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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1910-1919
 Year: 1911
 Language: No Language
[The "Doodle Bug" Interior]

[The "Doodle Bug" Interior]

Date: 1911/1935
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph illustrates the interior of a McKeen motor car, known locally as a "Doodle Bug", with its dust-proof round windows. This one, owned by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, was an 81-passenger, 70-foot-long, 200-horsepower, gasoline-powered, motor coach. It traveled from Graford through Oran and Salesville to Mineral Wells, thence on to Dallas. It made a round trip daily from 1912 to 1929. There was a turntable at Graford to turn the coach around. There were two "Doodle Bugs" on the WMW&NW. The third similar coach, owned by the Gulf, Texas and Western Railroad (GT&W), traveled from Seymour through Guthrie, and Jacksboro to Salesville beginning in 1913. It proceeded thence over the WMW&NW track to Mineral Wells, and on to Dallas.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]

[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]

Date: 1911
Creator: unknown
Description: The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men in two of the trees to the right of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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