek later taken over and made into the Mineral Wells dump grounds. About 2 miles southwest of Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20321/
[The Sunshine Special]
A locomotive engine pulls the Texas & Pacific "Red Eye" passenger train, named The Sunshine Special. These business-friendly trains were scheduled to arrive in the Dallas/Ft Worth area at about 9 AM from both the east and the west. This picture was taken by A.F. Weaver at Millsap, Texas in 1940. It was published in the Rotogravure section of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The 700- (714-) series engine shown was replaced a few years later by larger, more powerful Series 600 engines capable of greater speed. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16248/
[A Supervisor at the Crazy Bottling/Crystals Plant]
Identifying information on this photograph is lacking, but it appears to portray a supervisor in the Crazy Bottling/Crystals Plant catching up on the paperwork produced by a day's business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29411/
Surface Weather Map
This booklet gives an overview of surface weather maps as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Surface Weather Map, interpretation of data from plotted station models, [and] analysis of maps to include pressure centers and fronts" as well as the "Use of map for flight planning." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46573/
[The Suspension Bridge over Brazos River (2)]
A view of suspension bridge being built over the Brazos river near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto county. The view is looking west. An inscription on the mounting of the photograph reads: "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20232/
[The Suspension Bridge Over the Brazos River (1)]
Shown here is a view of suspension bridge being built over the Brazos River near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto County. Printed in the corner of the mount is "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20233/
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60945/
[A Tamale Vendor on Oak and Hubbard]
Fred Estrada "The Mineral Wells Hot Tamale Man," sold "The Best Tamales Anywhere", at 75 cents a dozen, at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue for many years. Automobiles, dating from the early-to-mid-twentieth century, and a U.S. Mailbox, may also be seen in the picture. The picture occurs on page 182 of "TIME WAS...", second edition. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16267/
The Tattler, May 18, 1934
Student newspaper from Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas. It contains articles about the graduating class of 1934, including information about class officers, class prophecies, caps and gowns, class events, and local advertisements. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16320/
Teletype Sequence Reports
This booklet gives an overview of teletype sequence reports as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes "A complete explanation of the symbols and abbreviations used in teletype sequence reports." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46575/
Ten Years Younger
This picture displays the title page of a booklet about Mineral Wells, Texas health resorts--and how they could make people feel ten years younger. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth21921/
Terminal and Area Forecasts
This booklet gives an overview of terminal and area forecasts as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes an "Explanation of the information provided on terminal and area forecasts; to include valid time, forecast weather, and hazards to flight." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46568/
Texas Carlsbad Water
The first building for the Texas Carlsbad Well, one of the early mineral water wells which brought tourists to Mineral Wells is shown here. This picture appears on page 62 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, who dates it around 1895. Weaver includes a bit of advertising by Texas Carlsbad Mineral Water, "Makes a man love his wife, Makes a wife love her husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24982/
Texas Carlsbad Water
A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25108/
Texas Carlsbad Water
This photograph illustrates the Texas Carlsbad Well at Mineral Wells, Texas, one of the early drinking pavilions in the "City built on water." It was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. Shown here is an early picture of the Carlsbad, as later views show slight additions and alterations in response to competition among drinking pavilions for business. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24986/
Texas Carlsbad Well
The Texas Carlsbad Well, 415 N.W. 1st Avenue is illustrated, this picture taken about around 1908. This first Carlsbad pavilion was directly across N.W. 1st Avenue, west of the second Crazy well pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway ran down N.W. 1st Avenue between the two pavilions from 1905 to 1909 providing service each 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto. The "Ben Hur" gasoline-powered motor cars were the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" in service on the tracks that are visible in this picture. This picture can be found on page 82 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS ... ", first edition. A second pavilion, a modern brick structure, was added in 1909 and the original wooden building was later removed. The second pavilion was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning during World War II. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24969/
Texas Carlsbad Well [1 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street west of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion. This picture appears to be a promotional advertisement for the pavilion. The name of the well was lettered at the top of the building under the large eaves of the roof. The pavilion was replaced with a brick building, the "New Carlsbad Well' around 1909. Stained glass windows were added to the new pavilion showing a picture of Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water. This picture has been cropped, and the second picture of this image shows more of the outer detail. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24979/
Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]
An early picture of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex" texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24978/
