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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Artwork
 Decade: 1900-1909
[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]
A 1906 seasonal advertisement, compliments Central Texas Realty Association, depicts a young lady (An Art Nouveau goddess?) half-kneeling before a frame that suggests stained glass. She is holding a water jug, from which pours a stream of healing elixir that splashes into the lowermost center of the brochure. Decorative scrolls reminiscent of wrought iron sculpture decorate the advertisement. Stars, both in the advertisement and on the lady's tiara, hint that Mineral Wells is the City of Light. What appears to be a coffee stain shows at the upper left. Someone has penciled "1905" in the upper right corner. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29836/
Mineral Wells School Texas (Architectural Drawing?)
This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." It appears to be a reproduction of a greatly reduced architectural drawing. The building pictured here has been shown to be the Mineral Wells College, under the direction of Professor John McCracken. An edition of the "Weatherford Democrat" of September 12, 1895 reports that the school has had "...six years of phenomenal success, and now finds larger quarters necessary. The beautiful building soon to adorn the campus will be a testimonial from the people as to the excellent work accomplished by Prof. McCracken and his competent faculty, as well as a guarantee to prospectors that their children will be as thoroughly instructed as in larger cities." Although the school touts itself as a "College", the modern reader is more likely to regard it as a private boarding school. The advertisement in the "Weatherford Democrat" shows the building, here, which may be the same picture. Its caption announces that the Mineral Wells College offers "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses." Board is given (in 1895) at "$10.00 per month"; Tuition is listed as "$1,60 to $4.10." The modern reader [in 2014] is permitted to contemplate these prices, without further comment. The style of the building is Romanesque, which in 1895, represented the acme of this style for public (and apparently, semi-public) buildings, as well). It was considered, in its time, an expensive style of architecture (it was solid masonry). Professor McCracken's choice of this style of building may only be described as ambitious. At the present time [2014], no building of this description appears to be extant in Mineral Wells. It is conjectured that, for reasons unknown, the building was never built. The fate of the "College" remains unknown. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25053/