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  Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
 Decade: 1930-1939
[The Road to Mineral Wells]

[The Road to Mineral Wells]

Date: 1936
Creator: unknown
Description: The 1936 opening of the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Weatherford, now known as Highway US 180. This was a Works Project Administration (WPA) highway, built during the early "Great Depression" recovery period. The photograph is looking west toward Mineral Wells, and the Baker Hotel may be seen faintly on the horizon at left center of the picture.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
A Jinricksha

A Jinricksha

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: Notes that accompany the photograph read: "Picture taken near the top of the thousand steps which used to climb East Mountain up NE 3rd Street. Path can still be seen going up the side of the mountain at this point." The souvenir picture was taken in the 1930's, and is believed to have been taken at the photographer's cabin, where the winding donkey trail formerly crossed the steps.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[The Grande Courts]

[The Grande Courts]

Date: 1930?
Creator: unknown
Description: A tourist court, built about 1930 by Charlie E. Turner, Harold Dennis, and Clarence Hunt is depicted here. It was located in the 1000 block of West Hubbard Street. Grande [pronounced "Grand-dee"--at least in Mineral Wells] Courts was a national chain of franchise motels. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 99. The sign reads "Grande Courts Tourist Apts."
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Memories of 1934

Memories of 1934

Date: 1934
Creator: unknown
Description: A 1934 Yearbook from Mineral Wells High School belonging to Nealia Dillard is shown here.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Sewerage Disposal Plant

Sewerage Disposal Plant

Date: 1930?/1939?
Creator: unknown
Description: Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]

[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]

Date: 1930/1939
Creator: unknown
Description: A caption on the back of the photograph states, "This picture, taken in the 1930's, shows the drinking pavilion in the [lacuna] Crazy Hotel." Recognizable are Boyce Ditto, standing third from right; N.E. Adams, last on the right, standing reading a newspaper; and Mrs. Veale, mother of Cecil Young, seated on left. Many people came to Mineral Wells to bathe and to "Drink their way to health" at the many wells and pavilions that catered to the public. This drinking pavilion is still extant, just off the lobby of the "Crazy" (now [2008] a retirement home), but it no longer dispenses mineral water.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[Crazy Sign]

[Crazy Sign]

Date: 1936?
Creator: unknown
Description: This picture, looking east with the Baker Hotel in the background, of the Crazy Hotel sign was colorized by Mr. A.F. Weaver. The Crazy Sign was constructed in 1933 in the center of Mineral Wells and spanned Hubbard Street (US 180) at its intersection with Oak Avenue It was quite a landmark, as it was one of only two signs allowed by the Texas Department of Transportation to cross a highway maintained by the State. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The urgency of its removal during the Holiday Season was never explained; nor was it ever quite understood by the general public. It was sold for scrap some time later.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
[A Lion's Club Christmas Project]

[A Lion's Club Christmas Project]

Date: 1938?
Creator: unknown
Description: A note by A.F. Weaver identifies this group as "Left to right: Lions, Cary Lodal, Moon Mullins, Charlie Johnson, "Santa Claus", Jess Pervine, Noble Glenn." The last four are pictured as sitting on the running board of a General Motors truck, which appears to be loaded with wrapped gifts. (No connection is known or implied, but since the "Santa Claus" in the picture is not identified, an interesting bit of local history is offered by way of suppletion: Rancher Charley Belding, a bachelor living west of Palo Pinto, was known annually to contribute (anonymously) truckloads of Christmas Gifts for needy children in the county.) Note the Hexagon Hotel in the upper right corner and the two gasoline stations, Gulf and Sinclair (H.C.) The picture appears to have been taken on the east side of N. Oak Avenue in about the 500 block. The Lion's club, mentioned in the title, is a service organization.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Sewing Room

Sewing Room

Date: 1937?
Creator: unknown
Description: The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library
Crazy Radio Theatre

Crazy Radio Theatre

Date: 1933?
Creator: unknown
Description: According to A. F. Weaver, in his book "Time was in Mineral Wells", the Crazy Radio Theatre broadcast from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel in Mineral Wells over the Texas Quality Network. The show's origin is said to be the selling of "Crazy Water Crystals." Identified are Hal Collins (Manager of the Crazy Hotel), Paul, Ludy, Dick, Jake, Slim. [No last names are given.] Please note the early 12-string steel guitar held by Paul.
Contributing Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library