Texas Carlsbad Well [3 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, was one of the early mineral water wells in Mineral Wells. It was located directly across the street, and west of the first Crazy Water Well drinking pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad Pavilion is prominent in several pictures taken in 1908, but this structure was demolished and replaced with a brick structure in 1911. This picture is slightly cropped but it is slightly sharper in certain areas than the previous two pictures. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24990/
[The Texas Carlsbad Well Slogan]
A picture of the slogan posted in the Texas Carlsbad Well pavilion with "proof" that a Cadillac, with its radiator filled with mineral water, was rejuvenated with enough "pep" to pass a Chevrolet. Please note: The first Cadillac V-8 engine was introduced in 1914 as the 'Type 51' engine, so this photograph may be dated to 1914 or thereafter. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24976/
Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is another picture of the Texas Carlsbad Wells, Mineral Wells, Texas. The Carlsbad was one of the early mineral water drinking pavilions in "the city built on water," located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad was on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway Line. Gasoline-powered trolleys, known as the "Dinky Cars", operated at 15-minute intervals between Mineral Wells and Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1909. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24987/
Texas & Pacific [Bus]
This is a photograph of the bus that conveyed passengers that got off the Texas & Pacific's "Sunshine Special" in Millsap to their destination in Mineral Werlls. This picture was taken in 1940. Information about this picture is taken from Arthur Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", page 96. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20434/
Texas Trade Review
An early street scene showing buildings and a horse-drawn wagon. Written in lower left corner is "Texas Trade Review." The sign over the sidewalk reads "D.M. Howard." There were several D.M. Howard stores (see page 122 in "Time Was...", second edition). This scene was probably on Mesquite Street in the 100 block. It is undated. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20303/
Thompson-Cunningham Home
This picture is, apparently, a page distributed during a 1975 "Tour of Homes." It is best viewed and read when enlarged on the computer screen. The picture is a copy of the one used on page 141 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. This house, at 215 NE 2nd Street, is Queen Anne style, spindle work subtype. It was restored in 2006 by Bill Pratt, Jr. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20267/
[Three Old-Time Stores]
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth60925/
Three Railroads to Mineral Wells
Pamphlet containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20345/
Thunderstorms
This booklet gives an overview of thunderstorms as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Factors necessary for thunderstorm formation, structures, types and dangers of thunderstorms, [and] flight techniques." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth46569/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 5 of 8, Mr. & Mrs. Jack Dickens purchased 1st Book]
The auction of copies of the first Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." Pictured here are auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, and successful bidders on Copy No. 1: Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dickens. The author, A.F. Weaver, stands in the background, and Mrs. Bea Harris is in the corner to the right of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29425/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 6 of 8, Community Leaders]
The auction of the first ten numbered copies of the First Edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells...", was held in the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." The auctioneer, the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, stands with Mayor H. Arthur Zappe, successful bidder for copy Number 2 in this picture. Author A. F. Weaver stands to the rear of Reverend Mr. Moore and Mayor Zappe. Banker Frost Bowman, successful bidder for Copy Number 4, is in the corner at right of the picture. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29426/
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 7 of 8, Jack Dickens and Unknown Man Displaying Their Books]
The auction of copies of the first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells," by A. F. Weaver, held at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29424/
[The TIME WAS Book Auction]
The auction of first edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." The men in picture were: (left to right) the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Art Weaver, author; H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, Mayor of Mineral Wells; and Frost Bowman, Banker. The Reverend Mr. Moore was pastor of the First Baptist Church at the time. Mr. Weaver was a photographer, and the first president of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Dr. Zappe was a dentist, and Mr. Bowman was a Director of Mineral Wells Heritage Association. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20412/
Time Was in Mineral Wells
The dust cover of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells... 1975 Edition." It is considered the first pictorial history of the city. The book is the product of A.F. Weaver, whose collection of photographs constitutes this collection. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16294/
[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System
A trolley car of the Mineral Wells Electric System. is shown here. Trolleys ran from 1907 to 1913, carrying passengers to Pinto Lake west of town, and to Elmhurst Park and Lake two miles southwest of town. Information about them, displayed here and in other photographs, was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells," second edition, page 84. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20351/
[A Trolley Car of the] Mineral Wells Electric System
This picture shows the Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car Number 23. The Mineral Wells Electric System operated from 1907 to 1913. The picture appears to have been taken in the 1400 block of W. Hubbard Street, where the street car unloaded passengers for a short hike north to Lake Pinto. The street car reversed here, and traveled across town to Elmwood Cemetery--about NE 17th Avenue. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16266/