You limited your search to:

  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1990-1999
[The Zonta Club of Mineral Wells--a Program, 1994]
A program from the January 1994 Zonta International meeting in Mineral Wells honoring the distinguished women graduates of Mineral Wells High School. The mark "/MWSCH (3)" invites interpretation. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth16356/
[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]
Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20346/
[Mineral Wells, Texas 1881]
This is a photograph of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken in 1881. (Please observe that the picture carries a copyright by A. F. Weaver.) It is the earliest picture of Mineral Wells available. It was mailed to A.F. Weaver by a woman in Colorado, who found it in her great-grandfather's (James Bevan) belongings, in 2004. The late relative was a world traveler, and spent only a short time in Mineral Wells. The photograph was obtained too late to be included in the last edition (the mini edition) of TIME WAS... James Alvis Lynch and his family arrived in Millsap Valley December 24, 1877. He dug a well to 41 feet in 1878, but it was dry. He contracted to have another well drilled in 1880, and it encountered mineral water. The water acquired renown for its medicinal quality. It fetched health-seekers to what would later be Mineral Wells by the thousands. Lynch laid out the city of Mineral Wells on his 80-acre farm in 1881. The unidentified lines of white objects in the upper background are a mystery, but are probably tents. H.M. Berry, an early resident, and Mineral Wells' first school teacher, wrote in 1921, " . . .by the first of October (1881) it looked like a small army was camped here, tents were everywhere." The Lynch cabins, site of the mineral water discovery well, is in the grove of trees at the middle left of the picture. A note on the photographer: James Bevan was born in Lancashire, England, but spent much of his life traveling in the United States (where, presumably, he took this photograph), Australia and Africa. He was acquainted with Cecil Rhodes, whom he reputedly disliked. He cured a Zulu chief of severe constipation, and was made blood brother to him in gratitude. Mr. Bevan would have been put to death (along with the attending witch doctor) upon the event of failure to cure. He spent little time in America. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20337/
[NE 1st Avenue]
This photograph shows a scene of NE 1st Avenue. The stone building on the left is the "Yeager Building", which once housed the "Lion" Drugstore. At the time of the photograph, it housed Baker Medical Supply. A handwritten date on the back of the photograph states "1993." In 2007, the coffee shop "H2Jo" is located in this building. The next building up the street (and in the next block) was once the Hub Tailors, and the large three-story building farther up the street is the Western Auto Store. At the end of the street is the Old Post Office, which currently houses the Women's Club. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20430/
[The Yeager Building]
A stone building named "Yeager Block" on the corner of NE 1st Avenue and NE 1st Street is shown here. (NE 1st is the street shown in the picture. Dr. Yeager lived two blocks east--up that street--of the drugstore). Once home of (what was known to some as)"The Lion Drugstore", it had a metal statue of a lion mounted on its roof. The statue of the lion was donated to a scrap metal drive for World War II, in order to aid the war effort. At the time of this photograph, (a handwritten note on the back of the photograph gives the date as 1993), it was housing the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth20428/
[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]
The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, and Northwestern (WMW&NW) Railroad began operations October 1,1891. The Texas & Pacific Railway bought out the WMW&NW in 1902, and shortly thereafter built this depot to replace a former wooden structure that had been destroyed by fire. The rail line had a colorful history, operating through World War II and into the 1990's. Construction of an extension of the line to the city of Oran was completed in 1907, and on to Graford the following January. In 1912 two McKeen motor coaches (called "Doodlebugs" by the locals)were added. These were self-contained, 200 Horsepower, 70-foot long, gasoline-powered, 80-passenger coaches which provided service between Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Fort Worth and Dallas. A round trip took less than six hours, and two "Doodlebugs" provided service in each direction every three hours. In 1913, the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad, building south from Seymour, Texas, began operations over the WMW&NW line from Salesville to Mineral Wells, thus connecting the cities of Seymour, Olney, Jacksboro, Graford, Oran, Salesville, Mineral Wells, and Weatherford with daily round-trip service to Dallas. In 1928, passenger traffic had declined to a point that passenger service was discontinued, and did not resume until the nation began mobilizing for World War II in 1940. Nearly a half million troops (429,966) passed through the depot during the war years in transit to and from Ft. Wolters training base. The City of Mineral Wells bought the 22.8 miles of track to Weatherford October 1, 1989. It was the last operator, and kept the road open for freight traffic, for the benefit of local businesses. The passenger depot was restored after the trains ceased operations, and it is now [2008] the offices of the Elliott Waldren Abstract Company, and lawyer George Gault. The right-of-way from Mineral Wells to Weatherford was converted to a Texas Parks and Wildlife trail in June 1998. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29853/
[An E-mail Dated 3/9/'99 to A. F. Weaver from Dr. Meyer, of Texas A&M]
An e-mail to A.F. Weaver, concerning Ike Sablosky, written by Greg Meyer of Texas A & M, March 9, 1999. Mr. Weaver apparently had inquired about Mr. Sablosky in connection with a photograph. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth29809/
"Crazy Hotel Opens"
CRAZY HOTEL OPENS: A program Presented by A.F. Weaver to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association March 10, 1994. [This is the first of ten pages, stapled at upper left-hand corner.] The text was probably computer-generated in 13-point sans-serif script and it is likely that Mr. Weaver began his program with a contemporary newspaper account of the gala opening of the re-built hotel. Certainly the opening of the significant hotel was a red-letter day in the history of Mineral Wells. A photocopy of a souvenir menu was laminated on the back of Mr. Weaver's prepared program.] texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth38087/
[The Baker Hotel Roof Garden]
This photograph is identified as "Baker Hotel Roof Garden February 1999." Two chandeliers are still in place on the ceiling, but the missing floor boards, the peeling paint, and the deserted condition of the room is indicative of the sad condition of once a beautiful ballroom. A ballroom on the twelfth floor was titled "The Cloud Room" by virtue of the clouds painted on its ceiling. A picture of it has yet [2014] to be found. texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39163/
Baker Hotel Swimming Pool
No Description texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth39156/