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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1930-1939
 Language: No Language
 Collection: A. F. Weaver Collection
[The Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church]

[The Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church]

Date: 1938
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture, showing Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church, was taken approximately in 1938. The church, pictured here, shows a later second story to the building on the side of the church proper. It is known to be the second Methodist church on the site. Older photographs of its predecessor are at this time [2014] lacking.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Crazy Crystals]

[Crazy Crystals]

Date: 1930/1939
Creator: unknown
Description: Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Crazy Fiz]

[Crazy Fiz]

Date: 1930/1939
Creator: unknown
Description: Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]

[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]

Date: 1930/1939
Creator: unknown
Description: A caption on the back of the photograph states, "This picture, taken in the 1930's, shows the drinking pavilion in the [lacuna] Crazy Hotel." Recognizable are Boyce Ditto, standing third from right; N.E. Adams, last on the right, standing reading a newspaper; and Mrs. Veale, mother of Cecil Young, seated on left. Many people came to Mineral Wells to bathe and to "Drink their way to health" at the many wells and pavilions that catered to the public. This drinking pavilion is still extant, just off the lobby of the "Crazy" (now [2008] a retirement home), but it no longer dispenses mineral water.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]

[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]

Date: 1938
Creator: unknown
Description: Fishermen stand below a cataract of the spillway of Lake Mineral Wells. The photograph was taken in 1938. On the reverse of the picture is the and-written legend: Picture taken by A. F. Weaver. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 112.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Four golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]

[Four golfers at Mineral Wells Country Club - 1930's]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: Four unidentified men in golfing knickers (apparently from the early 1930's) stand in front of, and across the lake from the original Holiday Hills Country Club house. They are putting on what is now the Number 12 green.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Group of men at Inspiration Point]

[A Group of men at Inspiration Point]

Date: 1930?/1939?
Creator: unknown
Description: A group of businessmen and ranchers are shown at Inspiration Point in the 1920's. From left, they are (unknown); Mr. Henry Penix; Mr. Bowman; Mssrs. Henry and Charlie Fowler. Note the spurs on the boots of the Fowlers, and the cigars in the hands of Mssrs. Penix and Bowman. Inspiration Point, overlooking the Brazos in Southeast Palo Pinto County about ten miles south of Mineral Wells, commands a vast panoramic view of the rugged river valley stretching for miles below the viewer. It was a noted scenic attraction during the heyday of one of America's most popular health resorts. It is not available to the general public at this time, as it is located on private property.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Inside of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant]

[Inside of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant]

Date: 1930/1939
Creator: unknown
Description: Handwriting on the back of this photograph identifies it as "Crazy Fiz 1930s" It is a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant, where carbon dioxide appears to have been added to the mineral water in order to compete with the popular soft drinks of the era. Note the bottling machine in the right foreground of the picture. Women are packing the carbonated "fizz water" for shipment.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Milling Sanatorium]

[The Milling Sanatorium]

Date: 1935?
Creator: unknown
Description: Dr. H. H. Milling was the first of Mineral Wells' "rubbin' doctors." He operated the Mineral Wells Sanatorium at 315 NW 1st Avenue before building this sanitarium in the 2500 block of SE 6th Avenue - the old Millsap Highway) about 1929. The building was later sold and renamed Irvine Sanitarium. It now [2010] belongs to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, is located at 1400 SE VFW Highway (a branch of SE 6th Avenue), and houses VFW Post 2399. Dr. Milling also owned 60 acres on Pollard Creek in north Mineral Wells that were donated to the state of Texas to use as a State Park, which became SP8. During the Great Depression of the 1930's, the WPA and the CCC made several additions to that park to improve its recreational value: Bridges, a small dam, steps up the mountain, restrooms, etc., all using native sandstone. When Milling Park was determined by the state to be surplus property, it was deeded to the city and later renamed North City Park.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

[A Panoramic View of Lake Mineral Wells]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: An early panoramic view of Lake Mineral Wells is illustrated here. The lake was built by the city of Mineral Wells for a municipal water supply in 1920. Rock Creek, in Parker County, was dammed to impound a lake approximately one mile wide and five miles long. An island, visible in the center of this picture, was initially accessible only by boat; but a wooden walkway eventually connected it to the concrete dam. The dam at Lake Mineral Wells was raised because of the increased need for water due to the building of Camp Wolters and its expansion into the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center in the nation in World War II. The island was thereafter covered by water. Lake Mineral Wells eventually became partially filled with silt, and another water supply was sought. Palo Pinto Creek was dammed by the city In the mid 1960's to form Lake Palo Pinto, approximately ten miles southwest of the county seat of Palo Pinto County. It became the current source of Mineral Wells' municipal water supply. Lake Mineral Wells was donated to Texas Parks and Wildlife in 1980, and became the focal point of Lake Mineral Wells State Park. Due to its ...
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
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