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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1910-1919
 Year: 1915
[The Carlsbad Well: Second Building]
Shown here is a picture of the second Carlsbad Well building, as it appeared around 1915. The stained glass windows are shown installed, and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks have been removed. This picture appears in Weaver, A. F., "TIME WAS ...", 1st Edition, on page 63. The original Carlsbad Pavilion was on the northeast corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 6th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway provided a gasoline-powered motor car, a "Dinky Car", which provided service every 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto from 1903 to 1909. The "Ben Hur" was the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" whose tracks, on NW 1st Street, passed the Carlsbad pavilion and turned west on NW 6th Street. The El Paso Morning Times of 1909 reports that the construction of the second Texas Carlsbad building will cost about $40,000. The equivalent sum in modern dollars is not known. The new building was to be "50 x 130 feet. It will be fire proof [sic] and steam heat [sic]." The building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for the Crazy Laundry and Dry Cleaning after the drinking pavilion was closed in the 1930's. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth24967/
The Health Resort Quarterly, 1 of 4, Cover
The cover of The (October 1915) Health Resort Quarterly, published by the Commercial Club of Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The wreath on the cover frames a lady's arm and hand holding a glass of (mineral) water with captions "ANALYSIS HAS PROVED IT TO HAVE NO EQUAL" above and "FAMED THE WORLD OVER" below, referring to the mineral water from the local wells. A colophon at bottom reads: "Index Print [symbol] Mineral Wells." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29832/
The Health Resort Quarterly, 2 of 4: Page 1
The Health Resort Quarterly was published by the Commercial Club, located at 106 East Wall Street (now NE 4th Street). This volume was published October, 1915. Officers were: J.C Pangle, President; Dr. J.H McCracken, Vice President; W.I. Smith, Treasurer and Fred Burman, Secretary. The publication contained words of wisdom, advertisements extolling Mineral Wells, and items of local news. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29826/
The Health Resort Quarterly, 3 of 4: Pages 2 and 3
Listed on this page are articles extolling the qualities of local mineral water, the mineral water baths, and the year-round climate of the city. Advertisements defining the grades of water offered by The Carlsbad Water Company and the amenities offered by The Damron Hotel are also to be found on these pages. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29825/
The Health Resort Quarterly, 4 of 4: Pages 4 and 5
On these pages are seen advertisements for The Fairfield Inn, owner Mrs. Walter H. Boykin; The Oxford Hotel (C. H. Browning is listed as the proprietor) with European and American plans available; and The Davis Well Water and By-Products (Dr. E. A. Davis, is listed as president). The quarterly reports that the Odd Fellow Convention will be held in Mineral Wells in 1916. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29824/
[Looking South on Mesquite Street]
A photograph that looks south on Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue)is shown here. It was taken after 1914, as the pavement indicates. Several automobiles and a horse-drawn buggy share the street. Note the water fountain between cars in right-center foreground. This water fountain was later moved to Mineral Wells' West City Park, and is now in the "Towne Common", located in the 100 block of SW 1st Avenue. The picture may be found on page 79 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS . . . " Mini Edition, 2004. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20435/
[A Love Story of Mineral Wells]
This photograph appears to be a fragment of the cover of an advertising booklet that includes the fiction "A Love Story of Mineral Wells", by Mamie Wynn Cox. Her fiction was first published in 1915. Four libraries worldwide claim possession of a copy of it. The complete booklet is available by flipping through the page by selecting "next" above the photographs. The cover shows a lady holding a handful of dominoes, which was probably meant to establish a connection to Mineral Wells, Dominoes once being a popular pastime in the city. The game of 42 (named after the number of points that could be scored in a game) was invented in Garner, seven miles east of Mineral Wells. For readers interested in obtaining a copy of the fiction, the Dewey Number of it is 833; the Library of Congress Call Number is PS 3505.O97 texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20213/
Mesquite Street North From Throckmorton Street
A postcard of Mesquite Street, taken from Throckmorton Street [In 2008: NE 1st Avenue from NE 1st Street] Note the Post Office, completed August 1913, at end of the newly-paved street. The trolley tracks were removed in 1913, the street paved, and sidewalks installed in 1914. The street names were changed in 1920. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20442/
Mineral Wells High School
We have here a view from the south of Mineral Wells' High School, built in 1915 at 101 NW 5th Avenue. This side of the building faces W. Hubbard Street. The tower atop the West Ward School can be seen below the skyline, and to the left, above the high school. (The West Ward school was torn down in 1930.) texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth25052/