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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Language: English
[The Calvary Baptist Parsonage 1975]

[The Calvary Baptist Parsonage 1975]

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This home was the parsonage for the Calvary Baptist Church in 1975. The home has a rock facade and appears to have a porch on the side of the structure. This is one of a series of pictures of the church and parsonage showing structural damage, prior to their demolition and replacement with more modern structures. The original church faced south on SE 5th Street, and its replacement occupies the same city block but faces west on SE 6th Avenue.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters:  A  picture book of the camp and its activities

A Camera Trip Through Camp Wolters: A picture book of the camp and its activities

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: According to the introduction, "Here is your Camp Wolters, a photo-record of faces and places to hold for you the memory of your first days in Our Army at this infantry replacement training center." The booklet includes photographs and a commentary regarding different sorts of training and exercise, meal times, recreational activities, and camp buildings.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Camp Wolters, Infantry Replacement Training Center, Mineral Wells, Texas

Camp Wolters, Infantry Replacement Training Center, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: This booklet gives an overview of the camp at Fort Wolters including the facilities, activities, and general rules. It also includes sketched maps of the camp.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Camp Wolters - Texas

Camp Wolters - Texas

Date: 1945
Creator: Camp Wolters Studio
Description: Illustrated here is a panoramic view of Camp Wolters, Texas. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Area No. 4, Sports Arena, Service Club, Area No. 5, Area No. 3, Area No. 2, and Area No.1. Platoons of soldiers are marching on the left side of the photograph.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1913?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Carlisle House was owned and managed by Mrs. A. E. Carlisle, after the death of her husband in 1911. It was one of the largest hotels of its day, boasting sixty rooms. It was destroyed in a fire on July 4, 1914. The Abilene "Reporter" of July 5, 1914 reports that fire started its course at the Tourist Hotel (located, at the time, at 315 NW 4th street). It spread to the New Hazel Hotel (at 305 NW 4th Street), took in the Harrel House, (at 301 NW 4th street), the Lake Charles, Louisiana (511 NW 2nd Street), and the Burk House, 601 NW 3rd Avenue, as well as to seven houses that were not hotels. The fire was so thorough that in 1921, the area was still devoid of houses. It was on this site that Mordecai Ham (he who converted Billy Graham) put up a tent for a revival on March 23, 1927. He accepted the position of pastor at the First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City on June 19, 1927. He remained in that position until June 16, 1929, when he returned to the revival circuit. The Carlisle House was located in the same block as ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Carlisle House, Mineral Wells Texas

The Carlisle House, Mineral Wells Texas

Date: unknown
Creator: unknown
Description: The Carlisle House was once located at 316 NW 3rd Avenue, and NW 4th Street. It filled a quarter of the block, and, with sixty rooms, was one of the largest hotels in Mineral wells. It owned and managed by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Emmett Carlisle. Mr. Carlisle died in 1911, but his widow continued to manage the hotel. The hotel met its doom in a fire that consumed six hotels and seven dwellings during its rampage. The conflagration was so thorough that the location was still empty in 1921. The Nazareth Hospital as eventually built in this location. The architecture is possibly best described as an eclectic mix of Prairie and Queen Anne Styles, the later style perhaps reflecting additions to the original building. [For further details, please see the other picture, also labeled "Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas."]
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Carlsbad Well

Carlsbad Well

Date: September 19, 1907
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture, dated September 19, 1907, shows the Carlsbad Well at 415 NW 1st Avenue, and west of the Crazy Well drinking pavilion. It was one of the first drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, and boasted that the water "Makes a man love HIS wife, makes a wife love HER husband/ Robs the divorce court of its business/ Takes the temper out of red-headed people/ Puts ginger into ginks/ and pepper into plodders."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Carlsbad Well:  First Building]

[The Carlsbad Well: First Building]

Date: September 19, 1907
Creator: unknown
Description: The first Carlsbad Well drinking pavilion was built about 1895. The Carlsbad (also known as the Texas Carlsbad Well), one of the early drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife/ Makes a wife love HER husband/ Robs the divorce court of its business/ Takes the temper out of red-headed people/ Puts ginger into ginks/ And pepper into plodders." The pavilion was prominent in several pictures around the turn of the century; this picture--labeled "Sept. 19/07" in ink--was from an advertisement by the Yeager Drug Company. This early pavilion had been demolished by 1911, and replaced by a larger brick structure.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Date: 1910?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue (west of the Crazy Water Well and second Crazy Drinking Pavilion) is shown here. The number "1921" on the picture appears to refer to some sort of set It is not a date. Please note the complete absence of automobiles in the picture, and the unhitched buggy to the right foreground. (The gasoline powered "Dinky Car" tracks, which served this area of NW 1st Avenue from 1905 to 1909, are not visible here, nor does the street appear to be paved. The city streets were paved in 1914.) A more modern brick building was added to this wooden pavilion in 1909; both structures are visible in pictures taken during a Woodmen of the World convention in 1911. (Note: The newer Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning when the second Carlsbad Pavilion shut down operations during World War II.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Carlsbad Well:  Second Building]

[The Carlsbad Well: Second Building]

Date: 1908?
Creator: unknown
Description: The original Carlsbad water pavilion, a two-story wooden building at 415 NW 1st Avenue (directly across the street and west of the Crazy pavilion) was built in the mid-1890's. This second pavilion, a red-brick building, replaced the original one at the same location. The Mineral Wells Scenic Railway ran its gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" from 1905 to 1909 each quarter-hour on tracks that led north on N.W. 1st Avenue, and turned west on NW 6th Street. The Ben Hur was the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars". This picture was taken before the stained glass windows were installed in the pavilion, and before the Dinky Car tracks were removed. The pavilion was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its laundry and dry cleaning in the 1930's after the Carlsbad closed.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library