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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970

Date: April 23, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970

Date: April 30, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 25, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 2, 1970

Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 25, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 2, 1970

Date: May 2, 1970
Creator: Hinkle, Robert N.
Description: Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Brick Factory]

[The Brick Factory]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The abundant clay in and around Palo Pinto County was recognized around the turn of the 20th century as a source of raw material for brick manufacturing. Rejected fine coal from the area's coal mines furnished heat to fire the clay and bake it into brick. This brick factory in far western Parker County, near the Rock Creek coal mine, was a major industry in Mineral Wells. The factory was first opened on January 21 of 1921. The factory is in full operation in this photograph, with train cars on the tracks and bricks stacked along the rail area awaiting shipment. Area-made bricks were used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave both the highway from Mineral Wells to Ft. Worth as well as many of the streets in in that city, and to pave Congress Avenue in Austin.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

[The Bridge at the Old Elmhurst Park]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture illustrates the swinging bridge crossing Pollard Creek in Elmhurst Park. Note the Mineral Wells Electric Railway street car (trolley) in the background. Elmhurst Park was located about where SW 25th Street and SW 25th Avenue are located today. Both Elmhurst Park and the streetcar operated from about 1907 to 1913. The dam over Pollard Creek was broached, and the lake was drained after the park closed. A housing development was built on the old Elmhurst Park grounds during World War II. Writing on the photograph dates it to 1907, shortly after the Park opened, and identifies the two visitors on the bridge as Allen and Charles-- apparently father and son.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas

A Brief History or a Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: September 24, 1921
Creator: Berry, H. M.
Description: A booklet about the history of Mineral Wells, Texas, from 1881 to 1921.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Brief History or A Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas From 1881 to 1921

A Brief History or A Statement of Facts of Mineral Wells, Texas From 1881 to 1921

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: None
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]

[A Brochure, Titled "Mineral Wells - A Town Built on Water"]

Date: 1981~
Creator: unknown
Description: One side of a fold-out brochure produced by the Mineral Wells Chamber of Commerce, probably during the City's centennial year, 1981. On the reverse side is a statement: "Mineral Wells, a Texas Main Street City, looks back over a century of history rich with the tales of early day ranching and the discovery of mineral water and its medicinal qualities." Color photographs of the city and its scenic area landmarks are contained in the brochure, along with a listing of some annual local activities.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]

[The Budweiser Clydesdale Team]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: A scene in the 400 block of North Oak, looking towards the south on Oak Avenue, taken in the 1930's. (Shadows indicate the picture was taken in the early morning.) The Budweiser Clydesdale team was introduced to the public in 1933, and is shown along the 200 block west. The "CRAZY" sign that spanned Hubbard Ave. (now US Highway 180) a block behind the Clydesdale team was erected in 1933 also, probably later in the same year the picture was taken. A two-story garage/office building, the former Seaman's Pontiac Agency (still standing in 2010) is visible alongside the Anheuser-Busch beer wagon. Other businesses noted are: Dr. M. S. Green, Chiropractor; King's Cafe. The prominent building behind the Clydesdale team is still standing at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue. Advertising signs noted: Texaco, Mobilgas, and a sign on the seaman's building for Crazy Water Crystals.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Burning of the Crazy Flats]

[The Burning of the Crazy Flats]

Date: March 15, 1925
Creator: unknown
Description: The "Crazy Flats" drinking pavilion, with rooms for rent, replaced a two-story Crazy Water drinking pavilion in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in 1912, and an annex was added to it in 1914. A fire in the Drug Store of the "Crazy Flats" (SE corner of the Crazy Flats building) on March 15, 1925, destroyed the entire Crazy block. The "New", completely rebuilt, Crazy Hotel was enlarged to cover the entire block. It opened in 1927, and replaced all of the burned buildings. The new building was promoted as fireproof, since it was built with solid cement walls and ceilings. The former "new Crazy Hotel" had a colorful past that included a daily radio show originating in its Lobby and broadcast nationally over TQN (the Texas Quality Network). It had survived the Great Depression of the 'thirties, World War I, the Korean "Police Action", and the Viet Nam War.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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