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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Resource Type: Photograph
 Decade: 1910-1919
 Year: 1914
[The Crazy Flats and First Crazy Hotel]

[The Crazy Flats and First Crazy Hotel]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: A view of early Mineral Wells from East Mountain shows the Crazy Flats in the foreground, and the first Crazy Hotel at the left, at the rear of it. The small building at the right, rear of the Crazy Flats housed the "Crazy Woman's Well" that contributed the generic "Crazy Water" name to the local mineral water. Crazy Flats, the second Crazy Drinking Pavilion with "Rooms for Rent" on the second floor, was built in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections: The first section, at the left rear of Crazy Flats, was built in 1912, and the second section, left of it, was built in 1914, and joined to the first with a common lobby. The low building to the left of Crazy Flats and in front of the Hotel was the Crazy Bath House and Drugstore. A fire started in the drugstore March 15, 1925, and destroyed the entire city block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering this entire city block, opened in 1927. The original Crazy Well is now situated in the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Hotel with a cover over it. The second Crazy Hotel is now [2008] a Retirement Home. ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
The Crazy Theatre

The Crazy Theatre

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: The Crazy Theater was located at 400 North Oak Avenue, on the east side of the street opposite the Crazy Hotel. The sign reads: "Week Commencing Monday June 22." The street does not appear to be paved, which dates the picture prior to 1914. Bennett's Office Supply now [2013] occupies the site of the former theater. The theater features in A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 17.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

[A Horse-Drawn Fire Wagon]

Date: July 4, 1914
Creator: unknown
Description: The location this photograph illustrates is unidentified. It may be of the great fire of July 4, 1914, which burned some 34 homes in Mineral Wells between Hubbard and NW 6th Street, between NW 2nd Avenue and NW 4th Avenue. The white horses pulling the fire truck in the middle of the picture were named "Joe" and "Frank". Their regular driver was a man named Cogdell.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Oak Street, Looking South

Oak Street, Looking South

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture shows the 100 block of what is now N. Oak Avenue, looking south. The "Palace Saloon" sign is still visible in 2008. The Palo Pinto County Courthouse Annex currently [2010] occupies the building that once housed Poston's Dry Goods (just down the street from the Palace Saloon). Please note the absence of trolley tracks--or the festoon of wires required to keep its power-line in place. The unpaved street dates the photograph prior to 1914, and probably prior to the previous picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Two Women in Wylie Park]

[Two Women in Wylie Park]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: Two women are pictured strolling in Wylie Park. Notes on back of the photograph read: "Corner of N. Oak and N.E. 1st Street, the West side of Wylie Park, a popular place for strolling." N. Oak Avenue is in background, with North to the right in the picture. Hazelwood Drugs is on the west side of Oak Ave, opposite the park. Mineral Wells. The streets of Mineral Wells were paved in the summer of 1914. A wagon can be seen traveling north on Oak Avenue. What appears to be a work crew may be seen at the corner indicates that the finishing touches may have been in the process of being applied to the paving as the picture was taken.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]

[A View from West Mountain, about 1912]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: This photograph was taken after the Chautauqua was demolished (that is, about 1912). The foundation can be seen in the upper right quadrant. The Post Office, completed in 1913, is visible to the right of the Chautauqua ruins. The old viewing tower on the top of the hill, destroyed by a tornado in 1930, is just barely visible in the trees on top of the hill. The first Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats drinking pavilion, which burned in 1925, are seen one block northwest of the Post Office. The Murphy home is on top of the hill in the middle of the photograph. The Hexagon Hotel (torn down in 1959) is just above and left of the center. The Vichy Well is just to the right of the Hexagon House, and is now the location of the North Oak Community Center. In the the next block north (left) of the Hexagon House, facing west, is the Fairfield Inn with a ground-level entrance on each floor. Note the city's water tower at left center.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]

[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]

Date: 1914?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.)
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library